Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wiring Reliance Transfer Switch for generator.  (Read 9064 times)
WB6DGN
Member

Posts: 619




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2012, 03:37:55 PM »

Quote
You may want to check with your utility co or coop, they may have requirements for inspecting generator transfer switch installations.  Some utilities do not allow any residential generator connections.

My city requires the standard $40 "building permit" for the transfer switch and, I'm sure, a utility company inspection.  NOT A PROBLEM.  I wouldn't even squawk too much if they required a licensed electrician to install the thing.  That IS serious business.  BUT, telling me that I CAN'T have backup power at my home?  THAT'S LAWSUIT TIME, BIG TIME!
Tom
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5905




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2012, 04:29:07 PM »

Quote
You may want to check with your utility co or coop, they may have requirements for inspecting generator transfer switch installations.  Some utilities do not allow any residential generator connections.

My city requires the standard $40 "building permit" for the transfer switch and, I'm sure, a utility company inspection.  NOT A PROBLEM.  I wouldn't even squawk too much if they required a licensed electrician to install the thing.  That IS serious business.  BUT, telling me that I CAN'T have backup power at my home?  THAT'S LAWSUIT TIME, BIG TIME!
Tom

I tackled this from a different "angle". I installed a sub panel many years ago to add circuits to house and shack. I have moved important circuits to it and transfer sub panel. Granted I do not have full house power but then I do have a more balanced load for generator. Main panels are usually 100 amp or more (mine is 200). With a 200 amp main they do not have to be very fussy about load balancing in a house and it is easy to have one 120 volt leg overloaded long before you reach two leg capacity of a generator. A 5k generator is basically a two 22 amp 120 volt feeds which is peanut on a 200 amp panel. If you do a whole house transfer realistically you should use a 10k or bigger for 40+amp support for each 120 volt leg. For what its worth....
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
W6EM
Member

Posts: 800




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2012, 05:57:59 PM »

I tackled this from a different "angle". I installed a sub panel many years ago to add circuits to house and shack. I have moved important circuits to it and transfer sub panel. Granted I do not have full house power but then I do have a more balanced load for generator. Main panels are usually 100 amp or more (mine is 200). With a 200 amp main they do not have to be very fussy about load balancing in a house and it is easy to have one 120 volt leg overloaded long before you reach two leg capacity of a generator. A 5k generator is basically a two 22 amp 120 volt feeds which is peanut on a 200 amp panel. If you do a whole house transfer realistically you should use a 10k or bigger for 40+amp support for each 120 volt leg. For what its worth....


Good points.  Most folks don't want to size an emergency generator to supply their whole house load.  Probably would amount to a 25KW machine, assuming whole house HVAC is tacked on.  The fuel to run the puppy at LPG prices wouldn't be cheap, even for a few hours.  So, move critical branch circuits to the sub panel and only transfer it to the generator.

A 60 Amp sub panel is about the smallest one can get for a low price.  The other cost factor is the transfer switch.  Not cheap.  As for the motor-starting problem with the furnace blower, the size of the generator has to be large enough to supply the starting inrush and not slow down.  Just a guess, but if it's a 3/4HP blower motor, the inrush would be almost 16A at 120V assuming a 300% inrush.

Last time I looked, a 200A transfer switch was about $300 or so.  And, that's for a manual switch.  A 60A one would be much more affordable.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!