Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Zero-Five vs. DX-Engineering 43 ft - Build Quality  (Read 5714 times)
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5348




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2013, 01:04:46 PM »

Personally I'd be a whole lot more concerned about the antenna (either one) giving away due to the wind & collapsing than I would about the mount! I would think the chance of either mount failing you would be virtually nonexistent. As far as which one is better seems more like a matter of personal opinion, I debated both of them & bought the one I found the best deal on. To the best of my knowledge their both pretty much equal & built to similar specs from what I can tell. The only complaint I have about any of the 43 ft verticals is they require the additional expense of a remote tuner to get the best signal strength out of them & avoid any losses in the coax.

The reason I commented about mount is not whether is may fail in a storm but rather it is nice to have a mount that DOES NOT require removal/installations of bolts to tilt over. Generally when raising or lowering your hands are full and nice not to be trying to remove or install bolts at same time.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
KF5RGB
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2013, 06:12:49 PM »

What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?  Shocked Shocked Shocked
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5348




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2013, 08:37:38 AM »

What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?  Shocked Shocked Shocked

Its called good weather proof grease/lube. Being that hardware is SS though it is unlikely. More likely to see that with a aluminum mount due to dissimilar metals.
Logged

--------------------------------------
Entered using a  WiFi Win 8.1 RT tablet or a Android tablet using 4G/LTE or WiFi.
K0BT
Member

Posts: 176




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2013, 10:52:50 AM »

"What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?"

The secret is to keep pulling upward on the antenna as you tilt it down.  I had to replace the 1/4-20 stainless bolts because I bent them before I learned the trick. 
Logged
WB8LCD
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2013, 11:06:55 AM »

Tim,
DXE has some pretty good information available on their website including a Tech FAQ about their two types of tilt bases:

http://www.dxengineering.com/techsupport/faqs/tilt-bases-mbve-1-vs-mbve-5
 

They also have a couple of videos showning the two types of tilt bases in action:

TB-3P with an MBVA-1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZiqhXVxD04&feature=plcp
 
MBVE-5 Saf-T-Tllt Base: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OqV6Ixx2g0&feature=context-cha

I'd check them out!

73,
Tom wb8lcd

Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2013, 09:10:03 PM »

What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?  Shocked Shocked Shocked

Don't know ... has never happened here.

I use the hand tighten tool-less knobs that DX Eng sells for their tiltover plate to tighten/loosen for tilting over a 6BTV and has never ever failed me in over 2 years. Won't say it can't happen but highly doubtful given the top quality of the components and design. Just my 2 cents from here in the windy Mojave Desert.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
K2CMH
Member

Posts: 275




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2013, 11:11:35 AM »

I have one of the DX Engineering 43' verticals mounted about 20 feet from my shack.  It is fed with direct burial RG213 coax.  I have often wondered how much (if any) I would benefit from having a remote tuner given the short distances involved.  Does anyone have any opinion on that?

Carlton
Logged
KB6HRT
Member

Posts: 93




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2013, 02:47:37 PM »

The Zero 5 43'er, I drop it down no problem just pull the top bolt, the bottom bolt will keep the antenna standing till I walk the antenna down. If you can use a screwdrive antenna in series with your 43'er that works real well, the only thing I did was put a couple of chokes on the control cable, and chokes of the coax, that did the trick for my setup, no RF in the shack and no noise in the audio when tuning screwdriver....................KB6HRT
Logged
W5WSS
Member

Posts: 1597




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2013, 02:09:36 AM »

Carlton, It depends on the amount of mismatch on the antenna feedline, located after your built in rig tuner, this section of the system is not matched and additional line loss due to high mismatch above and beyond the line attenuation specifications under a matched state per 100ft usually.

The short answer is yes the entire system that is on the mismatched side of your internal rig tuner  (consisting of sufficient ground radials very near the atop of ground shallow at deepest means on the ground or just under the grass turf not the soil)would benefit from a remote auto tuner at the antenna base, and a 1:1 ratio choke balun both located here.

Your 43 ft vertical can deliver almost all power applied to it when the line is operated in a matched state.

This can be accomplished when the tuner is placed between the antenna base and your 213 coaxial cable leading to the equipment in your shack.

To protect the remote tuner and Choke balun at the antenna base togetherfrom exposure to damage they can be installed in a weather proof box.

When the mismatch is corrected your system will work to it's maximum potential.

73
Logged
W5WSS
Member

Posts: 1597




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2013, 02:14:42 AM »

Carlton yes even though the line length is only 20ft
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2520




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2013, 06:45:09 AM »

Quote
"What do you do when using the DX Engineering plate when the bolt (that's never been removed) hangs up in the groove on the plate while your in the middle of walking the antenna up or down?"

Happened to me quite a few times with my DXE plate in the 3+ years I've had the antenna.  Replaced the bolts several times. Much easier to happen with their 43' verticals than with small verticals, like a Hustler. You do get better with practice. Best to use two people and wait for a calm day.
Logged
K2CMH
Member

Posts: 275




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2013, 07:41:56 AM »

Hi Robert (W5WSS),

Thanks for the reply.  Not that it probably makes a difference, but the antenna is being fed into an MFJ-998 tuner in the shack, which is connected to an ALS-600, then of course it is connected to the rig.

I know there are many variables involved so you can't really give any kind of definitive answer, but based on my current configuration versus going with a remote tuner at the base of the antenna (and doing away with the one in the shack), how much more improvement in efficiency would you expect to see?  Would it be enough to offset the cost of a remote tuner.  Since I am using more than the typical 100-200 watts, I would need a higher power rated tuner which drives up the cost significantly.

Thanks,
Carlton
Logged
WB4ROA
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2013, 03:04:07 AM »

I cannot comment on DX Engineering, but I have had a Zerofive up here on the east coast of NC for four years and it has managed to survive the weather very nicely.  Several hurricanes with winds in excess of 90MPH.  It you watch it it wills care you to death as it reaches about 45 degrees, but it pops right back and remains straight to date.  Components are top notch!  Well satisfied.

Hank - WB4ROA
Logged
WD4ELG
Member

Posts: 860




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2013, 07:14:32 AM »

K2CMH, do you have an SWR meter that indicates the mismatch?  Without that, there's really no way to know how much loss there is (just to be in the know).  Remote tuners for high power are WAY more expensive.  How long is the coax run?  It might be cheaper to just replace the coax with some DX Engineering 400 Max which is lower loss than 213, and just accept the higher SWR and thereby eliminate any worries about SWR losses.  But again, no way to know for sure without the SWR meter.

I have my ZF 43 footer in central NC.  5 years.  LOT of winds.  Never an issue.  Both models should be of good quality, both companies have excellent reputations.
Logged
KE0Q
Member

Posts: 19




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2013, 07:21:46 AM »

I've appreciated all the input concerning the Zero-Five vs. DX-Engineering 43 ft.  I talked to Tom at Zero-Five day before yesterday and ordered a 43 footer.  Tom is a great guy to talk to, is very helpful and knowledgeable, and provided me with some good suggestions.   I'm looking forward to getting the antenna on the air.
73, Tim - KE0Q
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!