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Author Topic: DXCC Countries List and Beam Headings  (Read 9934 times)
AB4D
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« on: December 22, 2012, 06:14:25 PM »

Does anyone know where I can obtain a DXCC countries list with accurate beam headings?  I tried the one available at the North Jersey DX association web site, but the beam headings are inconsistent with an Azimuth Map centered on my location.

As an example, the list generated by the NJDX site, gives the UK as 311 short path and 131 long path.  However, the map indicates that the UK is 50 degrees short path 230 degrees long path.  Hawaii on the list is given as 51 degrees short path and 231 long path, but the Azimuth map shows 280 short path and 100 degrees long path.   

I doubled checked the location data I input on the form, but on another site (that appears to use the same generator) the end result was the same. Maybe I was doing something wrong, I'm not sure.  Thanks

73
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K7MH
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Posts: 339




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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2012, 06:41:54 PM »

Many logging programs will show the beam heading (some both long and short path) when you enter the callsign of the DX.
Unless you have quite a few elements on a rather long boom, you only have to be kinda close most of the time.
Eventually you will just know what the most used beam headings are.
Headings for your specific location are going to have to be made up yourself. Maybe there is some software out there that would help.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2813




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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2012, 07:01:03 PM »

K7MH is spot on.  If your typical 3 or 4 ACTIVE element beam is within 30 degrees or so of "correct", you'll have no problems.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
VA3GUY
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Posts: 191




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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2012, 08:08:30 PM »

Here is a great little program I found that helps me find direction:

http://www.kawauchi.homeip.net/KawAZ/KawAZen/index.html

Hope this helps...
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2392




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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2012, 11:28:30 PM »

Does anyone know where I can obtain a DXCC countries list with accurate beam headings?  I tried the one available at the North Jersey DX association web site, but the beam headings are inconsistent with an Azimuth Map centered on my location.

As an example, the list generated by the NJDX site, gives the UK as 311 short path and 131 long path.  However, the map indicates that the UK is 50 degrees short path 230 degrees long path.  Hawaii on the list is given as 51 degrees short path and 231 long path, but the Azimuth map shows 280 short path and 100 degrees long path.   
. . .
73

For the places you quote, from New Jersey, the map is right, the generated list is wrong (_very_ wrong!).

HOWEVER:

The headings for your two cases (from the list) are roughly correct if your path is reversed -- that is, they're correct headings for Hawaii-to-NJ, and UK-to-NJ.

. . . Could you have reversed "From:" and "To:" locations?

.            Charles

PS -- there is no simple rule that converts "A to B" heading into "B to A" heading.

PPS -- if you want to know the heading for your location to any _particular_ DX, I suggest installing N1MM Logger.   It'll give you a beam heading as soon as you enter the DX's callsign.

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K2DC
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« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2012, 03:27:16 AM »

Another source of short-path beam headings is QRZ.com.  Just look up the station and click on the "Detail" tab.  The short-path beam heading from your location will be shown, and for long-path just subtract that number from 360.  And if your actual beam heading is within 30 degrees, you're in the zone.

73,

Don, K2DC

 
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W5FYI
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« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2012, 04:34:56 AM »

Yes, the headings you see are the headings from the UK to your QTH, or from Hawaii to you. Check the "to" and "from" options to reset the program to show your bearings to the DX stations. GL
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13335




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« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2012, 08:14:03 AM »

Quote from: K2DC

... The short-path beam heading from your location will be shown, and for long-path just subtract that number from 360...
 


Not quite.  There should be 180 degrees between the long and short path headings (though
the calculated heading isn't always the one that the RF takes.)

So if you had a short path bearing of 200 degrees, then 360 - 200 = 160 degrees is NOT the
proper long path bearing.

Rather you want to add (or subtract) 180 degrees from the short path bearing to get the
nominal long path bearing.
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N7SMI
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Posts: 341




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« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2012, 08:53:21 AM »

Rather you want to add (or subtract) 180 degrees from the short path bearing to get the nominal long path bearing.

A couple quick tricks taught to pilots to get reciprocal headings...

If you can subtract 2 from the first digit, do so, then add 2 to the second digit. If you can't subtract 2 from the first digit, add 2 instead, then subtract 2 from the second digit.

For example, take a heading of 275. You can subtract 2 from the first digit, to get 075, then add 2 to the second digit to get 095. The reciprocal of 275 is 95.

Next 62 (think 062). You can't subtract 2 from 0 without going negative, so add 2 instead to get 262, then subtract 2 from the second digit to get 242. Reciprocal of 62 is 242.

Once you figure it out, you can do reciprocals in your head almost instantaneously.

The second approach (which is more complicated to me) is to either add 200 and then subtract 20, or subtract 200 then add 20. Whichever one of these results in a heading between 0 and 360 is correct.
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K9MRD
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Posts: 331




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« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2012, 02:00:52 PM »

     if   shortpath<180

            longpath=180+shortpath

          else

            longpath=shortpath-180
       
     endif
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4799




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« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2012, 02:54:31 PM »

HRD will show you beam headings if you have a QRZ subscription. I think Hamcall may do the same.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1765




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« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2012, 03:28:17 AM »

Question: Do most hams apply their local E/W variation when initially setting up their beam and rotator direction indicator?
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K2DC
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« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2012, 04:13:44 AM »

Here, I rarely bother with the declination.  The offset is only 13 degrees, and with a typical tribander beamwidth of 60 degrees it's not worth worrying about.

73,

Don, K2DC

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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2407




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« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2012, 09:08:32 AM »

DX Atlas from Afreet Software is nice.  It is freeware, with nice accessories for propagation.

www.dxatlas.com
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WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13335




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« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2012, 09:21:19 AM »

It probably is worthwhile correcting for magnetic declination if it is more than 10 degrees or so
in your area, though for much of the Eastern US it probably doesn't matter much.  In many
cases it is no more effort (especially if you are in a town with streets laid out N / E / S / W.)

When I worked in southeast Alaska the magnetic declination was 32 degrees, and it gets worse as
you go further North.


While the half power beamwidth of a 3-element yagi might be +/- 30 degrees, most hams working
DX aren't going to be satisfied with being down an extra 3dB in a pileup.  Generally +/- 10 degrees
will get you within half a dB of maximum.  (Assuming that propagation is actually following the
calculated path, which isn't always the case, especially for polar paths.)
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