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Author Topic: E N instead of R  (Read 524 times)
DG3YCC
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Posts: 28




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« on: February 15, 2009, 10:31:54 AM »

When some ops want to send an R (instead of OK or so) they pause after the first dit and so it sounds like
E N. This is confusing especially for newcomers. Even oldtimers should monitor their cw from time to time i think.

73 de Chris
(with 3 years of cw still beginner...)
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N3EF
Member

Posts: 247




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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2009, 02:18:25 PM »


  This seems to be a fairly common thing with people using straight keys. I hear it alot myself but have no explanation for it.

Eric N3EF
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WU1E
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2009, 04:42:08 PM »

I've caught myself doing this a couple of times because I have heard it so often. To me, it just has a cool sound to it, kinda musical in a "this is fun" kind of way. Never really confused me because it was only done after the exchange was turned over but I can see how it could be confusing. I will be sure to not do it anymore. As rookies we tend to mimic what he hear, kinda like infants learning to speak I suppose.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20540




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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2009, 06:58:36 PM »

Who cares?

I don't bother sending "R" at all, because it's self-evident: Either I copied solid, or I didn't.  If I didn't, I ask for fills or repeats of anything important.

If I didn't miss anything important, refer back to first question: "Who cares?"

WB2WIK/6
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KB1OOO
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Posts: 214


WWW

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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2009, 08:11:57 PM »

Chris, I disagree.  I think that things like "EN" instead of "R" are part of the traditions and customs that make cw interesting to learn.  It really shouldn't be all that distressing to hear as a newb.  I was missing plenty of other stuff and doing just fine.

73,
Marc
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NB8N
Member

Posts: 12




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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2009, 03:35:49 AM »

Yes, this practice puts a squeak in my sneakers at times, especially after copying perfectly sent code at 35 + WPM.  Last night I answered a CQ on 80-Meters and the guy was only going about 18 WPM, but until I got used to his "musical style," I missed half of what he was sending.  For instance, an "L" came out as: dit-dahhhhhhhhhhhhh-dit-dit.  With head copy I was hearing AI.  
Anotherthingthatpopsmyrivetsiskeyboardsendingwithnospacebetweenwords.

73,
Bob  --  NB8N
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2754




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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2009, 10:38:45 AM »

Back in the bug days, I used to hear (and send) the "E N" pattern as the very first thing when replying to the guy on the other end after he turned it back to me.  Sort of like an emphatic "Rah Jer" on voice.

It never persisted past that first "E N" on any transmission.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2520




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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2009, 04:30:14 PM »

I know that I sometimes have trouble sending just one letter especially when my "wrist" isn't warmed up, an increasingly common situation.

W1XYZ: Copy?
K0OD: e n (or perhaps ae) Either way, he'll understand PERFECTLY.

I find that certain keying combinations are like tongue twisters. For example: If I say "Swiss wristwatches" you can bet I'll insert an extra space between those words. I sometimes do the same thing on CW (Ever work an HH5 on CW?)

The ARRL operating manual (or similar national guides) isn't the only source for good procedure. Morse was in its 7th decade when little Hiram Percy pounded his first key.

 
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2528




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« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2009, 09:14:37 PM »

Dit Dahhhhhhhh dit was pretty common in the Novice portions, along with KN (Known Novice).

Seems as if CW stood up to tons of Novices butchering it then--it will probably survive now if someone is sending e a for r.

Maybe they are sending an abv for Enjoyed All (you sent?)

73
Bob

PS: at least they aren't sending OMG!
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N9GXA
Member

Posts: 119




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« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2009, 08:23:58 AM »

> PS: at least they aren't sending OMG!

  I think this WILL happen. I recv'd an "LOL" awhile back and while I still have my morse code training wheels on again, thought that was a sign that the next generation was meshing within the ranks.

  Maybe not a bad thing if it's just their habit as new ops can keep the mode alive. I guess the other op just assumed I would know what that meant. I actually did, but the LOL is one of the more popular ones, too.

73 - Paul - N9GXA
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




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« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2009, 11:32:55 AM »

Every living language develops a jargon, a slang, even locational "accents".  

Younger hams never experienced copying the old "Great Lakes Swing" CW, done with a bug and elongated the dashes to unbelievable lengths.  A hard copy at first to say the least.  But there was a good reason behind that CW "accent" -- the noise levels and static they had to contend with.  Once you learned how to copy the Swing CW, you did indeed find that there was less need to ask for a repeat or worse yet, just sit there like a bump on a log and miss copy.  

An EN for an R?  

Ain't that big of a deal, get over it.  

I thought you young cats were all about celebrating diversity?  

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WU1E
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2009, 09:48:02 AM »

If diversity on CW is a good thing, then maybe I am just too used to SSB. Maybe that's why it appeals to me. I am too used to phone and everyone complaining about everyone else.

Reminds of a time recently when I stopped to ask a question to a couple guys ragchewing on 1845. When done, a guy who I have spoken to before comments loudly that I shouldn't be talking in the dx sub-band. I took it to heart only to hear him ragchewing with his friends (not dx) on the same frequency a couple of nights later. Oh well...


Thanks for the input. I do enjoy hearing about traditions going back to the telegraph days but glad
we can evolve also.
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