Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: QSLing with metered postage?  (Read 1418 times)
W1VT
Member

Posts: 829




Ignore
« on: January 12, 2013, 03:49:41 PM »

I was just at the post office, after working number 63 for 80M DXCC, OX3IO.

I got a few International Airmail stamps from the Automated Postal Machine, which are metered postal stickers, as opposed to conventional stamps.

Maybe these stickers would be useful for QSLs to countries where theft is a concern?

Zack W1VT
Logged
W6GX
Member

Posts: 2645




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 03:54:04 PM »

Could you provide more details?  Are these metered stickers good for any country?  If yes then that would be a huge relief for those that use GS or buy specific country stamps.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
Logged
KB3LIX
Member

Posts: 1109




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 04:07:39 PM »

If they are sold by the USPS, they are only good within the service area
of the USPS.
No different than regular stamps.

You cannot use US Stamps to mail something from Canada, Venezuela
or any other foreign country.
That is why the IRC's had to be cashed in within the country
where the card would be originating.
Logged
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2670




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 04:09:52 PM »

I was just at the post office, after working number 63 for 80M DXCC, OX3IO.

I got a few International Airmail stamps from the Automated Postal Machine, which are metered postal stickers, as opposed to conventional stamps.

Maybe these stickers would be useful for QSLs to countries where theft is a concern?

Zack W1VT


Yes, but don't they just pay the freight to get the envelope overseas?  Once a thief sees USA as a return address isn't he/she still going to rifle through the envelope.  IOW, they are not IRCs so one must still include a few GS in the envelope.

73,

Chris/NU1O

Logged
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3764




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 07:09:21 PM »

I have always used PVI's (Postage Value Imprints) when sending overseas.

WHY??  Because Not only do some postal thieves across the pond pilfer envelopes for possible $$, some are also are "stamp collectors" and will rip the envelope for fancy/pretty stamps and throw the contents away.

PVIs are the little plain/ugly metered type postage strips they print out at the post office, if you will ask them to. They were a suggestion in one of the DX books I read some years ago. Works for me! Cool

73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
W2IRT
Member

Posts: 2663


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 07:43:40 PM »

I wouldn't worry about that unless you're using a combination of low-value stamps to make up the $1.05 (soon to be $1.10) international postage. I'd wager that the local postal thieves see thousands of U.S. international stamps going to the big name QSL managers and DX stations (as well as in normal business), so those would probably not be of any interest. I've only used the meter stamps when sending to Pakistan, Argentina (when things were much worse) and Kyrgyzstan.
Logged

www.facebook.com/W2IRT
Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2670




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 08:39:54 PM »

PVIs are the little plain/ugly metered type postage strips they print out at the post office, if you will ask them to. They were a suggestion in one of the DX books I read some years ago. Works for me! Cool

73, Gene AF3Y

When you are looking at your return rate you have no real way of knowing if old fashioned stamps would've got through or if your return rate is due to the metered postage unless you used both and tracked the results of each, or you saw a big jump in your response rate when you switched to the meter.

In looking at my records for last year the country which had the highest non-reply rate was the USA and it was not due to the majority of my QSL's going to the USA.  I don't have problems with QSL managers in the USA, they are typically great.  The problem is with individual US hams. Some just do not QSL.

I agree with W2IRT that if one is using only one stamp the foreign postal employees have seen thousands and would not be interested for stamp collecting purposes. I had a 100% return rate from Europe. One overseas ham said he did not get my card and the other foreign cards for which I had no reply were very poor countries in Asia. Those hams should really use managers but many do not.

My return rate is high - close to 90% and I'm not counting about 20 OQRS QSL's so I am not going to lose sleep over the few which were robbed at the post office or the other hams didn't feel like QSLing. All the recent ATNOs have QSLed and now that ZL9HR has verified with LoTW, I have all 317 current countries confirmed and about 6 deleted countries confirmed.

73,

Chris/NU1O

 
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 09:19:09 PM by NU1O » Logged
W6GX
Member

Posts: 2645




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2013, 11:22:31 PM »

I try to collect at least one card for every DXCC.  To get a card I choose a QSO that has already been confirmed on LoTW.  Well guess what, my return rate on those direct QSLs where I already have a LoTW confirmation is almost nil.  In hindsight that makes sense.  Those who use LoTW don't want to deal with paper QSL's.  Bummer.

The smart thing to do to save postage cost is for a DX to use two different QSL managers, one who resides in EU/Asia and another who resides in the US.  Common sense don't always prevail in ham radio Huh

73,
Jonathan W6GX
Logged
W2IRT
Member

Posts: 2663


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2013, 07:26:40 AM »

Jonathan, I'm surprised your QSL return rate is so low. I have to wonder what techniques you're using. I used to QSL everything that moved on the bands for the first 10 years and my rate of return was well over 90%. That included DXpeditions as well as ordinary home stations and everything in between.

