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Author Topic: Should I restore a Heathkit SB-102?  (Read 10803 times)
AC2EU
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« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2013, 06:10:20 AM »

KJ6ZOL, I'm curious how do you come to the conclusion that the 102 is an obsolete rig when there is really no such thing.

"ZOL" explained his reluctance in the post above. 
1) He is too young to have any nostalgic feelings about Heathkit.
2) He is unable to  perform the repairs.
3) He prefers to buy a kit.
I think he means "obsolete" in the sense that technology has moved on since the 102 and there are no questions on the Extra exam about tubes any more.

Hey! To each his own. That's why there are so many bands and modes in Ham radio =right?
I like to restore the "oldies" too, but I draw the line at Heathkit. Those old cheap phenolic boards with tubes on them give me pause... ( I am now retreating to a foxhole to avoid the flames  Grin)

Personally, if I am going to spend the time with a boat anchor, it's going to be military or one of the classic manufacturers.
...but that's MY opinion, yours may differ and I respect that!!

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W5RKL
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« Reply #31 on: January 09, 2013, 06:12:17 AM »

Also, if my current dummy load won't support having 180w fed into it for long periods of time, and it's a dry dummy so it likely won't, I'd have to complete my wet dummy load project. I have everything except the resistors ($50) and the mineral oil ($20). So, an additional $70.

Where did you get the idea that the SB-102 has an output power of 180 watts? The SB-102 does not produce 180 watts output. The 180 watts you are referring to is "180 watts PEP INPUT" not "Output". The SB-102 final amplifier cannot and will not produce 180 watts output.

Quote
$70 digital frequency counter (I really don't feel comfortable with the way the analog tuning on the 102 is set up)

If you are thinking that a Frequency Counter, by itself, will provide you with a "Digital Display" of the SB-102's operating frequency then you are mistaken. Adding a "Digital Display" to the SB-102 is much more than a "Frequency Counter". The dial accuracy is quite good in the SB-102, providing it hasn't been messed with. The VFO in the SB-102 is all solid state.

Quote
The way the HP-23A power supply is wired, it would be easier to simply buy a power supply kit from oldheathkitparts.com and use that in place of the original electrolytics and resistors. So another $70. You see how this adds up quickly?....The problem is with the way it's wired, you can't just snip out the cans and solder in new ones.

You can rebuild the HP-23A power supply with individual parts for less.

You can restuff the 4 tall black capacitors with inexpensive snap in capacitors.
Mouser cap replacements:

150ufd 450VDC (snap in, replaces the 125ufd 450VDC cap)
P/N 667-EET-ED2W151CA
Price: $5.20 each (4 required).

Caps below the chassis, also from Mouser:
 
20ufd at 150VDC (Axial lead)
P/N 75-500D226M150DF2
Price $3.77 each (2 required)

40ufd 450VDC (Axial lead)
P/N 647-TVX2W470MDD
Price $6.58 each (1 required)

Diodes, also from Mouser:

P/N 512-1N4007
Price: 14 cents each (7 required)

total for parts is $35.90 plus shipping to replace all the HP-23A power supply components except for the power transformer and choke. That's "half" the $70 price you said you would have to spend for a "kit" of parts.

If you don't know how to restuff a can capacitor, the following link will show you how to do it.

http://www.ppinyot.com/C/capacitor_stuffing.htm

Replacement belts all 3 of them are being sold on eBay under auction #321047628064 for $5.64 and that includes shipping.

If you ask around I'm sure you can get the 11 pin male and female plugs/sockets and hoods along with sufficient multiple wire cable for a lot less than what eBay sellers are asking for the plugs, hoods, and wire "kit" ($29.99).

I don't know what cabling/equipment you are referring to when you say "cabling and equipment to hook it to my current system" other than coax cable and PL-259 connectors.

The manual, if purchased from one of the various manual websites, will cost about $36 which is normal and you will need it not only to setup and operate the SB-102 properly but also to service the SB-102. i would not recommend you attempt any servicing of the SB-102 until you have the complete assembly manual.

I understand fixed income under SS but I'm sure there are hams who can help you with obtaining the parts.


73s
Mike
W5RKL




« Last Edit: January 09, 2013, 06:18:19 AM by W5RKL » Logged
K8AXW
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« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2013, 09:40:04 AM »

Mike: Great answer!  Not only chapter and verse but also where and how! 
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AC2EU
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« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2013, 10:56:26 AM »

Mike: Great answer!  Not only chapter and verse but also where and how! 

It doesn't get any better than that, but the only problem is ...the OP already said that he  isn't going to do it!  Grin  Shocked  Huh  Roll Eyes
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N2EY
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« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2013, 01:03:44 PM »

Here is my breakdown of costs:

$25 power cable and belts
$30 reprint of manual
$60-70 cabling and equipment to hook it into my current setup
$70 digital frequency counter (I really don't feel comfortable with the way the analog tuning on the 102 is set up)

I see the problem - you're using list prices for all-new parts.

What happened to the old power cable?

What is required to hook it into your current setup? All an SB-102 needs is an 4 to 8 ohm speaker, key, high impedance mike, power supply and cable, ground wire and coax to the antenna.

You don't need ta digital readout. Besides, a simple counter won't work anyway. The SB-102 dial is good to 1 kHz when calibrated,  and that's plenty.

Also, if my current dummy load won't support having 180w fed into it for long periods of time, and it's a dry dummy so it likely won't, I'd have to complete my wet dummy load project. I have everything except the resistors ($50) and the mineral oil ($20). So, an additional $70.

