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Author Topic: Thought this would be of interest to the folks fighting HOA/CCR's  (Read 20191 times)
AB4D
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Posts: 301


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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2013, 04:40:43 AM »

Simple matter of fact is: You can't avoid HOAs unless you are indepedently wealthy.

Well that certainly is not the case in the D.C. area.  There are just as many, if not more non-HOA properties than those with HOAs.  Pricing is more a matter of neighborhood, rather with or without an HOA.  However, HOA controlled communites in this area are usually more expensive because they are newer.


Therefore, the HOA problem is not one that can be totally avoided. You may only do your best to avoid it and sometime the choice boils down to living in a "safe" neighbor, driving 40 miles one way to work, or being without a livelyhood. You just make you choice. Sometimes (frequency varies) you just accept the HOA under extreme duress.

HOA's can easily be avoided, just don't move there. If you are a ham, make a choice about what's important to you. Spend a little extra time on the commute and enjoy any antenna system you want, or live in a new house close to work and put up with the HOA nonsense, begging some soccer moms for permission everytime you want to plant a tree, paint a board or put up an antenna, if they even let you.

I'd rather spend extra time on the road than putting up with someone telling me what I can and cannot do to my property.  Believe me, I lived that nightmare, never again.

73
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W6UV
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Posts: 540




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« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2013, 04:01:50 PM »

Simple matter of fact is: You can't avoid HOAs unless you are indepedently wealthy.

I disagree. It just takes patience and sometimes the willingness to compromise.

In my case, I lived in an HOA neighborhood for 20 years. No outside antennas allowed. It was a very nice neighborhood in an upscale area, but I eventually got tired of being restricted to stealth antennas and having to get a bunch of nosy busybodies (the HOA Board) to approve every little exterior change, even simple things like the color of a door.

When I decided I'd had enough, I spent five months scouring the area for something without restrictions. I was surprised at how many properties were available that didn't have restrictions. Sure, most of the new developments had CC&Rs, and most of the more interesting properties that didn't were older, but we're talking about houses built in the 1990's, not the 1920's.

I eventually found a place that would make most hams drool: a 5000 sq. ft. custom house on 10 acres on top of a ridge with views in most directions. No CC&Rs, no HOA, no restrictions of any kind, and very few neighbors. Sure, I had to make some compromises. For example, I'm not connected to city water -- I have two wells on the property and three 5000 gallon tanks for water storage. Maintaining the wells and pumps takes more effort than calling the local utility company when something goes wrong, but it's not too burdensome. Ditto for the propane tank and septic tank. In exchange, I have killer views, quiet solitude (the nearest neighbor is 1/4 mile away, so no RFI problems), and the ability to put up any kind of antenna I want.

I just finished my tower project a few months ago, and let me tell you, if all you've ever used on the HF bands is a ground-mounted vertical or low wire dipoles, you'd be shocked at the level of performance you get with a big yagi on a tower. Like night and day difference. With a low dipole, 20m might open a hour after sunrise and close an hour after sunset, but with the big yagi it's open 24 hours a day. The difference between calling for hours in a rare DX pile-up and working them on the first or second call. This made all of the effort to find the place, the move itself, and the work putting up the tower worthwhile.

And this is in the S.F. Bay Area, one of the most expensive housing markets in the country. I'm not by any means wealthy. I'm solidly middle class, and if I can do this, then anyone of similar means can -- it just takes determination and effort instead of sitting around and whinging about HOAs and how "unfair" they are.
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K0JEG
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Posts: 679




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« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2013, 06:31:00 AM »

Simple matter of fact is: You can't avoid HOAs unless you are indepedently wealthy.

I disagree. It just takes patience and sometimes the willingness to compromise.

In my case, I lived in an HOA neighborhood for 20 years. No outside antennas allowed. It was a very nice neighborhood in an upscale area, but I eventually got tired of being restricted to stealth antennas and having to get a bunch of nosy busybodies (the HOA Board) to approve every little exterior change, even simple things like the color of a door.

When I decided I'd had enough, I spent five months scouring the area for something without restrictions. I was surprised at how many properties were available that didn't have restrictions. Sure, most of the new developments had CC&Rs, and most of the more interesting properties that didn't were older, but we're talking about houses built in the 1990's, not the 1920's.

I eventually found a place that would make most hams drool: a 5000 sq. ft. custom house on 10 acres on top of a ridge with views in most directions. No CC&Rs, no HOA, no restrictions of any kind, and very few neighbors. Sure, I had to make some compromises. For example, I'm not connected to city water -- I have two wells on the property and three 5000 gallon tanks for water storage. Maintaining the wells and pumps takes more effort than calling the local utility company when something goes wrong, but it's not too burdensome. Ditto for the propane tank and septic tank. In exchange, I have killer views, quiet solitude (the nearest neighbor is 1/4 mile away, so no RFI problems), and the ability to put up any kind of antenna I want.

I just finished my tower project a few months ago, and let me tell you, if all you've ever used on the HF bands is a ground-mounted vertical or low wire dipoles, you'd be shocked at the level of performance you get with a big yagi on a tower. Like night and day difference. With a low dipole, 20m might open a hour after sunrise and close an hour after sunset, but with the big yagi it's open 24 hours a day. The difference between calling for hours in a rare DX pile-up and working them on the first or second call. This made all of the effort to find the place, the move itself, and the work putting up the tower worthwhile.

And this is in the S.F. Bay Area, one of the most expensive housing markets in the country. I'm not by any means wealthy. I'm solidly middle class, and if I can do this, then anyone of similar means can -- it just takes determination and effort instead of sitting around and whinging about HOAs and how "unfair" they are.

Every home purchase is a compromise of one sort or another. I could have bought a trailer out on a few acres with a well and septic system a 4WD truck to get me up the dirt driveway in the winter and given up Internet access, or I could have bought (and did buy) a well built home in a neighborhood that is retiree friendly (even though I'm at least 20 years from retirement, it's good to plan ahead sometimes), at a price that I can not only afford, I can actually improve the rest of my life. Looking around me now, I know I made the right choice, even if it means I have to limit my ham radio hobby. For most of my life I've lived in apartments that flat out prohibited any practical radio activity other than using an HT at home. Having access to the attic is a major improvement. Having a backyard that opens up to green space (but alas, no large trees yet) is another. And in a few years maybe my attitude will change, but for now the HF bands aren't my primary focus anyway. If I get a loaded vertical up in the backyard it will be good enough for me. As for installing a beam on a large tower, I'm just not all that into the hobby (or at least the HF bands) to make that kind of investment. I know plenty of people who do, and I'm sure it gives you a lot of satisfaction, but I also know a lot of people who have a great time running barefoot with wires in trees too.
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