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Author Topic: Sending with longer gaps between letters  (Read 432 times)
VK5DO
Member

Posts: 79




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« on: July 14, 2009, 05:54:28 AM »

Just learning CW and at this stage I'm most comfortable sending (practicing only at this stage) with a character speed of about 20WPM but I need a bit more time than that between letters to think about what I'm doing and wind up with a total average WPM of about 12 or so.  I guess instead of one "dit" between each charachter I've got a "dah".

Is it ok to send like this or should I just try and work at 12 and slowly speed up?

I suspect this is due to my learning based initally via Farnsworth rather than starting out on Koch. I did learn all my characters at high (30WPM Character speed) speed very quickly - just need to shorten up the thinking/recognition time between letters.

Thanks.

Dene
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WW5AA
Member

Posts: 2088




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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2009, 06:51:17 AM »

Dene,

You are doing great. Don't worry about the space between characters it will decrease in time. My biggest gripe is those that run all the characters and words together! I would rather work some one sending at your rate then some "ham" fist. (:-)

73 de Lindy
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N3DF
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Posts: 250




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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2009, 06:57:45 PM »

My view--from about 12 wpm on up, normal spacing is the clearest and easiest to read.  Don't worry about increasing your speed.  If you make a few QSOs each day, your CW abilities will increase without much conscious effort and you will enjoy your time on the air.  

Neil N3DF
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Neil N3DF
W7ETA
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Posts: 2528




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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2009, 12:12:24 AM »

My theory is that if you learn CW by listening to great or perfect code, you'll be able to send good code with just a little practice.  If you are sending dits and dahs at the correct lengths, them spending a little extra time between characters and more for in between words, most people will be able to copy your sending.

73 from HOT and HUMID Tucson
Bob
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KC2TKD
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2009, 07:34:23 AM »

Dene,
I can relate with your "problem" with code. I am trying to re-learn code. I was ok with code back in the late 60's studying for my novice. (which I never took as I could not get anyone to give me a ride to a FCC exam site)I have a tendency to send much faster, 18 to 22 wpm, than I can comfortably receive, 12 wpm,  prompting a returning station to reply at a speed I just can't copy. But every QSO so far has been understanding and many seem to prefer me to send faster as long as my code is comprehensible. I also try to keep my QSO's simple as I get lost in a long ragchew. But that will change with time. I have noticed that I am starting to instanty recognize some words. Most of the CW operators really want to help others with thier code skills. I try to stay on 40 or 80 meters in the sections of the band available to techs since I can usually find someone at my level. I also try to catch the W1AW practice as this is copying in "the real world" with fading signals, QRN and QRM and not a perfect environment like a CD. My family gets a good laugh at all the sheets of paper around with seemingly misc. letters all over it. They just don't get it. And take notice that many operators with "perfect" copy and sending skills are using a computer and keyboard, not sending with a fist! Have fun and maybe we will share a QSO some day.
73 de kc2tkd
Frank
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2753




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« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2009, 11:04:30 AM »

KC2TKD wrote:  "I can relate with your "problem" with code. I am trying to re-learn code. I was ok with code back in the late 60's studying for my novice. (which I never took as I could not get anyone to give me a ride to a FCC exam site)...".

In the late 60s (as well as in the very EARLY 60s), the Novice and Conditional tests were given by a volunteer examiner, who had to hold a General class license or higher.  You had to find such a VE yourself; there weren't any VECs back then.

My Novice test VE was my high school electronics teacher in October, 1959.  This was in Las Vegas.  The closest FCC office was in Los Angeles.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KC2TKD
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2009, 08:42:29 PM »

I wish I had known that at that time. I spent many hours studying for that exam and never got the chance to take it. Then other things came into my life and took all my attention, GIRLS!! Oh well.
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N5XM
Member

Posts: 242




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« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2009, 03:01:54 PM »

Do the best you can and you will do fine.  Proper spacing is critical to sending easy to copy CW because it allows you to pace your text or exchange like a metronome.  The only time I will change a thing is when I'm working above 40-45 wpm.  I will weight the dahs a bit heavier because at higher speeds it sounds better to me. I hear the dahs better making it easier for me to have a good rhythm and meter.
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VK5DO
Member

Posts: 79




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« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2009, 03:21:32 PM »

I guess my main concern is that if I send with character speed at about 25 or so (which I'm most comfortable with) but with a total word speed of about 12 ie- big gaps between the characters, someone recieving might think I'm ok at reading at 25 (which I'm definately not) and send to me at that.

It's just that sending characters at 12 sounds sooo slow.  And I can read characters at 25 as long as there's big gaps in between to give me time to process what I'm hearing but I can't expect to recieve CW in that way.

I think to avoid confusion to anyone I better just practice more and get faster overall - particularly at reading.  

Thanks all for your replies.

Yours,

Dene
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