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Author Topic: Hustler 6 BTV or Butternut HF-6V What would you go for ?  (Read 2293 times)
GI0EWP
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« on: December 18, 2012, 11:19:37 AM »

Hi to all you Hams out there , I have been off the air for 12 years and recently got the call again and bought a Yaesu Ft-857, Mydel Auto ATU and a Hygain 12AVQ . The 857 was too small and complicated and nothing like my beloved FT101ZD Mk 3 + all the extras and as such it and the Mydel had to go. It has been replaced by a FT-450 which I love , however although the Hy Gain 12AVQ works a treat I miss 40 and 80 meters . I now find myself twiddling my thumbs whether to go for a Hustler 6 BTV or a Butternut HF-6V as I can only put up a vertical at my location. I gather that both antenna,s can be a pain in the butt to set up and adjust without an analyser which I don,t have nor can,t justify the cost of one .. Are they really that hard to set up  ? . My last ? I already have a pole concreted ready for either antenna but it is about 6 feet from the pole that has the Hy Gain mounted on it. Will the Hustler or Butternut be affected by the closeness to the other vertical .. I am prepared to take the Hygain down if need be ... I have just today bought a MFJ 969 ATU as I like to see what,s happening outside even though the FT-450 has an Auto Atu .That,s it folks any advice would be very welcome.. Butternut or Hustler ? 
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K3VAT
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 01:44:19 PM »

Welcome back!

... I now find myself twiddling my thumbs whether to go for a Hustler 6 BTV or a Butternut HF-6V as I can only put up a vertical at my location.  ... Butternut or Hustler ?  

From what you have posted it will be a toss-up.  About 50% will say Butternut and 50% will say Hustler.  Just look at a dozen or so past postings on this subject to see what I mean. Use this: http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php?action=search

Both verticals have the same ratings (4.6) but you can analyze the reviewer's individual comments to help you decide.

  You didn't mention your specific operating goals: working the 'locals' or all-out DX'ing.  But neither antenna is really a 'pain-in-the-butt' to setup.  We set up our new Butternut out at Field Day within 45 minutes and that included laying down three dozen radials.

As also discussed in past postings on these two verticals is what are the parameters of your radial field.  In fact, many believe that this is the largest influencing factor for decent operation.  Either model will require a radial field.  What do you have in mind?

...  Will the Hustler or Butternut be affected by the closeness to the other vertical ..

You can't mount two HF verticals that close together without significant interaction.  Mostly likely neither would work properly.

GL, 73, Rich, K3VAT
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 02:33:58 PM by K3VAT » Logged
W9GB
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Posts: 2600




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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 06:44:56 PM »

Odd that you did not ask about adding to your Hy-Gain 12-AVQ.
http://www.hy-gain.com/pdffiles/AV-12AVQ.pdf

The HyGain 14-AVQ adds 40 meters
http://www.hy-gain.com/pdffiles/AV-14AVQ.pdf
and the 18-AVQ Series II adds 80 meters.
http://www.hy-gain.com/pdffiles/AV-18AVQII.pdf

The issue with 80 meter verticals is the limited bandwidth (< 100 kHz).
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 06:48:26 PM by W9GB » Logged
KB5UBI
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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 10:16:23 PM »

I had to make that exact decision when I decided to install a vertical as a back-up antenna. A few trusted experts recommended the 6 BTV and the HF-6V as the best performing verticals. With a bit of deliberation, I ended up going with the Butternut, installed at ground level over a field of radials. The Butternut is now my main antenna and not a back-up.

On 75 meters, changing frequency does require some retuning but it's worth it when you consider the performance. Daylight 75 meter local is better with my doublet, but beyond 100 miles, the Butternut shines.

 
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KA7NIQ
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 08:32:31 AM »

I had to make that exact decision when I decided to install a vertical as a back-up antenna. A few trusted experts recommended the 6 BTV and the HF-6V as the best performing verticals. With a bit of deliberation, I ended up going with the Butternut, installed at ground level over a field of radials. The Butternut is now my main antenna and not a back-up.

On 75 meters, changing frequency does require some retuning but it's worth it when you consider the performance. Daylight 75 meter local is better with my doublet, but beyond 100 miles, the Butternut shines.

