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Author Topic: New Ham Radio Book  (Read 8955 times)
KI4JGT
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Posts: 114




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« on: November 12, 2012, 03:27:33 PM »

I'm trying to write an introduction to ham radio which will attempt to walk readers all the way through to getting their extras. I know I have a while to go but this is what I came up with last night. What do you think? https://docs.google.com/document/d/19OeA7e-vz1fZrmqQvSaNNEcyiLrh3u8I7jch8gEE88o/edit
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K2CMH
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Posts: 278




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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2012, 03:19:39 PM »

I read through it and think it is a great start!
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2825




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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2012, 04:55:31 PM »

Just glanced through it.  Several apostrophes that aren't necessary, and one cycle per second is one Hertz, not one Hert.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W5FYI
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Posts: 1046




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« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2012, 08:43:14 AM »

A newspaper editor once said, "Apostrophes are like power tools; if you don't know how to properly use them, it's best to leave them alone."

Some quick rules: Apostrophes are not be used to warn readers that the next letter is going to be an "s." Too many times, even here on eHam, I've seen references to radio's, antenna's, power supply's, battery's, etc. The rule-of-thumb is that plurals don't need apostrophes, but they may sometimes need a different ending (e.g. power supplies, batteries).

Apostrophes are not used to designate possession for the words he, her, or it. It is his radio, her QTH, and its frequency range is ....

Apostrophes are frequently used to denote contractions, such as isn't (is not), can't (cannot), he's (he is or he was), we're (we are), you're (you are), and so forth.

Apostrophes are also used to denote possession by proper nouns (John's radio was a ---, Carla's call sign is...," "The FCC's stand on this is...."

So here's my suggestion; once you've written your article, have a proofreader or two check its grammar, and have an elmer or two verify its radio accuracy.  Although you may be a klutz at wordsmanship, your proofreaders can make you look like a pro. GL

GL with the book.
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WX7G
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Posts: 6201




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« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2012, 11:34:37 AM »

Grocer's apostrophe.
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KI4JGT
Member

Posts: 114




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« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2012, 07:23:11 AM »

A newspaper editor once said, "Apostrophes are like power tools; if you don't know how to properly use them, it's best to leave them alone."

Some quick rules: Apostrophes are not be used to warn readers that the next letter is going to be an "s." Too many times, even here on eHam, I've seen references to radio's, antenna's, power supply's, battery's, etc. The rule-of-thumb is that plurals don't need apostrophes, but they may sometimes need a different ending (e.g. power supplies, batteries).

Apostrophes are not used to designate possession for the words he, her, or it. It is his radio, her QTH, and its frequency range is ....

Apostrophes are frequently used to denote contractions, such as isn't (is not), can't (cannot), he's (he is or he was), we're (we are), you're (you are), and so forth.

Apostrophes are also used to denote possession by proper nouns (John's radio was a ---, Carla's call sign is...," "The FCC's stand on this is...."

So here's my suggestion; once you've written your article, have a proofreader or two check its grammar, and have an elmer or two verify its radio accuracy.  Although you may be a klutz at wordsmanship, your proofreaders can make you look like a pro. GL

GL with the book.

Although I do believe there are too many situations in which I used apostrophes in this book, I stand by the legality of them all (excluding it <possessive>). I just used the find feature in my word processor to go through the entire document and find all apostrophes. All of them are used to represent either a possessive form of a word or a contraction. As far as it, he, and she. I've always hated that rule as far as it is concerned. He, she, and it are conjugated to form the possessive form of his, hers, and its. As with most other languages he, she, and it are conjugated together. At least in German, Esperanto, and Spanish. Though I could part with leaving his and hers in it's true conjugated form, I hate leaving its in that form. I don't know what it is about that word but I hate conjugating it to it's possessive. Though i understand the rule, I don't agree with it. One simple rule for a contraction and a possessive makes life o so much simpler. He's and she's doesn't sound right to me though so that is why I do conjugate them correctly. Other than it's, all the apostrophes appear to be legally correct in their parts of sentence, at least from where I'm standing.
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N3DF
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Posts: 252




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« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2012, 09:13:14 AM »

What's the point of reading book if the author takes no responsibility for the content?
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Neil N3DF
KI4JGT
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Posts: 114




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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2012, 01:29:48 PM »

What's the point of reading book if the author takes no responsibility for the content?