Also, any resistors that have to be unsoldered and replaced. Also, although it comes with the original power supply, many of the parts may be bad. The way the HP-23A power supply is wired, it would be easier to simply buy a power supply kit from oldheathkitparts.com and use that in place of the original electrolytics and resistors. So another $70. You see how this adds up quickly?

The rig only puts out about 100 watts. Before 1983, ham rigs went by input power.

Like I said, I'm hoping he'll take it back. If he won't, we'll have to bring it up on a variac and see what happens. He admitted that the big can electrolytics in the power supply would likely need to be replaced. The problem is with the way it's wired, you can't just snip out the cans and solder in new ones.

I suggest that you sell it if he won't take it back. There are plenty of hams who'd love to restore it, and have the know-how.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KH2G
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« Reply #35 on: January 17, 2013, 11:55:44 AM »

If you take one step at a time and learn from it so you really understand ie power supply circuit, oscillator etc it will be time and money well spent and you'll have a nice radio at the end.
Enjoy
Dick KH2G
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WN2C
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« Reply #36 on: January 18, 2013, 07:37:01 AM »

Maybe you should ask your Elmer why he gave you that radio.  I'll bet a Dollar to a donut that he gave it to you so that you could learn a bit about how a radio works.  That is what Ham Radio is all about...learning.  You learned alot by reading the study guide didn't you?  Well here is your next step in the learning process grasshopper!

p.s.
I wish my Elmer gave me a SB-102 and PS! It would be one radio that I would not sell.

Rick  wn2c
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2013, 02:58:52 AM »

I just thought I should let everybody know, my Elmer has given me permission to sell this radio. Mainly because he lost his house, and will have to move out of state, and thus will not be around to teach me. He also didn't realize some of my budget constraints, until I explained it to him. I told him that it would be at least a year before I could afford to fix it, and he explained to me about his bankruptcy and losing his house and that he would have to leave California to find a house near an airport (he is a licensed pilot). The bank gave him 45 days to move, so he explained that sadly I would be on my own. We said goodbye and I asked him what I should do with the Heathkit, and he said just sell it. So I will. Look for it on Ebay, because I can get the most money for it there.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2013, 08:49:10 AM »

ZOL:  When I asked an old hunting "Elmer" about sellling a rifle I had he asked me, "Does it eat anything?"  When I replied "No" he then asked, "If you don't have to feed it then why in the hell do you want to sell it?"

So let me ask you, why in the hell are you so bent on selling it?  Yea, I know. It's none of my &^%*#@ business.  I wish you well.
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AC2EU
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« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2013, 09:13:20 AM »

ZOL:  When I asked an old hunting "Elmer" about sellling a rifle I had he asked me, "Does it eat anything?"  When I replied "No" he then asked, "If you don't have to feed it then why in the hell do you want to sell it?"

So let me ask you, why in the hell are you so bent on selling it?  Yea, I know. It's none of my &^%*#@ business.  I wish you well.

probably because he doesn't want it !  Grin
I have a Teac reel to reel which doesn't eat much either, but it's sitting in the corner collecting dust, so I am selling it to  someone can appreciate  and enjoy it better than I can. See how that works?  Cheesy
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2013, 09:14:21 AM »

ZOL:  When I asked an old hunting "Elmer" about sellling a rifle I had he asked me, "Does it eat anything?"  When I replied "No" he then asked, "If you don't have to feed it then why in the hell do you want to sell it?"

So let me ask you, why in the hell are you so bent on selling it?  Yea, I know. It's none of my &^%*#@ business.  I wish you well.

No room at the inn, to make a long story short. I just got rid of a bunch of clutter, I don't need more.
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N2EY
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« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2013, 11:29:30 AM »

I just thought I should let everybody know, my Elmer has given me permission to sell this radio. Mainly because he lost his house, and will have to move out of state, and thus will not be around to teach me. He also didn't realize some of my budget constraints, until I explained it to him. I told him that it would be at least a year before I could afford to fix it, and he explained to me about his bankruptcy and losing his house and that he would have to leave California to find a house near an airport (he is a licensed pilot). The bank gave him 45 days to move, so he explained that sadly I would be on my own. We said goodbye and I asked him what I should do with the Heathkit, and he said just sell it. So I will. Look for it on Ebay, because I can get the most money for it there.

Given all that, I think selling it is the best bet. Somebody else will enjoy fixing it up.

73 es GL de Jim, N2EY
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K8AXW
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« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2013, 10:04:52 PM »

Yea, I know.... you guys are right...... guess I've seen this happen so many times with it coming back to bite me. 
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KE7KPB
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« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2013, 05:50:16 AM »

I have been rebuilding a SB101 and having a ball doing it. So far what I have learned is replace all of the resistors, I pulled the boards one by one and cleaned off all of the parts, checked the disk caps and replaced any that were out of spec, replaced all resistors and check all inductors. 2 more boards to go and it is done. This is almost like building one from scratch. The one thing I do like about the old radios is the radios can be repaired and the new ones have to be shipped back to the factory unless your setup to work on smt. Don't count out the Heathkit radios, Look at eBay, the prices for the old tube gear is going up a lot.
Sure I know the new stuff has all of the fancy new filters and push button plug and play but the joy of actually being a radio operator and learning how to tune up one and dipping the plate is always half the fun.
 Grin
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K4SC
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« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2013, 06:45:23 PM »

The one very important thing no one has mentioned is the lethal high voltages found inside the radio.  At least 600 up to 800 VDC can ruin your day and put a smile on the undertaker.  If you are new to electronics, I would definitely recommend you have an experienced person assist you.  I would further qualify your assistant asking if he/she has worked with voltages higher than 12 VDC or 120 VAC.  This is not an issue with the TS-130 where the worst thing you could probably do is short out 12 VDC and smoke a circuit board. 
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