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Author Topic: Tibet active until October 7th!  (Read 3276 times)
NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« on: October 02, 2012, 01:42:59 PM »

A little while back I asked if anybody in the forum had worked a BY9 or a BY0.  If my memory is correct I think a station from the UK was the only station who claimed to have worked a BY9 or a BY0. I just worked BY1WXD/O from Tibet on 14.020 transmitting up 1.  He's coming in at about 579 with a very good fist.  Even though this does not count as a DX entity I have been trying to work Tibet especially and all the Chinese zones for some time now.  I consider it one of my better catches due to its rarity.  QSL is via BA4TB.

Here are some excerpts from their QRZ page:

" BY1WXD/0 will attend the Tibet on the Air (2012-WAPC-XZ) activity from Sep 27th to Oct 7th 2012, 10 days in total. The DX event is the first offically announced DX-pedition activity inTibet Autonomous Region of China by the Chinese amateur radio operators. 2 or 3 radio stations for this event will be set up in Doilungdêgên County, which is near the city of Lhasa. We sincerely welcome the DX chasers all over the world to work with us during this event.

 A brief Introduction to Doilungdêgên County

Doilungdêgên County is located in central and southern Tibet and is a suburb of Lhasa. It covers an area of 2682 square kilometers, with 9.6 million mu of cultivated land. It has jurisdiction over 11 townships, one town, and 89 village committees. Other towns include Donggar and Ryugo. The county was established in under the Lhasa Municipal People's Government. The Yarlung Tsangpo river (Brahmaputra) flows through the county from west to east. The maximum altitude is 5,500 meters, with the lowest elevation at 3640 meters.The valley to the southeast of the county is flat and open and is a temperate semi-arid monsoon plateau area. Precipitation during the rainy season is concentrated with intense solar radiation but a low temperature. Annual sunshine is about 3,000 hours, with an annual frost-free period of 120 days. Annual precipitation is 440 millimeters on average and natural disasters, droughts, hail, frost, snow, pests, floods and so on are common."

73,

Chris/NU1O
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KH6DC
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Posts: 639




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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2012, 02:24:52 PM »

Can't even hear them - always had trouble in that area - Bhutan, Nepal, Myanmar, tibet, Mongolia but this past week I worked JT1E in Mongolia during the CQ WW RTTY contest so things are looking up. Cheesy
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 02:38:58 PM »

Delwyn, take a look at the station JT5DX has.  That would be impressive in the US or Europe but he is in a remote part of Mongolia. He was bombing in this morning on 15 meters and I had no trouble working him today or on all the other occasions I have worked him.

I think he runs a farm, or perhaps a ranch.  I see those watering circles which are common in the Western USA when I zoom in on his QTH on satellite mode.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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M0TTB
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Posts: 196




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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2012, 02:27:14 AM »

A little while back I asked if anybody in the forum had worked a BY9 or a BY0.  If my memory is correct I think a station from the UK was the only station who claimed to have worked a BY9 or a BY0."

73,

Chris/NU1O

Hi Chris,
Yep, I was the one who had worked a 9.... but this 0 was definitely new for me, great signals in EU from them, I even managed them on 10m FM! (although it seems only one other EU did that). Good to see a lot of youngsters on this activation, all of them sound as if they are enjoying it and full of enthusiasm.
Looking forward to the weekend when the BY contest gets going, should be some nice new regions for the taking.
http://www.mulandxc.org/?page_id=2

BY does seem to have a large % of 'aligators' though.

73
Andy
« Last Edit: October 03, 2012, 02:31:00 AM by M0TTB » Logged
NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2012, 10:59:54 AM »

Hi Andy,

Thanks for the information about the Chinese contest.  I was not aware of it but I will try to work as many provinces as I can. I have been fascinated with China since I was a young SWL.  I recall the night Radio Peking announced the death of Chairman Mao and I still recall the nightly criticism of the "Gang of Four".  You younger hams will have to do a search to find out who the Gang of Four were.

I'm glad you worked the station from Tibet. It seems the age of the hams in China is polar opposite to that of Europe and the USA.  There are many young Chinese hams in their 20's and 30's which bodes well for the hobby in China.

Good luck and very 73,

Chris/NU1O
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K0RS
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Posts: 706




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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2012, 02:59:36 AM »

The first Chinese station that I ever worked...back in the 1980s...was BY0AA in Urumqi.

That was in western China, but far north of Tibet.

http://hamgallery.com/qsl/country/China/by0aa.htm

That was quite a DX catch back then.  It was one of the only "official" Chinese stations on the air.  I actually got a QSL direct.  China was about to come out of looong period of radio silence.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 03:03:58 AM by K0RS » Logged
W1VT
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Posts: 823




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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2012, 05:56:31 AM »

My first Chinese station was BY1PK.  When I got started I lived down the street from Jack Wada, KH6LG, an old timer who had worked Chinese stations in the old days.  

He was quite a help--I'm sure I tore up the bands so that he couldn't DX when I was on--but he said not a word about that--figuring that as a 15 year old this would only be temporary--and it was--I moved away in less than a year to Honolulu.  

Tibet is yet another country I didn't expect to work for Diamond DXCC--I'm now up to 192!
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 06:02:58 AM by W1VT » Logged
NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2012, 10:55:19 AM »


Tibet is yet another country I didn't expect to work for Diamond DXCC--I'm now up to 192!

