Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Restoring Yaesu FT-101E  (Read 3948 times)
KD0TLI
Member

Posts: 42




Ignore
« on: October 10, 2012, 02:20:07 PM »

 Huh
Disclaimer:  I'm brand new to Ham radio - working on my technician.

I have an old FT-101E that is in bad shape, but it has alot of family history so I'm commited.
I dont have a background in electronics, but Im determined to fix this thing.

Could someone tell me what kind of tools I should start looking for to get started ?
I have two other FT-101's that will also need repair, so I might as well get some decent gear now.

I really appreciate any help you guys can give me.
Thanks.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20636




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 02:30:32 PM »

If you don't have the rig's service manual, that would be the place I'd start (get one).

You can download one from here: http://foxtango.org/FT-101SVCMan/Foxtango%20101%20Service.htm

I'd also have the rig on a bench in front of me, with a notepad, and try out all the rig's functions, taking notes on what works and what doesn't work.

The service manual will help guide you through diagnostics.  Normally with a rig like this you'd want a VTVM or FETVM (a bench voltmeter, high impedance, preferably with an RF probe also); and probably an oscilloscope good to 50 or 100 MHz with matching compensated probes.  A frequency counter might be helpful, but usually isn't needed.  A 50 Ohm dummy load and external RF power meter (wattmeter or similar, needn't be very accurate) will help determine how the transmitter's working and sharpen up on the tune-up procedure.  A shielded, stable RF signal generator can be very helpful for receiver measurements and alignment, if necessary.





Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 03:54:27 PM »

The service manual will tell you what you need to do an alignment. Sometimes they can get carried away on the specifics, just remember that when the book spec's an HP 427 FET voltmeter they mean any decent Hi-Z meter.

A good digital multimeter, soldering iron, rosin core solder, a well-lighted workspace, flat and Philips blade screwdrivers, needlenose pliers, plastic alignment tools, etc. should take care of 90% of what you'll need. If you get serious about radio work a good RF signal generator, RF demodulator probe for the DMM, and a 60 MHz or better oscilloscope can make troubleshooting easier. A clever bunny who knows how to zero the 100 kHz internal calibrator against WWV can do nicely without a frequency counter, but having one is more fun than not having one and they're way cheaper than what they used to be.

Just avoid anything with the word " Heathshkit " on the front panel.  That's the Chippewa word for " throw in dumpster ".   Grin
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
KD0TLI
Member

Posts: 42




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 07:14:02 PM »

As far as Oscillisciopes go, is the factory YO-100 Monitor Scope useful for repair ?
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4818




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 07:37:36 PM »

If you can fix it and restore it on your own, you can get someone with test equipment to align it. Otherwise, you can spend a ton of money on test equipment.
Logged
KA4POL
Member

Posts: 2096




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2012, 10:11:13 PM »

Taking your disclaimer into account I have to say this is not a good beginners challenge. You really can do more harm than good. Try to get someone experienced to take a look together with you. That way you can gain experience.
The service manual usually tells you what equipment is required for adjustment etc. You may not need all of that depending upon the problems you'll find.
One basic thing you can do is checking out the boards and connectors for corrosion and bad components, i.e. strange looking capacitors and similar.
The Monitor scope would be useful for checking your RF output. I doubt it replaces a serious scope.
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2012, 10:48:02 PM »

As far as Oscillisciopes go, is the factory YO-100 Monitor Scope useful for repair ?

Nope.

Monitor scopes have the very limited application range of observing an RF envelope with no internal triggering. As a station accessory they're nice to have, but they rely on a working transceiver in order to do anything useful.
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4818




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 05:18:55 AM »

Taking your disclaimer into account I have to say this is not a good beginners challenge. You really can do more harm than good. Try to get someone experienced to take a look together with you. That way you can gain experience.
The service manual usually tells you what equipment is required for adjustment etc. You may not need all of that depending upon the problems you'll find.
One basic thing you can do is checking out the boards and connectors for corrosion and bad components, i.e. strange looking capacitors and similar.
The Monitor scope would be useful for checking your RF output. I doubt it replaces a serious scope.

He is going to need a minimum of a scope, audio generator, and RF generator. A decent combo is easily going to run him about $500. He is better off having it aligned by a professional or serious amateur. They are used to doing it, can do it in a quarter of the time, and relatively cheap.

Besides, if he does go out and spends the money on test equipment, what does he do with it afterwards?
Logged
KC9QQM
Member

Posts: 184




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2012, 06:16:52 AM »

I agree that this might be a bit much for a beginner. Not knowing what if any electronics experience he has, this can be complicated tracing signal paths if he has to do more than align it.

