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Author Topic: How to properly join in a QSO on HF...  (Read 3854 times)
N9NLU
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Posts: 6




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« on: January 30, 2013, 11:57:33 PM »

I'm new to the HF realm having upgraded to General late December ( granted Jan 4 2013 ). However I've been tuning around the HF bands, very much enjoying some of the conversations being heard on 80m... I also know some people get kind of bent, irked, tee'd off  ... if someone busts into their conversation.

I'm normally the listener - but sometimes a topic comes up and I would like to join in. I would toss in a quick couple words on the topic along with my callsign and then wait my turn. It usually turns out that because I'm only running 100W, that my signal is typically lower than the other(s) and sometimes have to fish me out of the static but they would have a chat and what not... but only for a couple minutes and then - they would check out.

Am I being rude for joining in like that and they are checking out because they are ticked off that someone that they don't know joined in? What is the "ham accepted way" of joining in an ongoing conversation ( if any )

Thanks

Dave / N9NLU



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KA4POL
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Posts: 1978




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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2013, 02:44:34 AM »

Asking for a 'ham accepted way' would mean there is a rule. I think you are doing that correctly in a polite manner. However, not everybody is polite. Some hams think they are far superior and even don't answer if someone new calls in. Some other hams think they don't have to contribute to the discussion and try to deviate from the current topic. That is also not a good way.
I'd say this is in no way different to the way you would join a conversation of people you don't know at some public place. The basic rule is practice politeness.
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K2DC
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2013, 03:22:26 AM »

I don't dee anything wrong with what you're doing.  Typically I will say something like "info" or "comment" and my call, and see what happens.  Usually I will get picked up in a round or so.  And don't be too concerned about being rude.  If they're not receptive to others joining in, they may just not acknowledge your call.  That's your cue to move on.

73,

Don, K2DC
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SWMAN
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Posts: 562




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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2013, 07:05:30 AM »

All that I ever say is Hello, someone usually responds with, who said hello !! to easy for me !!   73  Jim W5JJG
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AC2EU
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2013, 07:45:40 AM »

I'm relatively new also, but one of the more common methods I've heard to join was to wait for a lul or when someone has finished speaking and quickly announce your call sign. Most of the time they will acknowledge the "breaker" and ask who you are . However there are some more clannish groups, particularly on 80,  who will ignore you or may even become annoyed. Just move on. It's them, not you!
In fact,there are several frequencies on 80 that one should actually avoid, IMO!
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K5LXP
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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2013, 07:52:08 AM »

Quote
How to properly join in a QSO on HF...

Have something useful/interesting/relevant to say.  It is no less rude to interrupt a conversation on the radio as it is in person.  However, if what you have to say fits with the conversation, you will likely be welcomed in. 


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2013, 07:56:33 AM »

Well, the 75 meter phone band is often rather noisy and there may be other reasons why your signal is a hard copy as well. 

Antenna, Antenna and Antenna. 

A lot of the hams you hear are not only using good to great antennas for the band, they are also likely running a bit of heat as well. 

But before you try to solve the issue with more power, by all means do whatever you can to improve the antenna situation.  Maybe a 75 meter Loop is in your future, if you have the real estate. 


73
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K8AXW
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« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2013, 08:58:52 AM »

2EU has the answer that has been the more or less accepted practice for as long as I've been a ham.  That is to simply wait for a brief lull and give your call one time and then wait.

As another pointed out, most of the time you will be picked up because someone in the roundtable will have heard you.  If they don't acknowledge you within a reasonable amount of time then insert your call again.  If you don't get picked up, move on.

One thing to avoid is to use the word "BREAK."  I've always heard that is used to break into a roundtable because you have emergency traffic or notice.

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WB2WIK
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« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2013, 10:25:02 AM »

In my experience, 80m (75m) is probably the worst band of all for "breaking in" to ongoing QSOs.

I'd pick a different band.

As already stated, if you have something very relevant to add to the conversation, e.g., "Yeah, I had an '87 Vette also and the damned power windows stuck just like you described.  I found a fix for it..." or something very related to their ongoing discussion, I think you'd likely be welcomed in.  If not, I'd not bother trying to join.

Bands like 17m are much "friendlier" to break-ins.  20m and 40m can be, also, but not quite as much as 17m.

The "old crony" thing has been going on with 75m for a very long time.  It's the main reason I almost never use that band, and I'm neither young nor newly licensed.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1060




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« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2013, 02:36:06 PM »

I have been a Ham for over 50 years. The proper way to join a QSO is to simply give your call during a break in the conversation. No other information is required. If the party's talking wish to bring you into there QSO they will acknowledge your call. Then you wait for one of them to give your call and say go ahead. I have been doing this since the mid 1950s and as far as I know it has not changed. If your call is not acknowledged, it means they can nor hear you, or they do not wish you to come into the QSO, although this is rare.

I hope this helps,

73s

K2OWK
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K4RVN
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Posts: 768




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« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2013, 06:07:40 PM »

Like K2OWK, I just wait for a pause, and give my call. Also like someone else said, 75 meters is a tough band especially at night to be recognized. In the daytime you would fare better. Also they won't talk to you if you have a weak signal and the rest are big guns. This is a general statement and there are exceptions. 40 meters is the same way to some extent at night. They have regular groups that meet on a frequency every night it seems. I do get on 40 by calling CQ at night sometimes, but in general I don't try the groups unless it is very late at night. I stay off 75 except to listen sometimes at night. K2OWK and my views are the same from what was posted. If you don't run an amp 75 would be a poor choice to break at night, 40 meters not much better.

Frank
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1737




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« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2013, 08:12:14 PM »

2EU has the answer that has been the more or less accepted practice for as long as I've been a ham.  That is to simply wait for a brief lull and give your call one time and then wait.

As another pointed out, most of the time you will be picked up because someone in the roundtable will have heard you.  If they don't acknowledge you within a reasonable amount of time then insert your call again.  If you don't get picked up, move on.

One thing to avoid is to use the word "BREAK."  I've always heard that is used to break into a roundtable because you have emergency traffic or notice.


  I agree, try not to use the word "break".  Many hams associate that term directly with CB radio, and could get very annoyed when they hear it.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2367




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« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2013, 11:06:35 AM »

Particularly on 75m, the groups talk for longer periods, and part of the courtesy and camaraderie is sticking around and developing the relationships, rather than making a drive-bye comment.

In any case, wait for a pause and say your callsign once, and no, 'break', 'break break', nor 'break break break' are not a special procedure used for emergencies.  Just send your callsign.  Smiley
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K0ZN
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Posts: 1547




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« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2013, 06:41:06 PM »

Hi,

For whatever it is worth, I completely agree with WB2WIK. MANY of the groups on 75 M are at a minimum, "cliqueish" and often just plain unfriendly. You can tell
a lot about those in a QSO if there is inappropriate or even crude language, which, unfortunately is not uncommon on 75 M. Listening to the tone and content of the on going QSO will tell you a lot about the manners and personalities of those involved. You just don't know what kind of response you will get until you try to break in. Typically, just saying your call ONCE is probably the best way to enter a QSO. Listening and waiting for an appropriate pause is most likely to get you into the group with a positive
response. If you are getting bad vibrations from a QSO group, spin the dial and move on. The foregoing does not mean all hams on 75 M are like that but it
is not uncommon behavior.

73,  K0ZN
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KD4LLA
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Posts: 457




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« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2013, 06:49:05 PM »

I wouldn't even begin a QSO on 80m without first talking in person who is already established as a "presence".  Talk about "cliqueish", those diehards on 80m wrote the book, AND made the changes...

Mike
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