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Author Topic: Guidance from BUG users please.  (Read 5595 times)
K3STX
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Posts: 1050




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« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2013, 01:07:13 PM »

Hey, I shave half my face with my off hand with a straight razor every morning!

Hey, me too!!  I thought the same thing when he talked about using his "off" hand. I wonder how many CW ops are also straight razor users? I'll bet it is higher than the proportion that are phone ops.

paul

And this ability to use your off-hand is important; do it poorly and you actually DIE!!!! Grin

pauil
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KE6EE
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Posts: 447




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« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2013, 04:17:51 PM »


Hey, me too!!  I thought the same thing when he talked about using his "off" hand. I wonder how many CW ops are also straight razor users? I'll bet it is higher than the proportion that are phone ops.
paul

I used a straight razor before I decided I would rather do something other than shave. However, I never did shave with a straight razor in my left hand while sending on a bug with my right.
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N1RND
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2013, 04:19:24 PM »

My Dad is lending me his Bencher Paddles.  I've tried them on the rare occasion at his station.  I like the short throw (like in manual transmissions).  Maybe I was not cut out to use a bug.
If I like the paddles I'll buy a pair of my own.
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N4OI
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Posts: 210




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« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2013, 04:35:13 AM »

A different question, but still within the subject of this thread:  I can work CW at about 28 to 30 wpm with a paddle and keyer...  love it... rag chews are very comfortable.   I recently got an old Vibroplex because I thought I should learn to work a bug.  After adding some weight and making some adjustments, I am now sending fairly OK code at a bit over 20 wpm... still LOTS of room for improvement.

Here is the question: Am I going to "undo" my paddle skills by working with the bug?  So far, I seem to be able to make the switch back and forth, but I am just a few days into the bug.  Even though working the Vibroplex is fun from an historical and mechanical viewpoint, I want to make sure I will still be able to make long, effortless QSOs using my paddle going forward.  Do any of you all work both paddles and bugs?  If so, what have been your experiences and do you have any advice?  Thanks!

73 ES GOD BLESS U ES URS DE KEN N4OI   Grin 
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K3STX
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Posts: 1050




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« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2013, 05:25:23 AM »

Ken,

I was a paddles guy for 30 years, and about 4 years ago I got my first bug. And never looked back. I go back and forth between bugs up to 25 wpm and iambic paddles up to 40 wpm. No problems. SOMETIMES when I get started on the bug I find that my first few dashes are HELD really long time: I am expecting it to stop all on its own (like with the paddles). But this is 15 seconds or so of "muscle/mental confusion" and quickly passes. I use the paddles exclusively in contests, so no problems there.

Good for you starting to use bugs. I think it is important to keep it going for future generations, so we can teach OUR kids how to do it.

paul
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ZENKI
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Posts: 980




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« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2013, 02:10:04 AM »

There are a lot of BUG operators who send bad code and pass it off as their "fist style" which is a nonsense argument. You either send code properly or you dont do it at all. Most  BUG operators  are excellent operators and there is that small percentage that just send out utter garbage. The same goes for straight key senders. These bad operators really need someone  to tell them that their code sending skills are terrible.  I simply dont answer some operators whose bug code is almost from another planet. I mean its nice that they are trying but at the end of the day if you cant get the message through in manner that most operators  can read you not accomplishing anything. Genuine lake Eyrie swing is perfectly readable, its just unfortunate  that the bad bug operators call this their  version for  the lake eyrie / banana swing, its just bad sending end of story. Listening to bad bug sent code  is the worst code you can listen too. Even badly  sent straight key code you can decipher.
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N5RDE
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2013, 06:24:46 PM »

I'm late to this discussion, but as a fellow left-hander I encourage you to stick with a right-handed bug.  If you have a version with a knob/paddle assembly, you might reverse it for the ergonomic benefit.

Vibroplex, Vizkey and Begali will all be happy to build a left handed bug for you, but you are likely never to see another one.  If you see a classic bug come up at auction you will be out of luck.  If you want to operate a bug at a Field Day station you will likely be out of luck, unless you bring your own.  IMO, that's too limiting.

Some things that are right-hand oriented are a serious pain for left handed people to use, but moving a lever back and fourth is no big deal.  So what if you are doing it 'backwards'?  Using a bug key is a much less useful skill if you can't sit down and use most of the equipment you are likely to find.
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N8NSN
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Posts: 283


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« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2013, 12:32:17 PM »

I thought I was the only one using right hand bug keys with my left hand... There are a number of possible reasons people would do this. Being left handed would be a primary reason. However, I'm right handed here.

I agree with several who have said... if this works for you, stay with it.

My reasons were comfort. Playing bass for 35+ years; using the thumb for heavier note strikes and the fingers for lighter notes has been "standard" as my bethod. So, when switching from a straight key to an iambic key - paddle set combo - the natural feel, for my comfort and "brain wiring" was DAH = Thumb and DIT = Fingers. Right handedly... Then becoming interested in mastering the bug key was next. My first bug was a right handed bug. Tried to "relearn" as finger = Dah - thumb = Dit and FAILURE was the climatic push to give left handed use a whirl... SUCCESS ! So, in all this mayhem it has been discovered that I can use either hand with the thumbed dah - fingered dit method. Proficiently no less.

Any one have a left handed bug to sell at a good price? I'd like to add a bug to the right side of my operations desk...

Lastly, it was decided to "flip" the knob/paddle pieces on all my bugs... Looked weird at first, but the knob under the finger just "feels" better... As they're designed for, nomatter dit or dah sent with fingers. Though the knob was designed to the bugs so one could use it as a side action straight key.

73
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