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Author Topic: Popular Ridge Lean to, near Redington ME  (Read 2370 times)
N2XIW
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Posts: 22




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« on: May 27, 2016, 06:33:05 AM »

Was wondering if anyone is familiar with the area along the Appalachian Trail?

I know its very remote, no cell coverage, but was curious as to if there's any VHF/UHF access to repeaters
there? Maybe from higher points with a decent antenna?

Anyone hike that area, what do you carry for emergency communications?
How / where do you recharge?

Thanks
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W2EM
Member

Posts: 62




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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2016, 08:12:29 AM »

You could always carry a Spot communicator for emergencies.

http://www.findmespot.com/en/
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KC2MMI
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Posts: 743




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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2016, 01:43:24 PM »

I don't find any repeaters even close to there. But if there were, that's still mountainous terrain and you can't hit a repeater when you're not on top of a mountain or within eyesight of it. Today's paper had a blurb about the authorities up there (on the Trail in Maine) finding the body of a hiker who got lost two years ago. Couldn't get cell phone coverage, stayed alive and lost nearly four weeks and then died despite a massive search.

So, SPOT or InReach or a PLB of any type. The PLB will cost more but requires no subscription fees. All it does is transmit a distress call.

SPOT and InReach should be cheaper but both require varying subscription options and allow two-way communications of differing types. With SPOT you can send an "I'm OK" and breadcrumbs, cheaper than InReach. With InReach you have more options and more cost.

Different SPOT models, but I think the latest allows for a USB charger (which can be solar) and AA or AAA batteries and one good set of those should last you till you come across a store.

Any kind of ham radio in the Maine woods is going to weigh a hell of a lot more.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 3063




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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2016, 05:50:46 PM »

You'd be surprised at how many repeaters you can hit from remote areas if you take along a portable beam!  But for the sake of safety, always take a satellite phone with you when you are traveling through very remote locations.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 2041




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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2016, 03:09:12 AM »

I frequent that area often ( I'm a woods bummer and brook trout fishing nut) Cell coverage in that area is iffy a best if not impossible, check point wardens will inform you of that. The woman Hiker whose body was recently found after two years near Redington and Caribou ponds left her SPOT locater in her motel room. Best bet in that area is let others know your plans for a specified time period and know what your doing when messing about in the Maine N. wooods. I usually have one of my MFJ Cubs with me for nightly entertainment which I could possibly use in an emergency if needed. The most dependable form of  emergency radio coms in that area IF in a vehicle and not tromping through the woods is a CB Radio if you don't have a Sat phone. Depending solely on any electronic and/or battery operated coms and GPS in that area is a NO NO.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2016, 07:38:33 AM by W1JKA » Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3063




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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2016, 01:53:36 PM »

I frequent that area often ( I'm a woods bummer and brook trout fishing nut) Cell coverage in that area is iffy a best if not impossible, check point wardens will inform you of that. The woman Hiker whose body was recently found after two years near Redington and Caribou ponds left her SPOT locater in her motel room. Best bet in that area is let others know your plans for a specified time period and know what your doing when messing about in the Maine N. wooods. I usually have one of my MFJ Cubs with me for nightly entertainment which I could possibly use in an emergency if needed. The most dependable form of  emergency radio coms in that area IF in a vehicle and not tromping through the woods is a CB Radio if you don't have a Sat phone. Depending solely on any electronic and/or battery operated coms and GPS in that area is a NO NO.
   Good point about the CB.  I once got stuck in the middle of nowhere with zero cell phone towers or amateur repeaters in range!  The only thing that saved me was a trucker over 15 miles away who was able to hear me on CB channel 19.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 2041




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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2016, 02:10:45 PM »

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's the reason log truck drivers, logging yard ops, warden/ranger stations, other LEO entities, sporting  and private camp owners all keep a CB set close by and usually monitored, anyone that has a remote camp  in this part of the state knows what the morning CB welfare check net is all about.
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