Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 2 meter 2nd rf grounding  (Read 1259 times)
PATRICKKOMAR
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« on: January 12, 2013, 11:47:47 AM »

I'm studding to get my tech license right now so sorry for the no call sign! But as I devouring information studying up for my ticket I've come up with a question the materials I've been reviewing haven't really been able to answer, My shack will have to be on the second floor of my house witch from what I can gather is going to play heck with my RF ground on 2 meter
My station Plans thus far are going to be a Yeasu FT-2900, Samlex SEC-1235M power supply, an old beat up HP laptop, and a Comet GP-3 antenna. I'm still researching in to feed line and a SWR/power meter but i hope to keep my run under 50'.
I had originally Planed to hook every thing to a RF copper bus and then rout it out side and down to a copper clad ground rod about 25' away but have come to think I'd better rethink that plan. Is there an artificial ground out like the MFJ-931 That will work for 2 meter? Is there another/better way to go about dealing with a long 2 meter RF ground?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 11:53:51 AM by PATRICKKOMAR » Logged
N3JBH
Member

Posts: 2358




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 12:02:39 PM »

The RF Ground part is taking care of with the use of the radials on that antenna. I think your confusing RF ground with a DC Ground in this case. Your strap idea make a very good DC ground. Any RF ground would need to resonant  if suspended in the air. Hence the reason for the radials on that antenna.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 12977




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 12:14:50 PM »

You don't need an RF station ground in most cases, certainly not on 2m,
where any such connection to ground is going to be ineffective due to the
length of the wire involved.

Just plug one end of the coax into the antenna, the other end into the
rig, and get on the air.  If the antenna has adjustments, then an SWR
meter might be useful, and often you can find a local ham who can
bring one over and help you get set up:  you don't generally need
to monitor the SWR every time you operate.  (That's more likely the
case on HF when you are adjusting an antenna tuner each time
you change bands.)
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2236




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 01:12:22 PM »

No need for either an RF or DC grounds for a simple 2m setup.

For a 50 foot run, RG-8x/mini-8 would be acceptable.  RG-8 type, 9913, RG-213/214 or LMR400 would be you excellent choices and noticeable lower signal loss.

Don't be afraid to challenge the test.  You probably know more than realize.  In any case, your ticket is a license to life long learning and experimenting!

73, bill
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12639




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 01:22:05 PM »

While you don't need an RF ground because it's included in the antenna (radials), you may need a lightning ground for safety. For example if the antenna is on a metal mast mounted to the roof of the house you would run a ground wire from the bottom of the mast down to a ground rod along side the house. The idea is that if the antenna is hit by lightning or lightning energy is coupled into it or the feed line from a nearby strike then most of the current would flow to Earth via your ground wire rather than following the coax into the house. This ground will have no impact on the performance of the antenna.

Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20537




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 04:42:59 PM »

It's unfortunate that so many published materials, including "user instructions" for ham gear, focus so much on grounding.  I don't blame newcomers being daunted by all that baloney.

For the OP, if you were operating in an airplane, where would your ground be?  Or in your car, or at sea?  Or walking around with a hand-held radio?  Obviously "nowhere," at least with respect to an actual connection to ground.

All that stuff works perfectly without any.

There are reasons to ground things, but an "RF ground to earth" on 2 meters is a near impossibility, and nobody really has one.
Logged
PATRICKKOMAR
Member

Posts: 20




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 08:41:40 PM »

Thanks for the answers! Now that that's been cleared up for me I can forge on with more studying! If the practice tests on this site are any indicator I should be good to go and have a call sign as soon as I can be in the right place at the right time to take a test!

9913, RG-213/214, and LMR400 have all hit the short list for feed line. Just have to do some more reading to figure out whats going to be the best bang for the buck as they all seam to be pretty close in price. A lighting ground is most defiantly in my station plan!
Logged
VE3FMC
Member

Posts: 982


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2013, 03:57:52 AM »

Thanks for the answers! Now that that's been cleared up for me I can forge on with more studying! If the practice tests on this site are any indicator I should be good to go and have a call sign as soon as I can be in the right place at the right time to take a test!

9913, RG-213/214, and LMR400 have all hit the short list for feed line. Just have to do some more reading to figure out whats going to be the best bang for the buck as they all seam to be pretty close in price. A lighting ground is most defiantly in my station plan!

A couple of things to ponder. If you have to put a sharp bend in the coax to route it into the shack, avoid LMR400. You can put bends in it but not as tight as you can with RG-8 or RG-213. If you are under 50 feet I would not bother with LMR400, RG-213 will work.

The Comet antenna does not need adjusting. What you could do is borrow a VHF/UHF SWR power meter to check the SWR after you install the antenna. If it checks out fine then remove the meter. The less connections you have in line when you are dealing with VHF/UHF the better. I do not have my VHF meter in line. I can tell if my antenna is working or not working by signals I receive.

Study hard, get your ticket and start enjoying the hobby. Oh one other thing, the sooner you can move to HF the better off you will be! HF is the meat and potatoes of amateur radio IMO.

Good Luck.
73, Rick VE3FMC
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9879




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2013, 11:41:11 AM »

See if you can find a local club. With some local hams you may be able to pick up a radio, coax, antenna , and all the little odds and ends for free, on loan or for next to nothing.  It never hurts to ask.  for starters you are only talking from your radio to the repeater on top of a hill, so rg8x will work, and even a 1/4 wave ground plane you can make your self out of a so 239 and some welding rod, and so on.  see if there is a local club or a friendly local ham, and go visiting. for repeater and local simplex  you can use an antenna inside the shack in most locations. a J-pole leaning against the wall will do fine,  have fun,
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9879




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2013, 11:47:07 AM »

Patrick, It looks like you live on the west coast, what town do you live in so folks here at eham may be able to give you a hand directly. most hams are pretty nice folks and like to help.  so like if you live in fresno, san fran , or l.a., there may be a local ham to  talk with.  your very own elmer.
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 450




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2013, 08:04:45 PM »

A lighting ground is most defiantly in my station plan!

I wouldn't worry about lightning.  IF, your house takes a direct hit, all the "grounding" in the world won't help.  There have been endless arguments here on eham concerning grounding.  Do a little searching...  For your actual installation, your best bet might be to ask a local electrician.  What is the  electrical code requirement for your insurance company to cover a claim if your house burns down?

Mike
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!