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Author Topic: What Antenna Connector Is Most Most Common On Mobile Amateur Radios These Days?  (Read 1277 times)
N0JS
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Posts: 17




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« on: October 12, 2012, 03:22:51 PM »

I haven't been as active in the radio hobby as I have been in the past, so this might seem like sort of an elementary question, but please forgive me. What antenna connectors are most common on mobile amateur radio transceivers these days, particularly 2 meters, 440 mHz, 1.2 gHz, etc.?  When I first got into amateur radio, most VHF/UHF mobiles had a simple SO239 on the back. A little bit ago I looked on line at an Icom 1.2 gHz radio and it had an N connector on the rear. I could have sworn that the last time I looked on the rear of a Motorola land mobile radio it was sporting a mini UHF antenna connector. Anyway, does that mean that all current production amateur mobile transceivers for VHF/UHF/800 are still mainly SO239, or isn't it quite that simple?
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2012, 03:28:14 PM »

SO239 for most 144MHz and 440MHz transcievers. Type N on some 440 and probably most 1.2GHz.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2012, 03:48:21 PM »

I use only banana jacks above 1.2 GHz, until I get to 10.3 GHz where I switch to RJ45 modulars. Wink

Seriously, UHF is very standard at 144 MHz and below (and also at 222 MHz) for most home station and mobile equipment.  Amateur rigs transition to type N at 432 MHz (sometimes), and almost always at 902 MHz and above.

Hand-helds are something else, entirely and often use SMA nowadays (which is good through several GHz, so no reason to change for the higher bands).  Some still use BNC or TNC, or even reverse-SMA (found mostly on part 95 stuff and not much on amateur gear).
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N0JS
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2012, 05:10:10 PM »

Thank you very much for the replies.  I think the Motorola mobiles at work are mini UHF, but I really haven't seen that one in amateur radio yet.
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