Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 3 Foot RG58A/U Jumper  (Read 1059 times)
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3677




Ignore
« on: December 31, 2012, 08:34:21 AM »

I have a couple 3 foot jumpers, (Belden 8219) made with RG58A/U coax. Nice and flexible and was wondering if I can use one of these between the amp and the connector that gets me thru the wall to the outside of the shack to the coax going to the antenna.

I do run legal limit from time to time there Roll Eyes. Will the RG58A/U jumper handle the load Huh

73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2012, 08:46:33 AM »

It will handle the legal limit.
Logged
KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1862




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2012, 08:46:47 AM »

See for yourself: http://www.timesmicrowave.com/cgi-bin/calculate.pl
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3812




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2012, 09:16:57 AM »

Remember that coax is spec'd on the assumption it's a textbook install... No pinches, no tight bends, no issues with the connectors and a properly matched load impedance both in and out. In the real world RG-58 offers very little margin at QRO with the worst case being on the upper bands.

Considering the cost and easy availability of an RG-213 jumper I don't see the advantage of a thin coax with small conductors.
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3677




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2012, 09:26:19 AM »


RG58A/U not listed......

73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5358




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2012, 09:30:36 AM »

Remember that coax is spec'd on the assumption it's a textbook install... No pinches, no tight bends, no issues with the connectors and a properly matched load impedance both in and out. In the real world RG-58 offers very little margin at QRO with the worst case being on the upper bands.

Considering the cost and easy availability of an RG-213 jumper I don't see the advantage of a thin coax with small conductors.

Well could use RG8x too. If you want a serious small jumper to pass through a wall use RG142, it will handle more power than 213.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4328




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2012, 09:53:25 AM »

You won't hit voltage breakdown if the connectors have been installed right AND there's no bad bends that can make the centre conductor migrate through the insulation, not matter what the SWR is. So the limitation is on current, and if you're running SSB or normal CW, you will get away with it. I've used RG58 at high powers but if run for long on a carrier, you can feel it get warm. So for non-contest SSB or CW on the HF bands, you would get away with it. For full power RTTY or SSTV, you probably would push it too far.

For a temporary fix until you can get an RG213, jumper, you're OK on SSB and CW.
Logged
AF3Y
Member

Posts: 3677




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2012, 12:10:25 PM »

Thanks for all the replies.
I have a rg213 jumper there now, just ran up  on the RG58A/U jumpers in my box of "stuff", and thought it would be a bit neater, etc.

73, Gene AF3Y
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!