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Author Topic: Desktop shelves  (Read 3420 times)
WX2S
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Posts: 735




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« on: January 26, 2013, 01:56:58 AM »

Hi, all,

I'm about to need a lot more space on my desktop. Have been making do with some metal desktop shelves from Staples that are barely adequate. Does anyone know where I could find an adjustable desktop shelving unit suitable for hamming, maybe with dividers that can be repositioned?

73,
- WX2S
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
KA4POL
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Posts: 1995




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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2013, 02:05:41 AM »

I bought plywood and did that myself to fit exactly.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2013, 02:34:54 AM »

Visit the web sites for Lowes, Home Depot, etc.  There are plenty of products for shelving and even more for organizing storage space in the garage, closet or kitchen.  Keep an open mind for things like under-counter storage bins and hanging shelves.

It's a 3-D world.  Think that way.............   Tongue
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K2DC
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 03:55:34 AM »

Ditto - Built one myself.  Got nice Red Oak planks from Home Depot and stained them Cherry to come close to matching the desks.  There's a pic on QRZ.com

73,

Don, K2DC
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W5FYI
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 04:26:08 AM »

Visit WalMart or Target and look at their modular closet shelving kits. GL
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W1JKA
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2013, 05:19:45 AM »

     Also plenty of solid wood bookcases to be found at a Goodwill or used furniture stores in various sizes cheap that can be cut down by you or someone else to fit your needs.
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WX2S
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2013, 08:10:24 AM »

I know I can build them; I was hoping that somebody made something like Legos for hams.  Grin

Took a look at the modular shelving; nothing seems really suitable.

Any thoughts?

-WX2S
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
WB7TDG
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2013, 09:24:32 AM »

this is what I use...
http://www.lowes.com/pd_7842-62348-LO7842_0__?productId=3068013&Ntt=white+shelving&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dwhite%2Bshelving&facetInfo=
really nice stuff...don't even have to paint it
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K8AXW
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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2013, 10:04:20 AM »

2S:  Your problem is shared by me and probably many more.  I built my radio desk (QRZ.com) many years ago from 1/2" plywood covered with 1/4" paneling.  (it was eventually covered with carpet)  I supported the top shelf with pieces of 2 X 10 cut at angle.  It worked fine for several years but then I noticed that the plywood started to sag in a 26" unsupported span.

Based on this experience, I suggest you use plywood of no less than 1" thick and don't leave it unsupported or reinforced with steel for more than 18".

 Plywood is made from thin sheets of wood with the grain running in alternate directions.  It has a lower tendency to bow.  Wood shelving, which is only 3/4" thick will bow much easier if it isn't supported.

If you find it necessary to use a long and unsupported shelf, consider reinforcing it with a piece of angle iron with at least 1/2" flats, with 3/4" being better yet.

This is assuming that sometime, either now or in the future, you will be loading the shelf with something heavy like a linear or large power supply.

You can pretty well figure on building what you need rather than shop for it.  I've never found anything suitable at Lowe's or Home Depot.

Al - K8AXW



« Last Edit: January 26, 2013, 10:11:31 AM by K8AXW » Logged
WB6BYU
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« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2013, 11:26:25 AM »

My assemble-it-yourself computer hutch has a separate set of top shelves
that might work (depending on how heavy your equipment is.)  You may
find other similar items (printer stands, etc.) in the office furniture or
bookcase section.

It does, of course, depend on what you want to support:  a KW amp, or
a DX-100 or Viking Valiant with a Hammurland receiver, is not going to last
very long on much of the modern household shelving.  (Or perhaps I
should say, the shelving won't last very long under the equipment.)

We ended up with industrial shelving:  steel uprights with 8 holes per foot,
and steel shelves that bolt onto it.  I have 18", 24" and 36" deep shelves,
in 3' or 4' widths.  The stronger types have thicker shelf supports, which
result in a bit more wasted vertical space.  Some types provide a heavy
steel rim around the outside to hold plywood shelves.  We have a surplus
shelving dealer in Portland that carries several types, as well as wire
racks that should work for lighter gear.  You might have to saw a couple
of the 6' or 8' vertical supports in half to make a set that will sit on your
desk.

Or, if you want to make something similar, most hardware stores carry
angle steel with pre-punched holes.  Use 4 pieces for the upright corners,
bolt additional lengths around the perimeter for each shelf, and lay a piece
of plywood on top.  An assembly with 2 shelves each 18" x 36" and 18"
spacing would then require 10 lengths (two sawn in half) bolted together -
that still requires some assembly, but may be easier than finished wooden
shelves, and the heights can be readjusted as desired.
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WX2S
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Posts: 735




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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2013, 02:12:11 PM »

Problem mitigated, if not exactly solved. Made some wood blocks and bolted them onto the legs of the Staples desk shelf. This raises it up enough to get the new toy under it.

73,
- WX2S.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
AD6KA
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Posts: 2237




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« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2013, 02:21:03 PM »

A lot depends on how much total weight you want
your shelf or shelves to hold.  You should also leave
enough room for further station expansion, if you
are a fairly new ham. (Which I was when I had these
shelves built) I wanted one long
shelf in a corner arrangement, separate from the
desk, with enough strength to hold an HF amplifier (or two)
and accessories. I also wanted them built 3" from the wall,
so cables can be run behind the shelf to the rigs
on the desk.
This hides the "rats nest" of cables
and makes a cleaner appearance.

Not being very handy with woodworking, and not having
the tools, I hired a finish carpenter. For strength he bolted
the shelve supports into the vertical frame supports behind
the drywall on 18" centers. He was also able to use
oak that matched the desk I bought. The result was
spectacular and makes a great looking shack setup.

There have been changes over the years, but
here is an old photo of the results. Well worth the
money I think, as we were upgrading our home
interior at the time. I also added a nice world wall map:
http://www.qsl.net/ad6ka/ad6ka/Page_2x.html

GL ES 73, Ken  AD6LA
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NR4C
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Posts: 308




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« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2013, 08:59:04 AM »

I suggest you build it yourself.  I tried the Closet Organizer approach, and the neat modular stuff from various stores.  Problem was, the typical 1/2 - 5/8 inch won't support much weight, certainly  not a Kenwood TS-570 transciever. 

Built some myself with good 1 inch (3/4") solid wood, or 3/4 cabinet plywood, and it works fine.  Lowes and Home Depot will make the cuts for you, some for free, more for maybe 50 cents a cut.  Well worth it if you don't have tools.

FWIW:  I find that the neat fine tooth Japanese type pull saws work much better than the usual hand saws, and they are sharp and will cut most anything.

...bill  nnr4c
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KJ4I
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2013, 09:27:13 PM »

I have built mine using various sizes of all-thread  rods for the supports at each corner. Easy to level and change the heights of the shelves should you ever need to change the dimensions. Has worked out pretty  good for me for years and is a pretty modular and adaptable system.
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