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Author Topic: Duplexers and triplexers  (Read 1661 times)
KB3OZC
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Posts: 2




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« on: December 25, 2012, 07:24:07 PM »

About 4 years ago I dug a trench and buried 2-100ft coax lines to a shed in my back yard.  Recently I upgraded to General (last week) and want to expand my antenna selection without running more lines. Does anyone have experience with these?  It seems like a nice alternative. I couldn't find any review on here and it seems like a new product mfj is selling.

http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4926C

Thank you for your help,

Joel
KB3OZC
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Joel
KB3OZC
WN2C
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Posts: 451




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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2012, 03:01:33 AM »

What rig you running and what type of antenna(s) do you have or plan on installing?
Need more info...

Rick  wn2c
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KB3OZC
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 06:21:45 AM »

Currently I have a ic-7000. My antennas are as follows:

1.  10m vertical ground plane
2. Hustler g6 2m/70cm dual band
3. Cushcraft 11 element 2m yagi.

I am looking to add a g5rv or some other type of wire antenna for HF

I also have an 11 element 70cm I wanted to use


Thanks for the help

Joel
KB3OZC
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Joel
KB3OZC
AC2EU
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 06:55:47 AM »

Before you get a G5RV read this first:

http://www.karinya.net/g3txq/g5rv/

I would prefer an antenna switch over the "triplexer" ,though.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2012, 07:59:28 AM »

Before you get a G5RV read this first:

http://www.karinya.net/g3txq/g5rv/

I would prefer an antenna switch over the "triplexer" ,though.


Yes. They have remote switches that at at the antennas.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2379




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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 08:51:04 AM »

Unless you have nice hardline, you really don't want to run VHF/UHF 100 feet.  The losses get large.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2012, 08:59:26 PM »

Well, the problem you'll have is the 10M antenna and the G5RV would be in the same frequency range of the HF port of the splitter.  If you're connecting multiple HF antennas your only convenient option is a remote antenna switch.  You could still use a di/triplexer to mux other bands onto that same line however. 

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 978




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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2012, 10:17:25 PM »

Ameritron makes several remote coax switches. If you want to run VHF/UHF,then the RCS-8V (5 port) and RCS-10V (8 port) are the way to go, and you'll need to run a separate control cable. they make a 4-port model that doesn't require a separate cable, but it's not rated for VHF/UHF.  I used Cat3 Indoor/Outdoor rated cable on my RCS-8V.  Once you have the switch, you'll think of more antennas to add!
Also, Diplexers are generally not built for serious outdoor use. I had one. It worked for a while. That's why I went to the switch!
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W6EM
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Posts: 800




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« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2012, 06:10:02 PM »

About 4 years ago I dug a trench and buried 2-100ft coax lines to a shed in my back yard.  Recently I upgraded to General (last week) and want to expand my antenna selection without running more lines. ....

Joel:

If you directly-buried coax and didn't put it in conduit that you could seal-up, you probably need new coax by now.  You could put in something like a 2" PVC conduit run, then pull in some good line like some used 1/2 inch hardline and a run of CAT5 network cable as a control cable for a remote switch.  MFJ's box is a good one.  You could also make one out of some 12V latching relays and a remote control box to close and trip the latching relays.

Lee
W6EM
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4619




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« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2013, 06:38:36 AM »

I directly buried some UR67 (British equivalent to RG213). About a year later, I changed things around, and needed to shorten the cable. Cut it, and water came out!  The jacket had leaked enough that water had wicked along the braid and even ten feet up in the air where the cable went up the tower.

Maybe a trench with a suitable conduit, sloped down at one end and a drain to suitable soak away (drain field in US, I  believe) would be OK, but unless you have cable rated for direct burial, I have come to the conclusion it's a no-no.
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W6EM
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Posts: 800




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« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2013, 09:29:59 AM »

Many years ago, I used to design coaxial high voltage polyethylene insulated underground cables.  When cut open after being in subsurface boxes that filled with water over a period of years, it wasn't unusual to actually have water pour out of the stranded center conductor.  And, the polyethylene insulation layer was about 6-7mm thick.  Much thicker than RG-8.  And, it wasn't foam, which would tend to make matters worse.  And, the cables were operating at 12KV to ground.  Of course, at 60Hz here or 50Hz across the pond, no big deal.  The shield was usually a layer of spiral wires on the outside.

PVC duct, if the ends are sealed from water and brought up above ground, should be a much better barrier.  As any moisture that should migrate through the heavy PVC conduit wall would tend to evaporate.  And, if hardline is used, you've got a solid metal barrier that keeps it from coming in past the jacket.  You could even hook up a leaf blower once a year and give it a good blow.....with the ends uncapped, to clean out any water or varmints.
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