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Author Topic: Grounding Radio, Tuner, COAX - Another Question  (Read 1456 times)
KD2CJJ
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Posts: 369




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« on: October 13, 2012, 07:34:36 AM »

I searched a few times didnt find any good details.  Is it best practice to ground your radio and/or Tuner - I see conflicting information?  Keep in mind that my shack is too far from a ground rod so I am using my HOT water pipes -  I have confirmed that the HOT water pipes are making a good ground by testing continuity to the electrical ground (which is grounded using a ground rod, which is tied into the hot/colder water system).

I am ready to now ground outside the COAX - is this too much grounding?  OR just really unnecessary?  Is it hurting anything?

Thanks!!!
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73

Mike
KD2CJJ
K8AC
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Posts: 1478




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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2012, 08:14:54 AM »

If your hot water pipes are grounded, it's probably purely incidental with the connection occurring at metal sink faucets.  Not what you want or need.  These days, it would be unusual to find metal cold water pipes that actually go into the ground.  Any and all cables coming from outside the house should be connected to ground at a single point, ideally where the electrical, phone and cable TV lines come into the house.  If that's impossible, at least run a heavy copper wire connection from a single point radio cable ground panel to the electrical panel ground rod.  There's tons of info on how to do station lightning protection grounding and that's what you want to search for.  It's been covered many times here on the Elmer's forum - try the search here.  Also, check out the Polyphaser website for more info on the subject.  It's only necessary if you want to protect yourself, your gear and your home from lightning damage.

73, K8AC
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K8POS
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Posts: 332


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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2012, 12:19:44 PM »

I have a 10 foot ground rod on the other side of my shack wall.
That ground rod is tied to the main ground around the corner of the house.
All my equipment: radios, tuner, power supplies are tied to the shack ground rod
By separate ground wires.  Do not daisy chain them  or run from the radio to the tuner to the power supply, give each one it's own ground to a central point.

Bob
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KD2CJJ
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Posts: 369




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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2012, 02:07:55 PM »


Well... My  house was made in the 70s so copper pipe is literally down 10 feet in the ground from the street to my house -- ALL COPPER ... and actually it comes up from the bottom of my basement floor - thus grounded.  In addition, my electrical box is grounded using a ground ROD and the boiler's electrical ground pulls from that ground thus seems to be all well grounded... I have confirmed this with Ohm Meter.. at various points on the plumbing..

I guess I would like to know is there any downfall of grounding - especially on transmit or receive?  The ground I have right now is NOT a safety ground more of an RF ground - and if so is it really a RF ground and is it helping any?  I dont have any common mode current and little near field as the antenna is not all that far from my shack.

Safety grounds should happen outside which I have on my mast but NOT on the coax..  So I guess that's the other question should I ground the coax?  Does THIS affect receive or transmit?

Any advice appreciated.
If your hot water pipes are grounded, it's probably purely incidental with the connection occurring at metal sink faucets.  Not what you want or need.  These days, it would be unusual to find metal cold water pipes that actually go into the ground.  Any and all cables coming from outside the house should be connected to ground at a single point, ideally where the electrical, phone and cable TV lines come into the house.  If that's impossible, at least run a heavy copper wire connection from a single point radio cable ground panel to the electrical panel ground rod.  There's tons of info on how to do station lightning protection grounding and that's what you want to search for.  It's been covered many times here on the Elmer's forum - try the search here.  Also, check out the Polyphaser website for more info on the subject.  It's only necessary if you want to protect yourself, your gear and your home from lightning damage.

73, K8AC
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Mike
KD2CJJ
M6GOM
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Posts: 1017




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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2012, 03:50:26 PM »

What antennas are you using? If you're using balanced ones such as yagis, dipoles etc, you don't need to ground anything. You can put a lightning system in but you want that before it enters the house/shack.
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KD2CJJ
Member

Posts: 369




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« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2012, 04:28:29 PM »

Dipole... I just decided to take off all the grounds and didn't see all that much difference in signal receive and made a few contacts.  I did notice a faint birdie that goes away without the ground but barely noticeable with the ground.  I guess I have some noise going across my pipes.


I will keep trying out with and with out.


What antennas are you using? If you're using balanced ones such as yagis, dipoles etc, you don't need to ground anything. You can put a lightning system in but you want that before it enters the house/shack.
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73

Mike
KD2CJJ
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