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Author Topic: Chain link fence as ground for beverage antenna  (Read 4010 times)
K4SAV
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Posts: 1851




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« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2012, 07:18:29 AM »

A Beverage doesn't require a very low impedance ground connection.  A single ground rod should do.  If the ground rod has more impedance than you like, just subtract a little from the termination resistor value.  You can determine if the load impedance is correct by measuring the SWR at the input to the Beverage. 

Jerry, K4SAV
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W0BTU
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« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2012, 11:41:06 PM »

A good Beverage ground may not be as important as some other antennas, but that doesn't mean the ground resistance is inconsequential. A poor ground on a Beverage can make the signal levels and F/B ratio suffer, especially on a 2-wire bi-directional Beverage.
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WB3BEL
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Posts: 97




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« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2012, 07:03:47 AM »

What Jerry is saying is that having a low ground resistance on the order of 10s of ohms will not materially change the system termination resistance which is in hundreds of ohms.  This is very true.  So the antenna pattern will not be influenced in any significant way even if you only have a poor ground on the Beverage.

I think why some folks think a good ground is needed for Beverage has more to do with common mode problems than termination impedance.  This is a very important issue and if you live where it is very noisy, you should take care to provide adequate choking impedance to avoid common mode pickup.  This obviously is more important on the coaxial feedpoint side of the Beverage.  It is often not enough to rely on the Beverage transformer for common mode suppression.  Attention to the grounding at the transformer and use of multi-turn coaxial choke through large ferrite core at both ends of the feedline may make a difference in noise or interference pickup.

These common mode practices are even more critical for small receiving antennas like flags and pennants.
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