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Author Topic: Wire Types ?  (Read 1496 times)
KB1YWP
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« on: January 21, 2013, 07:32:05 AM »

Anyone familiar with this type of wire ? What I have is 10 G  THNN or THWN

would it be a good type for a dipole ?  It is coated & says gas & oil resistant rated at 600 W
have had this stuff laying around for years. 
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K5LXP
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2013, 08:01:44 AM »

I think you mean THHN/THWN.  Rated for 600 volts, not watts.

This soft copper wire may stretch initially when installed but will stabilize.  The nylon outer sheath on this insulation will crack and peel off after a couple years in the sun but the underlying PVC is more durable.  It works great for most antennas and if you have it around already, even better.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KB1YWP
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2013, 09:40:15 AM »

Many thanks, you were correct on the 600 v still learning to slow down when typing.  Roll Eyes
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AC2EU
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2013, 09:51:52 AM »

It's a lot heavier than you need, but if you have it on hand, why not use it?
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W6EM
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2013, 01:50:18 PM »

It is soft-drawn copper and the insulation just adds weight that contributes to the sag between support points.  It will stretch more than enameled soft copper will because of the extra weight per foot, adding to the need to retension it from time to time.

Being soft, it can also flex more and work harden at attachment points and break.  Medium-hard-drawn or copperclad steel wire are both best for antennas.



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G3RZP
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2013, 01:53:54 PM »

Stretch the length between two supports - trees are good. Use turnbuckles to stretch it, tightening them up each day. As the amount of stretch decreases, keep going until it gets really hard. Now you have the equivalent of  hard drawn copper wire  but some what thinner....
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KE3WD
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2013, 03:12:38 PM »

A rope at one end, run over a pulley to a hanging weight is automatic stretch tensioning. 

Use of antenna tuner recommended, or be prepared to have to go out there and shorten the thing again if it stretches out of your tuning point. 

73
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KB3HG
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« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2013, 08:16:35 PM »

THNN or THWN are the insulation specification, oil resistant ect. It's industrial type wire. The clear seal covering bakes and falls off after a few years. still makes great dipoles. I used it many years ago. the NEC code book has a listing of many types.
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K4DPK
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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2013, 09:19:42 PM »

Makes really great antenna wire.  The insulation protects the wire, and facilitates soldering if you want to make changes later on.  The wire will be untarnished under the insulation.

If you're worried about stretching, you can pre-stretch it.  Tie it to a tree, the other end to the car trailer hitch, etc. and stretch it about 3-4 percent. 

I've been using this stuff close to sixty years and have never had any of it break.

BTW....10 ga wire is fine.  A little heavier, but it may have slightly more bandwidth.

Phil C. Sr.
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KB1YWP
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« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2013, 04:13:01 PM »

Ok, some great ideas here. Thanks for the tips.  Shocked
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N6AJR
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« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2013, 04:24:53 PM »

and if nothing else, you can always hang up a rope or cord and use it to support the wire.  perfect for a fan dipole...
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W6EM
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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2013, 07:49:46 PM »

and if nothing else, you can always hang up a rope or cord and use it to support the wire.  perfect for a fan dipole...

Especially when the cord gets wet.........after having been coated with dust or airborne salts.
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W4VR
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2013, 01:24:23 PM »

That's what I use for my antennas...the stranded type.  After a few months/years of exposure to the elements you will see the coating fall off or dangle from the insulation. 
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