I never even thought about the DXCC Diamond award.  I just knew Tibet was very rare.

You have motivated me to total my Diamond countries. 

Thanks!

73,

Chris/NU1O
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K0RS
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Posts: 706




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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2012, 09:21:15 PM »

 When I got started I lived down the street from Jack Wada, KH6LG, an old timer who had worked Chinese stations in the old days.

Back in the day it was only the OTs that had worked China.  Nobody had DXCC #1 as China was simply unavailable for years and years.  There were also a number of countries on the FCC's "banned" list.  One of the FCC's rules was that no one contact a country that "objected to" amateur communication, and a number of them did.

I was in the army during the Viet Nam war and worked for a time at a MARS station at Ft Leonard Wood, MO.  We worked Viet Nam daily running phone patches just outside the amateur bands using amateur equipment (Collins, Drake, and Henry).  Viet Nam was on the banned list.  The irony wasn't lost on me that I was routinely working one of the rarest, indeed entirely unavailable, countries in the world while I couldn't contact that country as a civilian for DXCC credit!
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NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2012, 09:39:58 PM »


I was in the army during the Viet Nam war and worked for a time at a MARS station at Ft Leonard Wood, MO.  We worked Viet Nam daily running phone patches just outside the amateur bands using amateur equipment (Collins, Drake, and Henry).  Viet Nam was on the banned list.  The irony wasn't lost on me that I was routinely working one of the rarest, indeed entirely unavailable, countries in the world while I couldn't contact that country as a civilian for DXCC credit!

Great story!  That's the US Government at work.

Just curious.  If the Vietnamese Govt. "objected to" amateur radio did the MARS stations in Vietnam use their US calls?

73,

Chris/NU1O



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K0RS
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Posts: 706




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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2012, 10:09:30 PM »

Great story!  That's the US Government at work.

Just curious.  If the Vietnamese Govt. "objected to" amateur radio did the MARS stations in Vietnam use their US calls?

73,

Chris/NU1O

The stations we worked used Vietnamese amateur callsigns starting with XV prefixes, only adding to the irony.  All the MARS ops were American G.I.s of course.  Yet another governmental mystery.  

Several years back I purchased a Vibroplex bug on eBay.  When it arrived, I was amazed to turn it over and find a Vietnamese callsign inscribed on the bottom.  I'm at work now or I could give your the callsign.  No doubt the bug made the trip to and from Viet Nam with a G.I. MARS op.  A nice piece of history and a real bonus that I hadn't expected when I bought the key.  I wouldn't be surprised if the seller was unaware of the significance of the call.  How would you like to have been the original owner of the key, no doubt a ham (all of us MARS ops were), marooned in Viet Nam and on what would have been the ultimate DXpedition but prohibited from using it in the ham bands?  Arrgh...
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 10:33:39 PM by K0RS » Logged
NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2012, 11:05:34 PM »

The stations we worked used Vietnamese amateur callsigns starting with XV prefixes, only adding to the irony.  All the MARS ops were American G.I.s of course.  Yet another governmental mystery.  

Several years back I purchased a Vibroplex bug on eBay.  When it arrived, I was amazed to turn it over and find a Vietnamese callsign inscribed on the bottom.  I'm at work now or I could give your the callsign.  No doubt the bug made the trip to and from Viet Nam with a G.I. MARS op.  A nice piece of history and a real bonus that I hadn't expected when I bought the key.  I wouldn't be surprised if the seller was unaware of the significance of the call.  How would you like to have been the original owner of the key, no doubt a ham (all of us MARS ops were), marooned in Viet Nam and on what would have been the ultimate DXpedition but prohibited from using it in the ham bands?  Arrgh...

The story got even better.

I'm glad YOU got the Vibroplex bug.  You certainly earned it for your service during the war and your work with the MARS stations.

Thanks for telling us the rest of the story!

73,

Chris/NU1O
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K0RS
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Posts: 706




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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2012, 03:09:17 AM »

Hey Chris.  This story gets even better.  The call on the bottom of the key is XV5AC.  Turns out it belonged to one John Lunsford, who called himself Chester on the air.  He was instrumental in getting the ban on Viet Nam lifted.  It never occured to me to Google the callsign until this thread jogged my memory about the key.  I got multiple hits, but here's an interesting one:

http://qsl-history.webs.com/jinnybeyerpagetwo.htm

Scroll down below the picture of Fr Moran, 9N1MM, to the "Viet Nam story."  Holy cow, the key has some history!

Also some nice photos of old Chinese QSLs, (just so I can't be accused of hijacking the thread!).
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NU1O
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Posts: 2645




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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2012, 04:35:02 PM »

I just spent close to an hour reading the stories and looking at the old QSLs.

That was a remarkable story about the US ambassadors to Vietnam and Nepal, who were married, communicating via ham radio because it was more reliable than the telephone. 

Another great story was the King of Nepal getting Father Moran's license renewed when he would not let the head of Tourism's son into his school. You can't make stuff like that up.

Jinny Beyer was indeed a very beautiful woman. She could've had a career in the movies if she didn't have her quilt business and spend so much time overseas.

73 and thanks,

Chris/NU1O
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W1VT
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Posts: 823




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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2013, 01:54:14 PM »

Just got a card confirming my QSO with Tibet!

Also got a card from HT9H for 17/80M--so I'm now up to 77/45 on 80M.

Zack W1VT
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