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Author Topic: substitute for 1N34a germanium diode  (Read 19308 times)
KE5HCC
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Posts: 7




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« on: December 31, 2012, 11:09:11 AM »

Going to try to build an On Air RF driven indicator from an 8/2004 QST article.
One of the parts listed is the above diode. My own research as to a possible replacement made my head spin.

Any ideas?

Thank you.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13287




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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2012, 11:23:34 AM »

1N34s are still around (Dan's Small Parts and Kits carries them), and many
other types of germanium diodes will be suitable replacements.  I'd typically
use a 1N60 or 1N270, just because that's what I have in the junkbox.

Remember that in early years the 1N34 was the most common diode available,
and it was used in a lot of circuits where a silicon diode such as the 1N4148
or a hot carrier diode would be a better choice today.
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W9GB
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Posts: 2623




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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2012, 11:49:54 AM »

NTE carries the 1N34A germanium diode, which are available from US retailers, store fronts.
http://www.nteinc.com/specs/original/1N34A.pdf

Radio Shack did carry NTE109, at one time.
http://www.experimentalistsanonymous.com/diy/Datasheets/1N46%20NTE109.pdf

NTE583 is the 1N5711 schottky diode, made for RF detectors, mixers.

Xtal Set Society / Midnight Science carry 1N34A
http://www.midnightscience.com/catalog5.html#part8
« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 12:02:36 PM by W9GB » Logged
KK4MRN
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Posts: 92




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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2012, 12:07:41 PM »

Additional places in the USA or Web:

Radio Shack has Germanium Diodes.  I have not tried them though.

Do a search on their web site for: Ge Diode

NTE109 - D-GE General Purpose Diode
http://www.radioshack.com/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=ge%20diode&origkw=ge+diode&sr=1

You should be able to find them doing a search for germanium diode or 1N34A on Amazon.com or ebay.com

On Amazon.com, do a search for: Elenco Diode 80 Piece Kit
You will get an assortment of diodes which include Germanium Diodes.

Amateur Radio Supply
http://www.amateurradiosupplies.com/?gclid=CKrKio-4xbQCFcqY4AodJyUARg

Scott's Electronics
http://www.angelfire.com/electronic2/index1/

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KK4MRN
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Posts: 92




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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2012, 12:13:13 PM »

I was wrong about Amatur Radio Supply.  I meant this instead:

Antique Radio Supply
http://www.tubesandmore.com/

I have bought the 1N34A germanium diodes from Scott's Electronics.  They worked in my crystal AM radio.  It worked much better once I hooked it up to a LM386 amplifier to power a 8 ohm impendence speaker so I would not have to use a crystal earphone.
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KE5HCC
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2013, 05:45:06 AM »

Lots of good answers, thanks ya'll.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3860




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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2013, 08:17:08 AM »

9GB:  Many thanks for that 'available here' info.  I needed two 1N34 diodes for a couple regenerative receivers but was choking on the necessity of buying 10 from Dan's plus paying postage which also sticks in my throat!

I researched the "Shack" but apparently didn't enter the correct information.

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N3QE
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Posts: 2223




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« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2013, 08:14:44 PM »

Going to try to build an On Air RF driven indicator from an 8/2004 QST article.
One of the parts listed is the above diode. My own research as to a possible replacement made my head spin.

One of the reason your head may have spun, is that just about any diode will serve as a detector. ANY diode. If this were for use in a milliwatt output QRP rig then you might notice a difference between germanium vs silicon vs Schottky diodes but above a few watts it will make no difference.

Just looked at the circuit in Aug 2004 QST, the 1N914 or 1N4148 will do just fine.

Tim.
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AC2EU
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« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2013, 09:35:46 PM »

A shottkey diode might even be better than the the 1n34, having an even lower knee voltage.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2013, 07:14:07 AM »

And, for purposes of detection, the 1N60 germanium will also likely work okay. 
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K7ELP
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2013, 12:19:22 PM »

I had the same problem...looking for 1N34.  A fellow ham recommended 1N5711.  It is a schotky diode.  I used one in a homebrew field strength meter. I worked fine and was rectifiying right near 0.2V vf.
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12856




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« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2013, 12:34:12 PM »

Even Amazon has 1N34a diodes.
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9A5BDP
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Posts: 110




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« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2013, 06:03:01 AM »

Personally, I prefere OA and AA series of european types but recently it is possible to acquire very good germanium diodes from ex USSR production sites thru ebay an with military specs also.
Even germanium transistor may work like ordinary diode...
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2013, 01:45:55 PM »

Didn't the OP say that the diode was found back up there somewhere? 

I guess the next post will describe using a graphite pencil point and a rusty razor blade...



73
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K0BT
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Posts: 186




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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2013, 10:06:01 AM »

KE5HCC,  I bought a few extra 1N34A diodes the last time I needed them.  I'd be happy to mail you a couple.  PM me if you still need them.

Bob, K0BT
« Last Edit: January 09, 2013, 10:08:52 AM by K0BT » Logged
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