I restored a FT-101e a couple of years ago, re-cap'ed it and did a complete alignment and you really do need a scope, a frequency counter and a volt meter.

To the original poster, find a local ham that can help you with it, besides you can technially only test the receive part of the unit, with no license yet, you cannot transmit, not even into a dummy load as far as I understand things. You will want to work toward your General to fully use this rig.

Jeff
KC9QQM
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 1006




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2012, 02:30:56 PM »

without a license, you cannot radiate.  a theoretically perfect dummy load with no loss, and perfect shielding on the transceiver, would allow any bench monkey to key up and check the rig out.

a search for "theoretically perfect" on eBay provides no hits.  and covers off to jam diddlesticks and golden screwdrivers into the chassis is not perfect shielding.

nonetheless, I would put a coax and dummy load on the box whenever it is plugged in, just in case there are bad relay circuits, etc.

first part of the puzzle is to check the tubes.  a truly bad tube at any stage of the set might be a clue that there is fundamental damage to the wiring in that stage or previous golden screwdrivers have been used to detriment.  next is the sniff test and the "uuuuggggglyyyy" test of checking out component condition under the chassis.  obvious failures need to be addressed before putting power to the thing.

if the rig has not been used within the past few years, it is really a good idea to make exact value replacements of the power suply electrolytics at minimum, and all of them if you're really an old-time "shotgun" repair tech who is way tired of overlooking a stinker of a part more than once.  ohmmeter checks of the line cord with switch off and switch on to make a go/no-go check for a failed transformer.

at that point, your elmer (local mentor who is working with you on this thing) will probably go for the smoke test, and then if it all stays inside the parts, start checking functionality.

this IS a radio on the sunset side of 40 years old, and while they don't necessarily decay as fast as old cars, there is going to be work this radio needs.  besides test equipment, you do need troubleshooting skills and parts.  this is why I'm not saying buy this and that and the third thing, but pair up with a mentor.  hit the ARRL website and find a radio club if you haven't found an elmer yet, there are lots of helpful things they can guide you through.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 02:37:00 PM by KD0REQ » Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 1006




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2012, 02:44:40 PM »

oh, and fair warning, there are high voltages in the rig, in the vicinity of 800 volts on the output tube plates and 250-300 volts on the suppressor grids and driver plate.  they show up in the darndest places.

you don't want to be in those places, especially with one hand resting on the grounded chassis.
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3927




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2012, 03:22:52 PM »

Just to play Devil's Advocate...........



Let's flash back 50 years. It's now 1962 and some aspiring but inexperienced Hamateur wannabee has acquired a few WW II surplus items of the ARC-5 persuasion and plans to rebuild / re-purpose them into something capable of making Q's. Said aspirant has something that could transmit, something that could receive, and a modest stack of 50's vintage TV chassis they can rob for parts like transformers and electrolytics. Plan is to cobble together something that works like a power supply with T/R switching capability.

What say you now?

Wait until the 80's when solid state rigs become the norm and high voltages are a distant memory, or bone up on as much tubular legend & lore as possible until they can work on their stuff without risking a visit to St. Peter? Granted, anyone fixing a clock radio in the 60's learned about HAZARDOUS VOLTAGES straight up as mandatory part of the experience, but in retrospect, how in the hell did anyone survive the DIY learning curve before 13.8 volts DC and three-prong power cords were invented?



Note To Quicksilver147:  Visit the Fox Tango site to learn as much as you can about the care and feeding of the Yaesu FT-101 series before you croak the radio (or yourself) on the bench.

Start Here:  http://foxtango.org/ft101/foxtangoft101.htm  then explore the rest of the site.

Ignorance is curable. Stupidity is preventable. Once you figure out the difference between the two... (That's the trick!)  Grin
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
K7MH
Member

Posts: 344




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2012, 10:11:35 PM »

A set of board extenders would be handy. They run about $100 from what I have seen.

And yes, IMO you are better off having someone who knows them inside and out repair/align it.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4844




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2012, 02:29:12 AM »

Spare PA tubes would be a good idea - but likely to be expensive.
Logged
KD0TLI
Member

Posts: 42




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2012, 04:25:29 PM »

I appreciate those of you who responded to my post with encouraging words -- thank you.
Even more, I appreciate the technical know-how and advice.

I'm very safety consious and capable of learning how to do this with some time.
I have a can-do mentality and I'll get it running with the help of thoese like you !

It seems to me the future of HAM radio lies in the support of those who've gone before us......

Thanks,
Dan.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!