I disagree about the need for managers in different countries. That just creates more work and more of a possibility of screw-ups along the way. If you're going to go the route of a manager (and I do wish that many rare ones would go that route) then pick a good one in a country with a good, solid and reliable post office that has relatively cheap rates and a near-zero chance of incoming mail being hijacked. U.S., Germany, Japan and probably a few other locations in western Europe.
Logged

www.facebook.com/W2IRT
Night gathers and now my watch begins. It shall not end until I reach Top of the Honor Roll.
W6GX
Member

Posts: 2645




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2013, 10:14:28 AM »

Jonathan, I'm surprised your QSL return rate is so low. I have to wonder what techniques you're using. I used to QSL everything that moved on the bands for the first 10 years and my rate of return was well over 90%. That included DXpeditions as well as ordinary home stations and everything in between.

I disagree about the need for managers in different countries. That just creates more work and more of a possibility of screw-ups along the way. If you're going to go the route of a manager (and I do wish that many rare ones would go that route) then pick a good one in a country with a good, solid and reliable post office that has relatively cheap rates and a near-zero chance of incoming mail being hijacked. U.S., Germany, Japan and probably a few other locations in western Europe.

Hi Pete,

Perhaps I should clarify my previous posting.  Occasionally I have a country confirmed on LoTW but I wanted a paper card for it.  This would be a non-contest station.  I drop a direct QSL with the proper foreign postage and my QSL rate for this type of contact is nil.  I have also sent follow up e-mails to the individuals with no replies.  The impression I have is that some hams don't want to deal with paper QSLs period.  And that's the reason why they upload to LoTW.  Your mileage may vary.

OTOH I have very good return rate on those who don't use LoTW.  For them the only method of QSL is direct and they mostly return my QSLs in a timely fashion.

RR on the QSL manager.  If I were a DX station there's absolutely no reason to not use a good QSL manager.  I enjoy QSLing but it does take a lot of my time.  I can't even imagine what's like for the DX.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
Logged
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2670




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2013, 10:34:35 AM »

I try to collect at least one card for every DXCC.  To get a card I choose a QSO that has already been confirmed on LoTW.  Well guess what, my return rate on those direct QSLs where I already have a LoTW confirmation is almost nil.  In hindsight that makes sense.  Those who use LoTW don't want to deal with paper QSL's.  Bummer.


73,
Jonathan W6GX

Are you reading the QRZ biographies for those you are QSLing with?  If not, you should. I often see remarks such as one QSL per band or if they have QSLed with LoTW they will not send a QSL.

Many hams have strict rules and if you don't follow them you are SOL.

73,

Chris/NU1O
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2220




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2013, 10:42:36 AM »

Perhaps I should clarify my previous posting.  Occasionally I have a country confirmed on LoTW but I wanted a paper card for it.  This would be a non-contest station.  I drop a direct QSL with the proper foreign postage and my QSL rate for this type of contact is nil.  I have also sent follow up e-mails to the individuals with no replies.  The impression I have is that some hams don't want to deal with paper QSLs period.  And that's the reason why they upload to LoTW.  Your mileage may vary.

Have you checked with your incoming card sorter? He knows which stations are religious about paper cards via the bureau (if not direct as well.) If you are looking for any particular variety of QSL pictures, believe me, the sorters have seen them all!

If I was picking out a station to solicit for a direct card... I would go to qrz.com and check out different hams that I had worked, looking for one with a clear paper QSL policy. You may even find one with a technologically-adept QSL manager you can hook up with via OQRS or E-mail. Some managers are extremely hip and can efficiently check for your call in all his managed DX stations logs (getting you multiple cards/countries at a time.)

Tim.
Logged
NU1O
Member

Posts: 2670




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2013, 11:35:20 AM »


RR on the QSL manager.  If I were a DX station there's absolutely no reason to not use a good QSL manager.  I enjoy QSLing but it does take a lot of my time.  I can't even imagine what's like for the DX.

73,
Jonathan W6GX

There is a very good reason not to use a QSL manger from the perspective of some DX stations. Some pocket some or all of the money.  $100, or more, a month is a small fortune in some countries.

73,

Chris/NU1O

Logged
N2RJ
Member

Posts: 1199




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2013, 03:16:47 PM »

I used to use an IBI service called endicia.com. They allow you to print barcoded postage on your computer. I figured if it looked more like business correspondence that it wouldn't be pilfered by dollar thieves. There are a few of them and stamps.com seems to be the mos popular but when I started only endicia.com would allow you to print postage for international use.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!