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Author Topic: key speed  (Read 452 times)
VK4TJF
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Posts: 94




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« on: January 17, 2009, 07:04:57 AM »

i have been operating using a begali paddle now for a little over a year now and i'm up to about 30 WPM. i really interested in learning to operate a straight key as im also interested in antiques and how they used to do things. simple question for those that operate straight keys, what is your sending speed?
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K1BXI
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2009, 08:49:58 AM »

It varies for one's wrist dexterity, and for me, at age 74 it's around 15 wpm now, but back when I took the extra exam here in the US 30 years ago I did 20 wpm at the FCC office. If you do a good clean 15 at the start, I would say that would be very good.

John



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KC2MJT
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Posts: 59




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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2009, 09:06:15 AM »

I find 15-18 comfortable, but have little endurance with a straight key at any speed beyond 1/2 hour of operating without a nice long break. Above 20 wpm is where I stop and move back to my Begali Pro paddles. The straight key is fun, and I believe improves my iambic keying.

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K0OD
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Posts: 2558




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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2009, 11:55:24 AM »

Nearly 40 years ago I timed myself around 25 wpm with a J-38 straight key but that was very forced, utterly exhausting and I was a LOT younger. I think 25 wpm was considered about as fast as most hams could send <<<well>>> with a straight key.

When I was 16 years old I had moved on to a much better keying device, a very early commercial electronic keyer that used 4 triode tubes.  

That keyer, and my Colling 75A2 receiver, were my proudest possessions back then.

 
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K0OD
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2009, 12:18:08 PM »

K4BXI said "I took the extra exam here in the US 30 years ago I did 20 wpm at the FCC office."


I forgot about that. I took my extra sending test in a room full of QLF newbies who were hoping only to squeak past 13 WPM and then run out and buy HTs.

There was total silence and then a look of admiration from all the on-lookers as I sent darn good 20+ WPM Morse.

(now if only my wife/kids gave me that same look occasionally...)
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9V1VV
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Posts: 33




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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2009, 05:22:19 AM »

James,

Most people would agree that 15-20 wpm is a good steady speed to aim for on straight key. The maximum speed that can be sent by most ops without lots of errors creeping in is 28 wpm or thereabouts, and then it starts to hurt after 15 minutes or so...

There is a regular FISTS East Asia net on 14054 KHz
( +/- QRM)on Sundays at 0800 UTC with a few guys practicing straight keys and bugs.

Would be great to hear you...

73 de John 9 V 1 V V in Singapore
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KF6OCI
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Posts: 104




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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2009, 02:35:36 PM »



Those that are trying to go fast have the least to say
thats worth listening to.

  Dan
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WB4IUY
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Posts: 136


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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2009, 03:51:46 PM »

"Most people would agree that 15-20 wpm is a good steady speed to aim for on straight key. The maximum speed that can be sent by most ops without lots of errors creeping in is 28 wpm or thereabouts, and then it starts to hurt after 15 minutes or so..."

WOw...ain't that the truth! I still play with my J-38 from time to time, but mostly use an iambic keyer for CW. Gotten lazy and use a keyboard on an old Hal Telereader now, a lot easier on the wrist/head :-)

Dave WB4IUY
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