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Author Topic: Is crossbanding between Amateur / GMRS legal?  (Read 15532 times)
KT0DD
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« on: December 15, 2012, 03:04:46 AM »

I'm looking at a Wouxun Commercial radio for me and a Powerwerx GMRS rig for my wife. The powerwerx GU-16 is a GMRS radio Part 95 certified. It will recieve 406-470 mhz. If I transmit on 70 cm and she recieves it and then she transmits on GMRS and I receive it ( basically working split ) Is it legal?

Todd - KT0DD

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NA4IT
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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2012, 04:30:24 AM »

In a nutshell, No, it's not legal. The FCC doesn't allow for cross services communication.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2012, 06:52:42 AM »

Sorry, but no.  She would still be putting a signal on the ham band, and since the ham rig isn't the entity that carries the license--the operator is--she would still be seen as illegally operating a ham rig through crossbanding.

It seems the simple answer to you is this:  If you want to talk to your wife, use GMRS only.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2012, 08:09:14 AM »

If KTØDD is transmitting on 70cm that's legal, if the wife transmits on a GMRS frequency that's legal.

This is probably a different way of saying the same thing, but KTØDD carrying on a one way 'conversation' might get into Part 97 issues with broadcasting or other prohibited transmissions. If you can both use GMRS that's an easy solution, might also consider talking the wife into studying for a Tech license. Then both of you could use a repeater.

35 questions, ain't no thing, some of us passed while only half awake and I understand that even a few blondes are licensed........................ [ ! ]
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Never change a password on a Friday                
KT0DD
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« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2012, 01:48:17 PM »

I guess cross banding wasn't the best description as she would only be transmitting on GMRS, not 70cm and I would recieve it on GMRS on my dual band ht , she would not be putting a signal on the amateur radio frequencies, only GMRS. I would only be transmitting on 70 cm and she would receive it on her GMRS radio.

 I'm just looking for a way not to have to buy and have 2 or 3 radios hanging from my belt.  it would be nice to have just one.

I can see where "grey areas" could be frowned upon by the FCC,  but I'm trying to be compliant.

Thank you for the answers.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2012, 02:53:28 PM »

Part 97.111(a)(3) Authorizes transmissions necessary to exchange messages with a station in another FCC-regulated service ** while providing emergency communications **. That implies that it is not authorized for non-emergency communications.
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AA4HA
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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2012, 04:48:53 PM »

35 questions, ain't no thing, some of us passed while only half awake and I understand that even a few blondes are licensed........................ [ ! ]

 Cheesy AA4HA = blonde = extra

-----------------------------
I know that you are trying to keep in compliance and I appreciate what you are saying but logistically if she puts out any sort of signal onto an amateur radio frequency it is in violation. That includes if the GMRS transmission is cross-band repeated into an amateur radio space. Really the violation would be on you as you are allowing someone to remotely operate equipment that is transmitting on the amateur bands. They could probably also say that it is in the same spirit as broadcasting (one way communications).

For you to identify on the amateur bands with your callsign (I hope people still do that) would also cause confusion. Your amateur radio callsign would appear on the GMRS frequencies where there is a completely different set of callsigns are being used. If she is a GMRS licensee (you are supposed to be) then when she identifies it is also going to be heard over the amateur radio frequencies. You can imagine the confusion.

Hope that helps,

Tisha, AA4HA (WQLJ327)
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
NI6G
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« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2012, 04:58:43 AM »

Pathetic.   Sad
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RFDOG
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« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2012, 07:35:55 AM »

Dick Bash started all this.  Sad
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K5LXP
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« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2012, 08:21:50 AM »

If "cross service" communications aren't legal, then under what rule does the Armed Forces Day event happen?

"The annual celebration features traditional military-to-amateur crossband communications SSB voice and Morse code tests. ... Participating military stations will transmit on selected military MARS frequencies and listen for Amateur Radio stations in the amateur bands. "

http://www.arrl.org/news/annual-armed-forces-day-crossband-test-scheduled-for-may-12

This isn't "emergency" communications, it's a special event.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K1CJS
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« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2012, 08:52:03 AM »

If "cross service" communications aren't legal, then under what rule does the Armed Forces Day event happen? ...... Participating military stations will transmit on selected military MARS frequencies and listen for Amateur Radio stations in the amateur bands. " ...... This isn't "emergency" communications, it's a special event.


Simply put, it IS NOT "cross service" since MARS is considered to be an extension of amateur radio closed to all amateurs who aren't a licensed MARS operator.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2012, 09:02:29 AM »

I'm looking at a Wouxun Commercial radio for me and a Powerwerx GMRS rig for my wife. The powerwerx GU-16 is a GMRS radio Part 95 certified. It will receive 406-470 MHz. If I transmit on 70 cm and she receives it and then she transmits on GMRS and I receive it ( basically working split ) Is it legal?

OK.  I get what you're trying to say.  You're going to be on a amateur frequency only and your wife is going to be on a GMRS frequency only.  It looks like it is legal--but for one thing.  You are transmitting on the amateur 70 cm band without anyone answering you on that band.  Likewise, your wife is transmitting on a GMRS band without anyone answering her on that band.  Transmitting without being answered is considered to be broadcasting--which is illegal on the amateur band, and,  if I'm not mistaken, the GMRS band as well.

As was already said, get GMRS radios for both of you--or ask your wife to get her ham ticket.  You can do as you suggest and never get caught, but if you do, you could well be facing some hefty fines as well as the loss of your license/licenses.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2012, 09:08:23 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K1CJS
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« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2012, 09:52:30 AM »

...35 questions, ain't no thing, some of us passed while only half awake and I understand that even a few blondes are licensed........................ [ ! ]

Cheesy AA4HA = blonde = extra

If the following posts were made in reference to the these first two--

Come on guys, if we can't laugh at ourselves....
 
Pathetic.   Sad

Dick Bash started all this.  Sad

And just FYI, I used to have a full head of brown hair, but now it's steel grey--and my hairline is losing a battle with my forehead.  It's one of two things.  Either I'm really bald and my grey matter is leaking out in strands--or the fertilizer (brain matter) that my hair used is running out!   Grin
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AA4PB
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« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2012, 10:34:31 AM »

If "cross service" communications aren't legal, then under what rule does the Armed Forces Day event happen?

Because there is a specific exception written into the rules for the Armed Forces Day event. At any other non-emergency time, military to amateur communications is not permitted.
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K1AVE
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« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2012, 11:59:34 AM »

As an aside, GMRS also requires a license. FRS does not.
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