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Author Topic: Small Auxiliary Power Supply  (Read 1841 times)
AK4SK
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Posts: 150




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« on: January 08, 2013, 10:19:38 AM »

It seems like most if not all ham gear does not include a power supply. I'm looking for ideas for a small 12V power supply to supply auxiliary equipment such as external meters, meter lights, antenna switches, etc. Also, how do you go about connecting equipment that has a DC jack instead of a terminal? I'd prefer not to have a separate power supply or wall wart for each device. There are a lot of different power supply options but the last thing I want to do is add noise to my shack from a noisy power supply. My only requirements are low electrical noise, low ambient noise (from fans), and the ability to hookup multiple and different types of equipment with different connection requirements. 

Thanks,
Chris
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12665




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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2013, 10:41:01 AM »

Take a look at rigrunner: http://www.powerwerx.com/powerpole-power-distribution/
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AK4SK
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Posts: 150




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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2013, 10:42:28 AM »

Thanks, that is what I'm looking for.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5850




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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2013, 10:38:40 AM »

Keep your eyes open at yard sales for 12 volt power supplies that were sold by the hundreds years ago for the then CB craze.  These supplies are more or less mostly quiet and are rated at around 4 to 5 amps--ideal for auxiliary equipment.

Aux. equipment that has a wall wart that delivers 12 volts for a power supply already has the cord and connector you need.  Simply cut the cord off--AFTER identifying the positive and the negative leads if those aren't marked on the piece of equipment--and use those leads to connect to your new power supply.

Something that is going to be making a resurgence--in my humble opinion--is the conversion of computer power supplies to power those items, simply because more and more of them are leaving the 12 volt standard and moving to a five volt (that's the voltage level of the USB connector feed) standard.  To find out how to convert a computer power supply, (supplies from older computers with a hard on/off switch are easier to convert) just search for that subject in any search engine.  73!

Added--Something Radio Shack is still good for are their power connectors and associated wiring, or just the solder on connectors themselves, although those don't have the wide selection that the others have.
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AK4SK
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Posts: 150




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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2013, 10:41:56 AM »

Thanks, I've already found a good cheap supply. It's 12A which is more than I need but it was a good deal.

73,
Chris AK4SK
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