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Author Topic: Communications  (Read 2142 times)
KC6BIU
Member

Posts: 2




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« on: October 25, 2012, 04:18:53 PM »

I cannot understand why I can receive a very strong signal from a foreign country & not be able to communicate on the same frequency. Thank you
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WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2012, 05:14:00 PM »

Is your transceiver set up correctly? Can you communicate with anyone?
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2012, 07:36:43 PM »

Tell us about your ANTENNA, and also the band(s) and time of day...
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W1EL
Member

Posts: 35




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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2012, 04:28:20 AM »

Is the guy working split?
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W9GB
Member

Posts: 2577




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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2012, 04:55:06 AM »

Quote from: KC6BIU
I cannot understand why I can receive a very strong signal from a foreign country & not be able to communicate on the same frequency. Thank you.
We assume your question is in regard to 40 meters and the differing allocations between ITU Regions 1, 2, 3 ??

This Wikipedia entry is not complete, but provides how the differences began (BTW, WW2 was a factor).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/40-meter_band

Only since 2009, have international communications (split) been possible --- foreign country SW stations still exist in the 40 / 41 meter allocation.

w9gb

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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20536




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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2012, 09:17:42 AM »

I cannot understand why I can receive a very strong signal from a foreign country & not be able to communicate on the same frequency. Thank you

I'm guessing you mean the station is transmitting on one frequency and receiving on a different one.  A lot of "DX" does this, and "we" (Americans) have to use split-frequency operation to accommodate them.
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KC6BIU
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2012, 09:25:00 AM »

Thanks for the reply. Next time I will try using split frequency. It makes sense to me.
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KH2G
Member

Posts: 229




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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2012, 07:53:22 PM »

There is also a strong possibility that your not being heard over  the big guns that you don't hear or he may have local QRN/QRM
Regards
Dick KH2G
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W7KKK
Member

Posts: 374




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« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2012, 10:40:37 AM »

I will suggest that they are running an amp and possibly a very nice beam that gives you a great signal.
Perhaps your station is lacking an adequate antenna system for him to hear you assuming all other factors have been considered.
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M0HCN
Member

Posts: 473




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« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2012, 10:56:53 AM »

In general on HF your aerial system makes more difference to the other guys ability to hear you then it does to your ability to hear the other guy.

This is because a poor aerial at your end attenuates both the wanted signal AND the band noise when you are receiving and with an even halfway decent radio the band noise rather then the rigs self noise sets the rx noise floor, on transmit however it reduces your radiated power without causing an equivalent reduction in the noise level at the receiver half a world away.

Look to your aerials.

Regards, Dan.

 
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