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Author Topic: Definition of QRP DX ??  (Read 8011 times)
W1JKA
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Posts: 1613




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« on: September 18, 2013, 07:00:43 AM »

   I would like to hear the generally accepted definition (opinion) of qrp/dx. For example would 1,000 miles per watt be considered dx if within the confines of CONUS or is it only contacts outside of CONUS. Thanks
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NU4B
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2013, 07:34:13 AM »

Normally DX is considered "outside" the country (I assume we are talking about HF). Canada and Mexico are DX, although it may not seem like it to us in the US. And QRP is generally accepted as 10 watts PEP, 5 watts CW. So there you have it. But I could be in Miami work out 500 miles with a half watt and contact many DX countries. On the other hand, I could be in Kansas and contact 2 or 3. So 1000 miles/watt is 1000 miles/watt - congrats!

As seen in forum topics, QRP and DX definitions are in the eye of the beholder.

If I'm running 50mW and I contact the west coast, who the heck cares what they call it, I'm a happy QRPer.
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WB4TJH
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2013, 07:44:07 AM »

For practically all the contests or awards I know of, OFFICIAL qrp is considered to be 5 watts max for CW and 10 watts PEP for SSB. QRPP  CW, I believe, is less than ONE watt. But for everyday operating, qrp is defined generally as "low power" so interrupt that for yourself. If you usually run a KW, then 100 watts, under that general definition, is qrp. I routinely use my K2 at 10 to 12 watts for both cw and ssb operating and don't worry about the contest definition of "qrp". Compared to my usual station capable of running 500 watts, 10 to 12 watts out is QRP. I'm primarily a rag chewer and don't worry about contest rules. Any way you look at it, 10 watts, either cw or ssb, qualifies under the general definition of qrp, as QRP.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2013, 10:52:58 AM »

DX is contact outside the country. Period.

QRP has no 'official' definition, but is generally considered to be 5w for CW and 10w for voice.   Contest and award sponsors may define it any way they wish.
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WB0FDJ
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Posts: 131




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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2013, 11:58:05 AM »

I like NU4B's comments. On the one hand you have the "official" definition. On the other hand, as he says, you have guys running QRPp measured in tens or hundreds of milliwatts. If they get three states over they've had a very good day. I think thats why the QRP ARCI started the 1000mile/watt award.

This topic comes up from time to time. While I personally subscribe to the official definitions for purposes of awards and contests, being a QRPer has for me become more of a state of mind than anything else. It's taught me that running my humongous 20 watts out of the old Argo V is more than enough for casual operating. It's also taught me that getting the Rockie's out to play is not an exercise in futility and the 700 or so milliwatts can more often than not result in some fun contacts. It's helped me be a better operator, keeping my CW sharp, listening better, learning how to find good contacts instead of just parking somewhere and calling CQ. Just glad I discovered the whole QRP scene in my earlier days.

Doc WB0FDJ
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2013, 02:03:20 PM »

Quote from: WB0FDJ

...On the one hand you have the "official" definition.



Which, of course, varies a lot.  I remember when the power limit for the QRP category in
the ARRL contests was 200W.

As a Novice in California, "DX" meant working the 7th call area, even though Reno was
only 100 miles away.

In practice, "DX" is whatever you feel pushes the limits of your equipment, operating, etc.;
what you feel good about accomplishing.  Specific awards and contests may have rules
that apply to those events, but the overriding rule is to have fun.
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W1VT
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« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2013, 03:29:54 PM »

One of my best DX contacts was working West Virginia on 10GHz running 3 watts to an 18 dish over a 400 mile path from beach in Connecticut.  It was state number 9.  State number 10 was K1WHS in Maine.

Zack Lau W1VT
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W1JKA
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« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2013, 05:02:03 PM »

Re: W1VT

   Maine is DX for a lot of hams, Dave K1WHS  qth is Lebanon and my qth is China. Huh
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WX7G
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« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2013, 05:10:05 PM »

There are few contests where QRP SSB is defined as more than 5 watts. No ARRL, CQ, NCJ contest defines QRP as 5 watts for any mode.
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F8WBD
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Posts: 61




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« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2013, 06:18:31 AM »

As has been previously stated, DX (for a USA operator), is outside the USA. In Europe (for a Euro operator), it is outside the continent and the UK.

France to Finland is not DX.

Having said that, it becomes a question of standards we set for ourselves. When running 5 watts, or less,  to a short and low wire, as I do, I consider a 20-meter CW France to Finland contact as darn-decent "DX"...as I did this AM with a QSO into the most northern point in Finland. When in northern NYS and operating under the same conditions, I consider a contact with southern Florida "DX".

Equipment is also a factor. I know my HW-9 does not have the sensitivity and selectivity of a KX-3. More to add to the equation.

I think we have to take charge and set our own private definitions and respect our own personal accomplishments. Cheesy
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W8GP
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Posts: 189




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« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2013, 09:50:56 AM »

For me it's a personal definition based on power level and how often I've done it.The first time I work a given distance I might consider it DX, but after that becomes commonplace I either increase the distance or reduce the power. I also take frequency into account, I place more value in a contact on 160 or 80 than one on 10. If I'm running a full 5 watts on the higher frequencies I use the same defination of DX as everyone else.
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VE3WMB
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Posts: 282




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« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2013, 08:31:05 PM »

I personally won't respond to a US station calling CQ DX as I don't think most American Hams would
consider Canada DX. I think that when most people think DX, they are thinking a different continent
at least on HF (VHF and above is a different story) regardless of power levels.

Michael VE3WMB 

As has been previously stated, DX (for a USA operator), is outside the USA. In Europe (for a Euro operator), it is outside the continent and the UK.
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