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Author Topic: Restoring Yaesu FT-101E  (Read 3832 times)
W9GB
Member

Posts: 2626




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« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2012, 06:29:26 PM »

Quote from: AC5UP
anyone fixing a clock radio in the 60's learned about HAZARDOUS VOLTAGES straight up as mandatory part of the experience, but in retrospect, how in the hell did anyone survive the DIY learning curve before 13.8 volts DC and three-prong power cords were invented?
N -

Sadly, some did not survive it (electrocutions) in post WW2 period (1945-1960s).
This led to the National Electrical Code (NEC) changes in 1962 and 1970 for Safety Ground (addition of green, third wire), and further changes over past 40 years such as Ground Fault Circuit Protection (GFCI).

The electrocutions due to installation of metallic vertical CB base antennas during 1970s CB craze, led the Reagan Administration (1982-1983) to sign the Consumer Product Safety Standard,
Title 16, Part 1204, Safety for Omnidirectional CB Base Station Antennas.
http://law.justia.com/cfr/title16/16-2.0.1.2.35.html
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 06:43:36 PM by W9GB » Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13353




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« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2012, 06:30:09 PM »

Get to know the folks in the local radio clubs.  There may be someone who lives
not too far away who will help you through the process, show you the ropes,
loan test equipment, help you debug the stages, and try to make sure that the
shocks you get are only severe enough to learn from.

Internet advice is useful, but nothing beats having someone right there to point
out the obvious problems ("there is supposed to be a tube in that socket") and
to reinforce proper safety precautions.


I went through a similar process:  when in high school I spent my whole summer's
earnings on a SSB rig that didn't work.  I think it took 6 weeks to find the bent
solder lug that was shorting out a capacitor, but I learned enough in the process
to upgrade from Novice to Advanced in one sitting.
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