It's a concept from the software world. It's actually a fairly common concept in software development. Read up on the GNU GPL. Basically, I give you a knowledge of theory. What you do with that theory should not reflect upon me. I shouldn't get into trouble if you choose to misuse that knowledge. So to get around that, I deny everything. In the software world this is fair b/c you get to see the source code of the program you're about to run (under the GPL). So you agree that you know what the software does and upon running it you take full responsibility for it. In this instance, you see the text of the book. Therefore you can verify it with other sources. Also, being as I didn't charge anyone for the book this is the best way to nullify ALL lawsuits against it.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2825




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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2012, 05:22:37 PM »

A newspaper editor once said, "Apostrophes are like power tools; if you don't know how to properly use them, it's best to leave them alone."

Some quick rules: Apostrophes are not be used to warn readers that the next letter is going to be an "s." Too many times, even here on eHam, I've seen references to radio's, antenna's, power supply's, battery's, etc. The rule-of-thumb is that plurals don't need apostrophes, but they may sometimes need a different ending (e.g. power supplies, batteries).

Apostrophes are not used to designate possession for the words he, her, or it. It is his radio, her QTH, and its frequency range is ....

Apostrophes are frequently used to denote contractions, such as isn't (is not), can't (cannot), he's (he is or he was), we're (we are), you're (you are), and so forth.

Apostrophes are also used to denote possession by proper nouns (John's radio was a ---, Carla's call sign is...," "The FCC's stand on this is...."

So here's my suggestion; once you've written your article, have a proofreader or two check its grammar, and have an elmer or two verify its radio accuracy.  Although you may be a klutz at wordsmanship, your proofreaders can make you look like a pro. GL

GL with the book.

Although I do believe there are too many situations in which I used apostrophes in this book, I stand by the legality of them all (excluding it <possessive>). I just used the find feature in my word processor to go through the entire document and find all apostrophes. All of them are used to represent either a possessive form of a word or a contraction. As far as it, he, and she. I've always hated that rule as far as it is concerned. He, she, and it are conjugated to form the possessive form of his, hers, and its. As with most other languages he, she, and it are conjugated together. At least in German, Esperanto, and Spanish. Though I could part with leaving his and hers in it's true conjugated form, I hate leaving its in that form. I don't know what it is about that word but I hate conjugating it to it's possessive. Though i understand the rule, I don't agree with it. One simple rule for a contraction and a possessive makes life o so much simpler. He's and she's doesn't sound right to me though so that is why I do conjugate them correctly. Other than it's, all the apostrophes appear to be legally correct in their parts of sentence, at least from where I'm standing.

Who's talking about "legal"?  We're trying to make some grammar corrections to make it look as if you care about what you write.  As you stated in the very front of the manuscript, you've been away from school for a while.  I'm almost 70 years old but I volunteer at a nearby elementary school three days a week and I make corrections and suggestions in cases such as this quite often.

Just because the book is about "amateur" radio doesn't mean it can't look and sound "professional".
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KI4JGT
Member

Posts: 114




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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2012, 03:06:35 AM »

A newspaper editor once said, "Apostrophes are like power tools; if you don't know how to properly use them, it's best to leave them alone."

Some quick rules: Apostrophes are not be used to warn readers that the next letter is going to be an "s." Too many times, even here on eHam, I've seen references to radio's, antenna's, power supply's, battery's, etc. The rule-of-thumb is that plurals don't need apostrophes, but they may sometimes need a different ending (e.g. power supplies, batteries).

Apostrophes are not used to designate possession for the words he, her, or it. It is his radio, her QTH, and its frequency range is ....

Apostrophes are frequently used to denote contractions, such as isn't (is not), can't (cannot), he's (he is or he was), we're (we are), you're (you are), and so forth.

Apostrophes are also used to denote possession by proper nouns (John's radio was a ---, Carla's call sign is...," "The FCC's stand on this is...."

So here's my suggestion; once you've written your article, have a proofreader or two check its grammar, and have an elmer or two verify its radio accuracy.  Although you may be a klutz at wordsmanship, your proofreaders can make you look like a pro. GL

GL with the book.