 
I owned them both, and got the Butternut first. It actually scared the little boy next door, and made him Cry, every time he saw it!
So, I went for the Hustler. Over the same radial field, I did not notice any difference at all. The Hustler costs less, and is less of a contraption. It also has the cool DX Engineering Radial Plates for it. Either way, I think u will be happy, as long as u get a good radial field under them.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 10:09:18 AM »

If I had the option, I'd probably pick the Butternut.

Here's why (and really the only reason why):

With the Hustler, once it's up and vertical and attached, you can't reach the adjustments that tune it for 40m or 80m -- they're too high above ground.  The 40m adjustment is the length of aluminum tubing at the top of the antenna, below the 80m loading coil.  The 80m adjustment is the length of the whip above the 80m loading coil.  They're out of reach unless you have a very tall ladder or something.

The Butternut has its tuning adjustments at the bottom of the antenna, where they can be easily reached.

With a given radial field, they both work about the same.
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KA7NIQ
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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 08:40:48 PM »

If I had the option, I'd probably pick the Butternut.

Here's why (and really the only reason why):

With the Hustler, once it's up and vertical and attached, you can't reach the adjustments that tune it for 40m or 80m -- they're too high above ground.  The 40m adjustment is the length of aluminum tubing at the top of the antenna, below the 80m loading coil.  The 80m adjustment is the length of the whip above the 80m loading coil.  They're out of reach unless you have a very tall ladder or something.

The Butternut has its tuning adjustments at the bottom of the antenna, where they can be easily reached.

With a given radial field, they both work about the same.
Steve, These Mosley Vertical Antennas http://www.mosley-electronics.com/pages/series/rv.htm#rv6c really get my goat, if you know what I mean ? I hope I did the link right on this Forum ?

As you are probably well aware of, there seem to be several "Mosley Haters" in our ranks, ever since the Champion Radio tests. I am not one of them.
But Steve, have you ever checked out the PRICES Mosley wants for these things ?
These Mosley Trap Verticals cost nearly 4 Times as much as a Hustler or a Butternut!
WTF ?

Then, to further tick me off, Mosley tell us a full, or any kind of radial system is "not required"
Again, WTF  Huh




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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20547




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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 09:34:35 AM »

If I had the option, I'd probably pick the Butternut.

Here's why (and really the only reason why):

With the Hustler, once it's up and vertical and attached, you can't reach the adjustments that tune it for 40m or 80m -- they're too high above ground.  The 40m adjustment is the length of aluminum tubing at the top of the antenna, below the 80m loading coil.  The 80m adjustment is the length of the whip above the 80m loading coil.  They're out of reach unless you have a very tall ladder or something.

The Butternut has its tuning adjustments at the bottom of the antenna, where they can be easily reached.

With a given radial field, they both work about the same.
Steve, These Mosley Vertical Antennas http://www.mosley-electronics.com/pages/series/rv.htm#rv6c really get my goat, if you know what I mean ? I hope I did the link right on this Forum ?

As you are probably well aware of, there seem to be several "Mosley Haters" in our ranks, ever since the Champion Radio tests. I am not one of them.
But Steve, have you ever checked out the PRICES Mosley wants for these things ?
These Mosley Trap Verticals cost nearly 4 Times as much as a Hustler or a Butternut!
WTF ?

Then, to further tick me off, Mosley tell us a full, or any kind of radial system is "not required"
Again, WTF  Huh






"Do you believe in magic?" 

Great song, by the Lovin' Spoonful. Wink
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N8CMQ
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Posts: 353




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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2012, 09:51:01 PM »

If I had the option, I'd probably pick the Butternut.

Here's why (and really the only reason why):

With the Hustler, once it's up and vertical and attached, you can't reach the adjustments that tune it for 40m or 80m -- they're too high above ground.  The 40m adjustment is the length of aluminum tubing at the top of the antenna, below the 80m loading coil.  The 80m adjustment is the length of the whip above the 80m loading coil.  They're out of reach unless you have a very tall ladder or something.

The Butternut has its tuning adjustments at the bottom of the antenna, where they can be easily reached.

With a given radial field, they both work about the same.


Wow, I wish I knew all that when I got my Hustler years ago.
But putting it up and taking it down is how I tuned mine.
After three rebuilds and the mods, that old Hustler keeps getting better.
One of the biggest improvements for any vertical is lots of long radials,
at the moment, I have 125 1/8 wave radials for 80 meters.
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