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Author Topic: new Part 90 cert. Ht's and GMRS  (Read 7946 times)
KCJ9091
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« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2013, 08:05:18 AM »

Thanks,
This is the sentence I was looking for and it is in that rule:
"(Transmitters with frequency capability for the Amateur Radio Services and Military Affiliate Radio System will not be certificated.)"

This is the problem I have with that, I have on the desk an HT600.  Looking up the FCC ID it is approved for part 95.  The authorization list the frequency range as 403-512 MHz which included the 70 cm Amateur Band.  Is this not a conflict? 
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AA4PB
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« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2013, 08:50:42 AM »

I think the HT600 is "channel selection only". The commercial user doesn't have access to the ham band unless someone programs some channels that way with the software. That may be why it was certified.
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KS4VT
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Posts: 143




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« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2013, 04:09:33 PM »

Thanks,
This is the sentence I was looking for and it is in that rule:
"(Transmitters with frequency capability for the Amateur Radio Services and Military Affiliate Radio System will not be certificated.)"

This is the problem I have with that, I have on the desk an HT600.  Looking up the FCC ID it is approved for part 95.  The authorization list the frequency range as 403-512 MHz which included the 70 cm Amateur Band.  Is this not a conflict? 

Not at all...you can use it for both as long as you program it exactly the way the Part 95 rules requires it to.  The HT600 is not a Part 97 device, but many years ago GMRS was licensed as Part 90 frequencies and there are many organizations and businesses that still have actual Part 90 licenses assigned to these frequencies.
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2013, 04:48:44 PM »

Good, I can put his GMRS repeater, a GMRS simplex, the three ARES repeaters, and the backup ham simplex in one radio for one of the older guys who likes to keep things simple.
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KS4VT
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Posts: 143




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« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2013, 04:54:53 PM »

Good, I can put his GMRS repeater, a GMRS simplex, the three ARES repeaters, and the backup ham simplex in one radio for one of the older guys who likes to keep things simple.

Absolutely.  The only freqs you cannot put in are the frequencies that are dedicated to FRS that are narrowband or anything that no license is held for.
Shared GMRS/FRS freqs are perfectly OK.
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KB2VUQ
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Posts: 117


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« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2013, 06:47:47 PM »

KCJ9091,

While you can program 6 rf channels, just remember that an HT-600 can only
do three tone PLs and one DPL maximum. Hopefully, your application won't
involve more than that.

Another point of contention are the 2 tuning points in the front end that limit
the rx sensitivity with such a bandspread. Tuning the front end around 455-
456 mhz should provide decent rx, but don't expect miracles. 
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KCJ9091
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« Reply #21 on: January 01, 2013, 07:40:03 PM »

All three ARES machines have the same PL and the GMRS machine has no tone.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6061




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« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2013, 04:34:46 AM »

Thanks,
This is the sentence I was looking for and it is in that rule:
"(Transmitters with frequency capability for the Amateur Radio Services and Military Affiliate Radio System will not be certificated.)"

This is the problem I have with that, I have on the desk an HT600.  Looking up the FCC ID it is approved for part 95.  The authorization list the frequency range as 403-512 MHz which included the 70 cm Amateur Band.  Is this not a conflict?  

No, it isn't--at least as far as the FCC is concerned.  There are slivers of other services interspersed throughout that range, and their take on the matter seems to be that since ham equipment doesn't need such certification unless the radio is a mass produced one, and that radios sold by dealers for a certain service won't be used outside of the service that the radio is made for.

One other thing that was unsaid about the above is this:  "without modification".  In other words, radios originally made for use on ham and MARS frequencies.  

If you have the know-how, the parts and the time and equipment, radios made for use on one band can be modified for use on just about any other adjacent band in the amateur service.  A good example is the 220 mHz band--there was no commercial equipment ready made that could be simply modified for use on that band, yet there are repeaters that have been made out of commercial equipment that have been reparted and retuned to operate on that band.  Please note that I'm referring to the ham bands only when I say that commercial equipment can be reworked to operate on other bands--other HAM bands (part 97).

What you seem to be looking for is a strict set interpretation of the regs covering various radio services that do not conflict with other services.  That isn't going to happen, and since the FCC is the buck stops, so to speak, they can and do go and contradict themselves in different service regs--and then say that the contradiction is not a contradiction at all.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2013, 04:47:51 AM by K1CJS » Logged
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