Although I do believe there are too many situations in which I used apostrophes in this book, I stand by the legality of them all (excluding it <possessive>). I just used the find feature in my word processor to go through the entire document and find all apostrophes. All of them are used to represent either a possessive form of a word or a contraction. As far as it, he, and she. I've always hated that rule as far as it is concerned. He, she, and it are conjugated to form the possessive form of his, hers, and its. As with most other languages he, she, and it are conjugated together. At least in German, Esperanto, and Spanish. Though I could part with leaving his and hers in it's true conjugated form, I hate leaving its in that form. I don't know what it is about that word but I hate conjugating it to it's possessive. Though i understand the rule, I don't agree with it. One simple rule for a contraction and a possessive makes life o so much simpler. He's and she's doesn't sound right to me though so that is why I do conjugate them correctly. Other than it's, all the apostrophes appear to be legally correct in their parts of sentence, at least from where I'm standing.

Who's talking about "legal"?  We're trying to make some grammar corrections to make it look as if you care about what you write.  As you stated in the very front of the manuscript, you've been away from school for a while.  I'm almost 70 years old but I volunteer at a nearby elementary school three days a week and I make corrections and suggestions in cases such as this quite often.

Just because the book is about "amateur" radio doesn't mean it can't look and sound "professional".

I appreciate that and thank you for your suggestions. I will be taking them into consideration while I continue to write the book. I do acknowledge that I may use too many instances where apostrophes are needed. I look forward to other additions your keen eyes, and seasoned wisdom may offer in this piece of literature. However, you gave me a list of rules (which defines the legal use of apostrophes in the English language.) I was trying to tell you that I've only violated one of those rules and that it wasn't out of a mistake but out of personal preference. That is the conjugation of "it" to its possessive form. It drives me insane not to include an apostrophe in "its." Though "he", "she", and "it" follow the same grammar patterns in many languages, in English while "he" and "she" are changed to "his" and "her" to indicate possession, "it" retains its original spelling. This is why I cannot stand leaving out the apostrophe, as adding just an "s" to the end of any other word makes it plural and not possessive.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6055




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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2012, 03:36:10 AM »

It's come to the point now that if I start reading an article, letter, post, book, etc., and there are too many mistakes and spelling errors, I simply stop reading it. 

If the author couldn't be through enough to correct grammatical mistakes, there is even less chance that they've bothered checking for other mistakes--or even checking their facts.
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AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2012, 05:28:42 AM »

It's come to the point now that if I start reading an article, letter, post, book, etc., and there are too many mistakes and spelling errors, I simply stop reading it. 

If the author couldn't be through enough to correct grammatical mistakes, there is even less chance that they've bothered checking for other mistakes--or even checking their facts.

I haven't looked at the OP's manuscript, but I agree with CJS on this point.   An author's credibility suffers when he can't write simple correct English, IMO.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1812




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« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2012, 08:23:28 AM »

Re:K1CJS
                Does your" through" mean thorough?


« Last Edit: November 17, 2012, 08:37:08 AM by W1JKA » Logged
ONAIR
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Posts: 1747




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« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2012, 10:31:43 AM »

Hmmm, isn't there a computer program that can correct all of this stuff before it gets printed?
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W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1046




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« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2012, 11:41:17 AM »

Here's some advice for anyone wanting to learn about radio, amateur or otherwise: seek out a respected resource.

Robert Shrader's Electronic Communications is a classic, as is William Orr's Radio Handbook. The grammar is exact, the text is peer reviewed, the illustrations are suburb, and the publishers are top-notch. An amateur radio specific handbook, such as the American Radio Relay League's Handbook for Radio Communications, can explain anything many times better than anything on the Internet. In fact, the ARRL's web site lists a virtual library of books that outperform most information you will find online.

As we know, anyone can publish anything on the Internet, but that doesn't make it the gospel truth. Take what you see online with a grain of salt and a dose of skepticism.!

As for KI4JGT, I wish him luck.  With some polish, I think he could provide a viable resource that could aid others who are seeking information about obtaining their ham radio licenses. I just don't think he is going to do very well by misusing apostrophes and making his other grammatical mistakes. Most readers will see that something doesn't look right, and will conclude that his book is like a typical YouTube "fail."

Then again, I could be wrong (and I hope that I am). I do wish him luck--his heart is in the right place, and if he inspires only one new person to join us in our into our hobby, then that's great! More power to him!
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