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Author Topic: Local CW Net  (Read 525 times)
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




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« on: April 21, 2009, 02:34:02 PM »

If one were to start up an informal CW net for local, or not so local, OM and YL to code practice and whatever else one does on a net, how would one begin?

How is a CW net meeting done? Is there a list of "members" and a chairperson calls on each member, or do the members know their order or sequence of participation, or do they just pile up and see what happens?

Obviously a freq or freqs would need to be chosen to meet at a specified time, known by all in advance by some routine or notification. If we were psychic, we wouldn't need the radios, now would we...hihi.

A few local OM are interested in code practice, and heck, we can even do CW on 2 meters because of our proximity.

TIA
73


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KC9HOZ
Member

Posts: 103




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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2009, 06:15:36 AM »

2m code practice nets were not so uncommon before code testing was dropped.  Ask around at your local club (or clubs, if you have more than one) and you will probably find someone who was involved in one at one time.

Scott
kc9hoz
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W5ESE
Member

Posts: 550


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2009, 06:56:46 AM »

CW traffic nets have a very rigid format.

See this web page for the skinny on it;

http://www.qsl.net/n5lf/cw-nts.html

For something less formal, I'd just suggest a
"watering hole" (a frequency), and a day and time.
Then just tune there at the given time, and you
(or someone else) can call 'CQ'. Someone else
answers, others break in as they arrive, and
you're on your way.

BTW, a slow speed traffic net exists in Texas.

Texas Slow Net
nightly
7:45 pm Central
3552 KHz

net control is either WB5NKC or KB5TCH

 73
Scott
W5ESE
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K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2009, 10:20:40 AM »

Thanks, Scott, and uh, Scott.
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KG4TKC
Member

Posts: 72




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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2009, 11:48:05 AM »

K5END:

     I think you are on to something OM. A gathering place to practice,learn,and get up to speed on the QN signals and the protocol of the traffic nets would be fun. They are pretty daunting it you are like me and and still working on the basics. I would say you could structure it however you wished. Just have a time and frequency,call the net,and just let it grow on its own. Keep it low-key and relaxed,work in the QN signals along,make it a fun way to practice,learn,and meet some like-minded cw folks. One thing I like about some small nets is that they can develop into a ragchew session after the net is closed.

     Ten meters might be a good frequency for both local folks and the chance for some not so local cw ops. With the E-Skip season coming up band openings might make it even more fun.

     Keep working with it,I think you are onto something. 73 es GL-KG4TKC
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 12:44:06 PM »

When I was first licensed I had a CB vert antenna as did a few of my friends who were also licensed around the same time.

We'd get on 10 meters in the evenings to just chat to improve our sending and copying speeds.

Course, we all had to get to 5WPM to get our tickets.

Best from Tucson
Bob


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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2805




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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 04:22:15 PM »

10M would probably be best for local code practice nets.

If you go to 2M and don't have an all-mode transceiver (which includes CW), you can get by using FM with an oscillator sitting next to the microphone.  This isn't really "CW", or even "MCW"; it's FM, but it's legal.

However, remember that FM is a 100% duty cycle mode.  Use low power and keep the transmissions short.  Otherwise, you'll be replacing batteries pretty quickly - and maybe some more expensive components as well.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2009, 09:02:18 PM »

I agree, 10, 6 or maybe 2 m would be OK.

Around here, for reasons I don't know, 2 meters propagates a lot better across town than 10 meters.

Maybe the signal to noise is so bad on 10 meters it just seems that way. I dunno, but 10 m is "the big muddy" (p. seeger) everytime I've tried it.

I haven't tried 6 meters. We still have an analog TV broadcaster at 54(?) MHz, "channel 2" and the word on the street is 6 meters is hardly worth trying because of it. So I haven't tried it...but I will.

You're right about the all mode XCVR, but I figure anyone ready to do CW would have the right radio...although many HF radios, like my FT-450AT don't have VHF like my IC-7000 and FT-100D.

FM Morse code "virtual CW" seems hardly worth the trouble, but I have no reason to know this, as I have not tried to do it. But your point about duty cycle is well taken. I had not considered that for FM VHF Code.

We have a local CW master who expressed an interest in getting involved with this project.

So at least we may have someone with credibility involved, instead of some new-kid-noob-lid (me) trying to start something, hihi.

This is a cool project, Will let you know how it goes.

Thanks again, all, 73

Larry
 
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K5END
Member

Posts: 1309




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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2009, 09:15:09 PM »


Scott, I did tune in and monitor that TX slow net tonight. It was right there where you said it would be. :-)

I just listened a little while, but it sounded like the QNN was not getting responses, or maybe I just could not hear the others. It sounded like straight keys. I've forgotten the QNN CS...I think I heard KD5TXD, which is in TX, ,maybe...KD5EX, but that's AR. ...I dunno. I need to practice copy.

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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2009, 01:17:34 AM »

The key to a local 10 meter net is vert antennas.
73
Bob
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K8JD
Member

Posts: 51




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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2009, 06:39:45 AM »

80M would be good for a weekend daylight local CW net.
the propigation is good for a hundred miles and the long haul qrm is nil in the daylight hours.
The 80M antenna is a problem for some who live in a restricted space but if you can find room for 130 ft of wire in a tree or two, it's well worth the trouble.
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73...John
SKCC 1395T, FISTS 3853
Official US Taxpayer
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