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Author Topic: Why do some hams mimic the accents of their DX targets?  (Read 2820 times)
K5TED
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« on: December 25, 2012, 08:44:11 AM »

Quite often, I'll hear a U.S. ham calling or answering a European station, using an affected manner of speech, and emulating the accent of whichever DX station he is trying to contact.

I say "emulating", because further down in the QSO the U.S. ham completely loses that foreign accent affectation and ends up sounding "normal" for his region of the U.S.

What's up with that? Is that sort of akin to the cliché "Ugly American" tendency to speak slowly and loudly to non-English speakers, expecting that they will better understand him?
 
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W2IRT
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2012, 09:51:03 AM »

Oh this annoys me to no end. I also don't why anybody who was born/raised in North America and who speaks only American-accented English in their normal life would ever use the phrase "many many QRM", also, as you say, in a faux-accent. This one makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end. That's right up there with "Roger that," "Please copy", "On the side" and other similar bits of linguistic gibberish.
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AF3Y
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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2012, 12:45:05 PM »

Just use CW, and bingo...... no accent problem. (Even tho I have heard CW with a bit of a drawl Roll Eyes)

73, Gene AF3Y
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2012, 02:26:46 PM »

Agreed.  Just because a certain affect is present from a foreign operator...this does not make sense for native speakers to talk that way.

On another note, I was able to break through the pileups for 3C6 and 3C0 by calling them phonetically in Spanish.  Now, my accent is pretty thick and Americanized (someone from El Salvador once said I had an Italian accent to my Spanish!).  But Elmo the op this year was from Spain.  He was probably laughing so hard at my attempts, that he decided to return my call.  DX IS!
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W2IRT
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« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2012, 10:05:46 PM »

Oh, hell I do the same thing. I speak just enough French to order dinner and get slapped, but when I work French stations inevitably I'll drop into French briefly (or call DXpeditions with F ops). cinquante-neuf cinq, bonne chance; a bientot. That, to me, is fair and part of the game. Ditto a Danke to DL's and other thanks/goodbyes to JAs, Russians, etc. Part of the fun.
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N2RJ
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 11:57:55 AM »

I speak Spanish to Spanish speaking ops from time to time but that's because I have a good enough knowledge of the language to order dinner and strike up a conversation (well, I am quite good now because I speak with people in Spanish on a daily basis now).

The "American Accent" is not my native one but I speak that way after years of living in the USA.
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NU1O
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2012, 03:21:48 PM »

This is something I have not observed.  Is this widespread or isolated cases?

I also try to give basic greetings, such as thank you, see you later, etc., in various languages but that's not what the author is writing about. 

I took Latin in HS and other than with some official from the Vatican I don't think I will be using it on the air - even if I could remember enough.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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NU1O
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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2012, 03:27:24 PM »

Just use CW, and bingo...... no accent problem. (Even tho I have heard CW with a bit of a drawl Roll Eyes)

73, Gene AF3Y

The Europeans tap out CQ CQ pse K and most Americans leave out the please. Are our European colleagues more polite than we are and would that be an "accent" if we used it?  It usually is a sure-fire way to determine if the station is domestic or foreign.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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N3QE
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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2012, 03:41:16 PM »

Even in CW, the callers do best if they take on the style of the CQ'er. I'm not surprised it happens on phone too.

IF he calls slow, I'll answer slow. If he calls fast, I'll answer fast. If his CQ is short and simple, my reply will be short and simple. If his CQ is longwinded... well, assuming I don't lose patience, I'll at least send my call twice.

If he's doing the full-blown MYCALL HISCALL blah blah MYCALL HISCALL then I'll throw in a HISCALL MYCALL at least. Maybe there's some QRM he hears but I don't and he wants to make sure we're actually talking to each other.

If he repeats everything twice then I'll repeat everything twice. Maybe it means he's having a hard time copying me.

If he calls me DR OM then I'll do the same.

If the CQ'er is being sparse and to the point, then I'm sparse and to the point.

Sometimes it's astonishing for me to hear two different style callers on nearby frequencies. The short and simple guys can turn around 5 actually useful conversational QSO's, while the longwinded guy is just barely getting around to giving a report and his name.

Tim.
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N6DZR
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« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2012, 04:34:04 PM »

It may not be on purpose. I have heard people do it on the phone and in person. I have even caught myself doing it at work when talking to a customer from the south... but then I was born in Atlanta, so maybe they just bring out my dormant accent.  Grin

-Jeff
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K3DCW
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« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2012, 06:06:28 PM »

Not "DXing", per se, but I hear it between Americans too.  It seems like anytime you put two Americans on the radio talking to each other, before long they both end up sounding like they were born and raised in southern Kentucky; sounding like two truckers from the 70's CB movie craze. 

What is it about a microphone that does this to people???

73

Dave
K3DCW
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ONAIR
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« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2012, 12:26:35 AM »

I once heard that some hams do it intentionally, because they believe it makes it easier for the foreign station to understand them!
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AF3Y
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« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2012, 06:18:38 AM »

  It seems like anytime you put two Americans on the radio talking to each other, before long they both end up sounding like they were born and raised in southern Kentucky; sounding like two truckers from the 70's CB movie craze. 

What is it about a microphone that does this to people???

73

Dave
K3DCW

My old english teacher would roll over in her grave Shocked


Perhaps mics should be banned Roll Eyes Cheesy
73 Gene AF3Y
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WS3N
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« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2012, 06:35:17 AM »

After "59, thank you," what's left to say?
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AA4PB
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« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2012, 06:49:52 AM »

After "59, thank you," what's left to say?

On PSK31 you can start up your 5-minute long "brag file"  Cheesy
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