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Author Topic: 80M JA splits  (Read 1136 times)
N3QE
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Posts: 2024




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« on: January 03, 2013, 09:31:45 AM »

This early AM (East Coast time) many JA's were clearly audible on 80M CW. I noticed that many of the east coast callers for them, were calling down a few hundred Hz. Is this a kind of "standard practice" on 80M, for JA's to listen down just a little bit?

Oh, BTW, while I struggled several minutes to work the JA's, I got H40FN on my second call 80M CW. Just had to brag :-). An ATNO for me. 80M has been good enough round the world that I've gotten several ATNO's on 80M past couple weeks (Bahrain week before last.)
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N2NL
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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2013, 11:52:20 PM »

Here on Guam I literally work dozens of JAs just about every night on 80m.  Most call zero beat.  Not sure why you were hearing them call with an offset - it's unusual unless they are split or unless they have a pileup and are pulling calls from the side of the pile.

73, Dave KH2/N2NL
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N3QE
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2013, 05:58:27 AM »

Here on Guam I literally work dozens of JAs just about every night on 80m.  Most call zero beat.  Not sure why you were hearing them call with an offset - it's unusual unless they are split or unless they have a pileup and are pulling calls from the side of the pile.

73, Dave KH2/N2NL

Here on the East Coast of the US, calling low-band DX (here I'm kind of excluding much of Europe from "DX") zero beat is usually a poor choice. They seem to listen up or down a few hundred Hz, and I can understand why, because it's rude to everyone to be sending on the DX's frequency. Just wondering out loud here, if "up" vs "down" is a universal convention or just depends on QRM and individual preference.

Certainly I've noticed as I learn the ropes of 80M and 160M DX'ing, the DX "listening up" is far from universal. Listening down seems at least as common, and I remember several 160M DXpeditions which announced that they were listening down, and a handful on 80M.

Dave, when you work the US/NA on 80M, do you announce a split, or just listen up and down a few hundred Hz, or something else?
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NI0C
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2013, 08:09:05 AM »

One of the sneaky little secrets of CW Dx'ing is calling a little up or down from the transceive frequency during a "simplex" pileup.  Knowing when and how to do this will serve you well.
73,
Chuck NI0C
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W1VT
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Posts: 800




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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2013, 08:20:53 AM »

One of the sneaky little secrets of CW Dx'ing is calling a little up or down from the transceive frequency during a "simplex" pileup.  Knowing when and how to do this will serve you well.
73, Chuck NI0C


Works well in tandem with the QRP technique of calling *EVERYONE* with a decent signal at a very high hourly rate to find out who can hear and who can't. Done properly, you find tons of stuff before anyone relying on cluster spots gets to them.  If you are really QRP, you  don't expect anyone to actually come back, but are delighted when someone does.   Cheesy

Zack W1VT
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N3QE
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2013, 09:21:49 AM »

One of the sneaky little secrets of CW Dx'ing is calling a little up or down from the transceive frequency during a "simplex" pileup.  Knowing when and how to do this will serve you well.

I got 5BDXCC with 100W and a wire, so obviously I know a little bit about calling away from the pack. Still there are some conventions for low band DX'ing that I'm trying to learn. I saw a long post about JA's on 160M and the historical splits there (listening low due to different band allocations in different regions), and am wondering out loud if there are any "well known conventions" as to listening up vs down on 80 and 160. On the high bands the DX in simplex tends to listen just a little up (although when that starts getting thick going down often pays off!) but 80 and 160 seem to follow some different patterns. Certainly from the East Coast, I'm surprised that the low band DX doesn't announce a split sooner or more often, it's hell trying to hear the DX at the noise level when the powerhouse stations are pinning the S-meter at my QTH.

Tim.
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NI0C
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Posts: 2380




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« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2013, 11:50:59 AM »

Tim,
I'm not aware of any generally applicable split frequency customs that are unique to the lowbands.  You are probably aware that JA's operate below 1825 KHz on 160m.  Some stations (notably FK8CP) will CQ above 1825 and announce a QSX below, so as not to exclude JA's.

Probably the DX stations that we wish were operating split simply aren't hearing many of the callers.

Congrats on your 5B DXCC with low power and wire antennas.  You are doing a fantastic job and are a good CW operator.
73,
Chuck NI0C
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N2NL
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Posts: 323




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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2013, 01:13:58 PM »

Here on Guam I literally work dozens of JAs just about every night on 80m.  Most call zero beat.  Not sure why you were hearing them call with an offset - it's unusual unless they are split or unless they have a pileup and are pulling calls from the side of the pile.

73, Dave KH2/N2NL

Here on the East Coast of the US, calling low-band DX (here I'm kind of excluding much of Europe from "DX") zero beat is usually a poor choice. They seem to listen up or down a few hundred Hz, and I can understand why, because it's rude to everyone to be sending on the DX's frequency. Just wondering out loud here, if "up" vs "down" is a universal convention or just depends on QRM and individual preference.

Certainly I've noticed as I learn the ropes of 80M and 160M DX'ing, the DX "listening up" is far from universal. Listening down seems at least as common, and I remember several 160M DXpeditions which announced that they were listening down, and a handful on 80M.

Dave, when you work the US/NA on 80M, do you announce a split, or just listen up and down a few hundred Hz, or something else?

If I am split, I will always announce it.  For EU, I am split all the time just by the nature of the pileup.  For NA, it depends on conditions and how many callers I have.

Wherever I am listening - if up 1 or simplex - I am always listening around, +/- a few Hz (not hundreds).  I will often work a weaker caller in the clear off the side of the pile than a loud caller exactly up 1 or whatever.  I like to think I am rewarding the savvy operator instead of the packet spot clicker.

I think most good ops use this technique... I was fortunate to have some very good mentors.  The problem, especially during contest, is when everyone calls zero beat exactly, if simplex or split.  Makes it really hard to pull calls out. 

What I meant by my original response is that when calling someone, JAs usually will call zero beat if there are only 1 or 2 callers.  Any more and I'm working the RIT/XIT depending on if I'm the one on the receiving end or if I'm the one calling.

73, Dave
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AF3Y
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Posts: 3674




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« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2013, 02:43:48 PM »

One of the sneaky little secrets of CW Dx'ing is calling a little up or down from the transceive frequency during a "simplex" pileup.  Knowing when and how to do this will serve you well.
73,
Chuck NI0C


Wish you would quit giving away our secrets! hi hi
73, Gene AF3Y
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