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Author Topic: There's something really wrong when.....  (Read 6273 times)
AB5S
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Posts: 4




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« on: December 22, 2012, 07:50:44 AM »

There's something really wrong when Kenwood 520 and 920s
(or any other "plastic" radio) is considered a "boatanchor."

I think it might be "I'm getting old" disease!   Grin Grin Grin
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2012, 08:37:25 AM »

Apparently our boats, like our automobiles, have been getting smaller and smaller...
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KB2WIG
Member

Posts: 114




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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2012, 11:03:37 AM »

Well......  Si is sand isn't it Huh? ??.


klc
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4356




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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2012, 01:23:57 PM »

How old to be a 'Boat Anchor'? The FT102 is at least 25 or more years old and has a tube PA and driver - isn't that a 'Boat Anchor'?

And the RF performance is still competitive provided the operator has some nouse, switches out the pre-amp,  and isn't a complete lid...
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AC5UP
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Posts: 3822




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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2012, 02:07:57 PM »

.............you say that like it's possible.

Set all knobs fully to the right and start calling CQ!
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Never change a password on a Friday                
KC9VZB
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Posts: 45




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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2012, 07:54:18 AM »

I've been fooling around with the kenwood 520 for a while.it receives and transmits for a while.The drake tr3,a real boat anchor spends most of its time waiting for tubes not much fun in that.It receives a little with vfo having little affect.Manual says just because a tube checks good doesn't mean it will work.So 2 or 3 at a time it gets new tubes.I guess I'll have to dust off signal generator if that doesn't work.300 watts would be great.
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AB5S
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2012, 08:12:36 AM »

re: Drake TR-3
It may not be that all the tubes are bad.
I've seen some abused rigs,
 but never one where all the tubes were bad.
A TR-3 is a fine rig, but many things get old besides tubes,
especially capacitors and high-value resistors.
Gets worse if someone has had a "diddle stick" in it.
Is there a reliable tech available to take a look at it?
Ask around for recommendations.  Most ham communities
have one or two guys that get a rep for knowing
at least something about fixing boatanchors.
Good Luck,
D.S.
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KC9VZB
Member

Posts: 45




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« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2012, 08:59:02 AM »

Threr'd be no fun in someone else fixing it.I'm new to ham but I have allot of experience restoring old radios.I had over 300 tube radios at height of my illness.I'm allot better now,and only have a few. To me its more fun to puzzle a thing out and maby learn sonething new.Once a radio is working,it goes on the shelf.I enjoy the pursuit more than the end.I just got a kenwood 450sat to use if I just want to get on the air.Theres a chart in manual showing resistances at tube sockets.I haven't done that yet.I'll take a look at the high value resistors.I replaced a couple of caps,but its far from being re-capped. 
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4742




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« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2012, 11:22:14 AM »

The boatanchor requirements seem to be shifting. I always thought of them as tube radio, with weight. Then you got the smaller tube radios of the 1960's. The the hybrid radios with tube finals. I am not seem some transistor radios that can be boatanchors, like the Zenith Royal 3000. That is a huge transistors radio. And now with surface mount components, the transistor radios appears to be heading in the direction of boatanchors.
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W2WDX
Member

Posts: 188




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« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2012, 03:58:11 PM »

Essentially I define a "boatanchor" as any radio where all the stages are vacuum tube. Hybrids like the FT-101 and such do not fall into this category.

First of all they are lightweight in relation. Take a radio like a Hallicrafters HT-37, it weighs probably 3 times a FT-101. It also isn't a transceiver, just a transmitter. I could certainly tie a rope around it, throw it overboard and use it to hold my 26' sailboat in place. I think an FT-101 would drag along the bottom. HiHi!!!

Essentially, if it is all tube it's a boatanchor. If it has any transistors it is not. It's not a matter of age, something can vintage but not be a boatanchor. It's not even really a matter of weight. A Gonset Communicator could be considered a boatanchor.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2012, 04:01:21 PM by W2WDX » Logged

K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5850




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« Reply #10 on: December 25, 2012, 06:55:53 AM »

The younger you are, the more the definition of boat anchor shifts.  Myself, I consider that a rig that has ANY tubes in could well be considered a boat anchor.  It depends on how long you've been in the hobby too.

Weight?  Heck, my standby rig--an all transistor Kenwood TS130-SE is heavy compared to some of the newer rigs with a lot more capabilities, but I don't consider it a 'boat anchor.'
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N8CMQ
Member

Posts: 353




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« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2012, 11:24:02 AM »

If you need a special desk just to hold the radios, you might have boat anchors...
Try Hallicrafters HT-32 and SX-101, 70+ pounds each, boat anchor material.
In the past, boat anchors were 6 foot rack cabinets with discrete modules for
the exciter, modulator, amp, and power supply.
Or, as I once had, a 'portable' 75 meter rig with a 100 pound dynamotor power
supply to run the receiver/transmitter/antenna tuner unit.
But for our younger generation, FT-101s and other hybrid radios might be boat
anchors, due to their age, and they have tubes.
It seems every generation has their own definition for boat anchor.
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WN2C
Member

Posts: 428




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« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2012, 02:09:38 PM »

How about the difficulty in getting parts?  Any radio that you have to canabalize another for parts must surely be a boat anchor.  It is getting that way with transistors.  They don't have NOS availability like tubes.

WDX: is a Heathkit HW 16 a boat anchor?  It it all tubes but for some silicon diodes and a transistor that does the switching for xmit/rcv

73
Rick  wn2c
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N8CMQ
Member

Posts: 353




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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2012, 10:34:09 AM »

How about the difficulty in getting parts?  Any radio that you have to canabalize another for parts must surely be a boat anchor.  It is getting that way with transistors.  They don't have NOS availability like tubes.

WDX: is a Heathkit HW 16 a boat anchor?  It it all tubes but for some silicon diodes and a transistor that does the switching for xmit/rcv

73
Rick  wn2c

The rig I started with a few decades ago...
It served me well as a novice.
Can you use substitute transistors like NTE?
Or use Partsbase to find your parts?
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K5HFG
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2012, 01:08:01 PM »

I take exception to your classifying the Hybrids as plastic radios. Although, I would not call them boat anchors. They are Hybrid
radios.

73,
Don K5HFG
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