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Author Topic: Maritime Radio Historical Society 'Night of Nights  (Read 479 times)
W5ESE
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Posts: 550


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« on: July 08, 2009, 10:16:31 AM »

For anyone interested in getting some easy-to-hear Morse Code
practice, tune in this Sunday evening to the Maritime Radio
Historical Society 'Night of Nights'.

When I was a teenager (mid 1970's), I could tune a multi-band radio
across the shortwave segments, and easily hear these extremely strong
maritime shore stations sending beacon transmissions. Those stations
are no longer on the air, although once a year, during the 'Night of
Nights', a few of them return to service.

Even for those not familiar with the code, because the stations send
the same sequence repetitively (the "wheel"), after listening a few
times, it is not hard to figure out who you are listening to. Just have
a printout of the code handy.

A very modest shortwave receiver can easily hear several of these.

It's a fun way to work in a little code practice, and experience
some radio history.

More information about the 'Night of Nights' schedule is at:

http://www.radiomarine.org/non10.html

Also take a look at the YouTube videos and photographs of these
mammoth transmitters and antennas at:

http://www.radiomarine.org

73
Scott
W5ESE
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KK4E
Member

Posts: 7




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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2009, 01:44:49 PM »

Night of Nights is a special annual celebration, as noted on the web page.

However, KSM is on the air every weekend (Saturdays), as noted on the KSM link below the Night of Nights link. So marine CW is still actively alive (in a historic sense).

Also K6KPH is the amateur radio counterpart to the MRHS KSM/KPH lineup, and often supports the ARRL for west coast broadcasts, such as this last Field Day teleprinter bulletins, and also "stands watch" on the amateur radio CW bands (see web page).

I encourage every CW enthusiast to take a look at the entire MHRS web page - a lot of fascinating info. CW is alive and well! Long live 600 Meters!

There are also a number of historic ship-shore stations that have gone - or are going - QRV.

I also recommend joining the MRHS Yahoo! group for the latest news.

73,
Danny
KK4E
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