Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 10 Meter Worked Alll States Award  (Read 2035 times)
WB0U
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« on: November 12, 2012, 08:26:52 AM »

I'm looking for any tips on achieving  a 10 meter WAS award.

I'm having difficulty working the states that are too close for sporadic E propagation.   

I participate in the ARRL and Ten-X contests.  I've only heard North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota for the first time in last year's ARRL 10 meter contest.  I have never heard Illinois or Missouri.

Is 10 meters considered the most difficult band for a 5 band WAS award?   

73,  Lynn
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3834




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2012, 08:50:22 AM »

Is 10 meters considered the most difficult band for a 5 band WAS award?

I'd think 160 would be the most difficult due to propagation and the lack of stations, but if you keep at it you will work the adjacent states you need on Ten......... Every once in a while there will be remarkably short skip. It's more a matter of perseverance and luck than hardware, but if all else fails consider moving to Brownsville, TX.

It's all DX from there..........   Grin
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
N4OGW
Member

Posts: 295




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2012, 11:33:11 AM »

The ARRL 10m contest is one of the best places to pick up close states on 10m.

Because you will not have direct propagation it can be hard and signals will be very weak. You will probably have to work them via some kind of scatter. If you have a directional antenna you usually get the best signal pointing it towards the place 10m is open to, which could be in the opposite direction from the station you want to work. Using CW rather than SSB will make it easier.

Tor
N4OGW
Logged
KD8IZZ
Member

Posts: 282




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2012, 07:26:11 AM »

Have you tried a very low dipole?
Logged
N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4745




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 11:48:10 AM »

You are likely going to have to use a series of different antennas, with differing propagation patterns. Location helps. I used an Imax and being I was near the DE, PA, NJ border, I was able to get those 3, plus MD on a vertical via ground wave. Now, if you are in the middle of Kansas, then you are may have far more difficulty.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20559




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2012, 11:56:44 AM »

The ARRL 10m contest is one of the best places to pick up close states on 10m.

Because you will not have direct propagation it can be hard and signals will be very weak. You will probably have to work them via some kind of scatter. If you have a directional antenna you usually get the best signal pointing it towards the place 10m is open to, which could be in the opposite direction from the station you want to work. Using CW rather than SSB will make it easier.

Tor
N4OGW


+1.

Operating from a "larger" station (set up to be a multi-multi contest station) in the ARRL 10m contest, we worked all 50 States in one weekend from NJ.  This was near the peak of Cycle 23, so the longer haul stuff was quite easy; but we had a "skip zone" around us out to about 600 miles or so where no ionospheric propagation was working, regardless of antenna height (and we had three beams on three towers at different heights, including a low one on the roof of the house!).

What actually did work for grabbing stuff like NH, VT, ME, RI, VA, NC, OH, WV and KY, all of which were in the "dead zone" for F2 propagation, was meteor scatter.  Grabbed these all easily late at night when the F2 signals had mostly subsided and the only stations left on the band were serious contesters working around the clock.  Everybody had power and beams and meteor scatter signals were easily worked: Easier on CW than SSB, but even SSB was working okay.  Forward tropo scatter filled in stuff like NY, NJ, CT, MA, PA, DE and MD.  Then, meteors for stuff outside that range; then regular ionopsheric contacts beyond that.

Don't ignore the m.s.!  It usually takes power and a decent beam, but if the "other guy" does most of the heavy lifting, it can be worked with less.
Logged
WB0U
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2012, 07:26:45 AM »

Thanks for the input. 

I was up to 40 states confirmed on 10 meters after 25 years living in Minnesota.  I moved to Iowa 6 years ago and now my total is up to 29 states confirmed.

OK, backscatter propagation isn’t there all the time.  Here’s a link: http://ecjones.org/backscatter.html


I am building a Moxon antenna which will be ready for the ARRL 10 meter contest. 

During contests, I get requests to repeat information on SSB.  On CW information is almost always received the first time with no repeats necessary. 
.
 
I've used propnet.org , an automated network of PSK stations on 10 meters, to show when and where the 10 meter band is open..  It’s discouraging to see that no contacts have been logged during the past year between the station in Cedar Rapids, Iowa to Wisconsin or Illinois.

I can call CQ on CW and even if I get no replies, the reverse beacon network reports which stations can hear me and the measured signal to noise ratio.     

I've tried a CW beacon at my home station and can hear it 35 miles away with a mobile setup.  The beacon was running 100 watts to a ground mounted 4BTV vertical. 

I may be able to exploit the “Contacts must be made from the same location, or from locations no two of which are more than 50 miles apart” rule   by setting up a portable station 49 miles northeast of my home QTH in order to work stations in Wisconsin and Illinois.

Another idea is to point the beam up.  The snowtel meteor scatter network uses a yagi antenna with an elevation angle of 45 degrees.

73, Lynn
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20559




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2012, 08:49:58 AM »

Thanks for the input. 

I was up to 40 states confirmed on 10 meters after 25 years living in Minnesota.  I moved to Iowa 6 years ago and now my total is up to 29 states confirmed.

OK, backscatter propagation isn’t there all the time.  Here’s a link: http://ecjones.org/backscatter.html

My post was about meteor scatter, not backscatter.

Meteor scatter actually is there all the time.  Usually best just before sunrise or so, which is a good time to catch it because after sunrise the band gets noisier and busier and it would be difficult to hear the weak signals.



Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2012, 10:48:07 AM »

I'm looking for any tips on achieving  a 10 meter WAS award.

I'm having difficulty working the states that are too close for sporadic E propagation.   

I participate in the ARRL and Ten-X contests.  I've only heard North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota for the first time in last year's ARRL 10 meter contest.  I have never heard Illinois or Missouri.

Is 10 meters considered the most difficult band for a 5 band WAS award?   

73,  Lynn

Going out on limb here, but I'd say if you work all 50 states on 10M and get them confirmed, you've got the cat in the bag  Grin  but then again I could be wrong  Wink

Seriously, depending on your antenna(s) setup and the Take Off Angles (TOA) involved, you could have some rather large holes in your coverage map for 10M. You may need to work all you can with the current setup, do some modeling to verify your TOA's and then make some adjustments to get coverage to the areas that are currently void due to antenna patterns.

Good Luck.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
N4OGW
Member

Posts: 295




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2012, 12:30:29 PM »

It is not that hard to get WAS on 10m, you just have to operate more. Other contests that are good are the North American QSO parties. Also Field Day and the IARU contest are good.

Tor
N4OGW
Logged
KF6ABU
Member

Posts: 351




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2012, 01:27:01 PM »

Ive worked all states on 20, 15, and 10m while at work, remoted into my home computer using jt65 and 20w.

its pretty simple.
Logged
N7SMI
Member

Posts: 324




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2012, 10:07:22 AM »

This made me wonder how close I am to 10m WAS. I'm close enough that I'm going to start paying attention to the few states I still need.

I'd also recommend JT65. It's slow, but you can simply monitor for call signs in the states you need, then work them even if they're very weak.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!