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Author Topic: How to work both Korea's  (Read 4789 times)
KY6R
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« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2013, 06:50:25 PM »

I lost 30 lbs this past year - so Velveeta will never be on my diet

I lost 80 pounds last year, so it's not on my diet either.  Neither is Korea - Got 'em both.

73 All,

Don, K2DC


Wow - fantastic achievement. Congrats!
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2013, 07:05:03 PM »

Agreed.  Great job on BOTH accomplishments!
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2013, 07:08:21 PM »

Gene, thanks for your comments.

I always remind my wife that today's youth are providing me job security.  I don't worry much about age discrimination, because the 20-somethings are not willing to work as hard or commit as much or do what it takes to accomplish the goal.  Maybe it's my military training, but when I hear the 20-somethings around me at work always whining about the travel or having to work past 5 PM, I just smile and think "Kid, I am SO happy you are working here.  I may cost more than you in terms of health care $$ and a bit more in salary, but when it comes to measuring output...they're gonna keep me cuz I don't complain and I get the job done without any hassles to management."
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NU1O
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« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2013, 08:16:03 PM »


Oh, SO true, and it runs me up the wall. How can ANYONE not give a damn about what's going on around them?
I am a self-described "Information Junkie", and uninformed people just are NOT going to make it in today's world. They wont make it in next year's world, or the next, or the next............

(sorry for wandering in on your post to Chris. hi)

73, Gene AF3Y

I am also an information junkie.  Not just news, but all types of topics interest me and I love to read.  My mother gets the credit for the reading. She was always at the library and as young kids we tagged along. 

Gene, you are one of the elder statesmen in the forum and one of my favorite members.  You could never intrude.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2013, 08:56:09 PM »

Gene, I second the comments Chris made in his post.  You are not intruding at all.
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NU1O
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« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2013, 10:52:51 PM »


Sorry for the rant, I know adults talked about me like that when I was a kid, but it's different this time.  I think the decrease in youth in our hobby is symptomatic of the problems with our society.  And you are right, Chris...adverts won't help our hobby.  Even if Bar Rafaeli is in front of the rig.

Mark,

The hobby does not need kids as new members, it just needs new members. If I were in charge of trying to recruit new members into the hobby I would see what motivated somebody like Jonathan, W6GX, to enter the hobby.  I think he has been a ham for about 3 years now and is in his early 40's. He has been bitten by the DX bug and has built a very impressive station in a short time. Actually, I can't think of another ham that built a station as competitive as his in as short a period.

On the other side of my town, a policeman for the town in his early 50's has recently become a ham. He is limited to an indoor antenna but just the other day I had a chat with him and he was bragging about how great the hobby is. He's very good with computers, he operates remotely, and he is into the digital modes. I never asked him what motivated him to enter the hobby but I will the next time I speak with him.

About two years ago on some weekend afternoon I was listening to a Grandfather talking to his Grandson. The kid was having problems adjusting his microphone or his amplifier and it was just very painful to listen to. It was obvious to me the kid would rather have been doing just about anything else but fooling with those controls and he probably got his license to please his Grandad. I think that can be a wonderful bond provided the young man is really interested in the hobby and in this case I'm pretty ceratin that was not the case. Eventually, they lost the path and the Grandad said he see him for their regular sked. I have never heard them again and it is a QSO that would really stand out.

I did talk to some kids from the Carey Junior High School in Laramie, Wyoming the past two years and they really sounded like they were having a great time. I sent them my QSL card and they mailed me one back. It was not a report and a thank you QSO. I asked them a bunch of questions about their school and the program. This was on 15 meters and they were working stations from Europe as well so they were getting a Geography lesson and perhaps a History lesson as well. Most of the members were girls if my memory is correct and they were extremely bright kids. Whomever is responsible for that station deserves a lot of credit. I think it was a teacher but I'm not certain. What really surprised me was they were not even HS students yet. Those kids really impressed me so much that I remembered the name of their school. I don't think we need worry about the kids in that school.

I'm not convinced advertising can bring a bunch of recruits into any hobby whether it be chess, stamp collecting, or ham radio, but I would write off most of today's kids and concentrate on bringing adults into the hobby. For a truly gifted school like Carey, I think a ham radio station is great.

I think most people in the DX forum were born with the "curiosity gene".  It's probably why we became interested in science, geography, etc. and then amateur radio.

I ordered "Array of Light" based on all the recommendations and I received it today so I am going to read for about a half hour. 10 meters was open via the long path today so I will see what the band brings in about 7 hours.

73,

Chris/NU1O



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WS3N
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« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2013, 11:13:52 AM »

He has been bitten by the DX bug and has built a very impressive station in a short time. Actually, I can't think of another ham that built a station as competitive as his in as short a period.

Knowing you're a fan of old movies, I was reminded of this.

"Mr. President, the technology required is easily within the means of even the smallest nuclear power. It requires only the vill to do so."
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NU1O
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« Reply #22 on: February 07, 2013, 11:45:16 AM »

He has been bitten by the DX bug and has built a very impressive station in a short time. Actually, I can't think of another ham that built a station as competitive as his in as short a period.

Knowing you're a fan of old movies, I was reminded of this.

"Mr. President, the technology required is easily within the means of even the smallest nuclear power. It requires only the vill to do so."

That has to be Dr. Strangelove.  I'm actually much better with movies from the 30's, 40's and 50's than the 1960's forward.  Turner Classic Movies has only recently started to show a lot of films from the 1960's which is just a not so subtle reminder I am getting old. I liked Peter Sellers in that role but I'm not a fan of his.  My favorite actors were Cary Grant and John Wayne.  Favorite actress was Grace Kelly simply because she was the most beautiful woman I have ever seen and I loved her voice. Director is Hitchcock by a mile.

Yes, Jonathan must have a lot of vill power.   Wink  Let's hope he doesn't start building his own nuclear device. He has been pretty bored of late.  No telling what he is apt to do.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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WS3N
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« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2013, 11:53:39 AM »

A lot of vill power, or maybe the power of hoodoo.  Smiley
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NU1O
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« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2013, 12:32:09 PM »

A lot of vill power, or maybe the power of hoodoo.  Smiley

LMAO!!  I never expected anybody to throw that one back at me in a million years.

Cary Grant, Myrna Loy, and a teenaged Shirley Temple who was terrific in that film. That was written by good old Shidney Sheldon who gave us "I Dearm of Jeannie" along with a bunch of other great work. You are very good and are obviously a fan yourself. Everybody else will think we are nuts but you couldn't have picked a better time. Nothing much exciting is happening on the bands.

Hi-de-ho and top of the world.  Wink

73,

Chris/NU1O

 
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N2RJ
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« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2013, 12:52:05 PM »

We need new members from all walks of life and all ages.

Can't just recruit old people who will die in a few years.

Can't just recruit kids who have no money to buy gear.

Can't just recruit ex CBers or extreme techno geeks.

People with a love for the radio hobby and how it works and its many aspects should always be welcome.

I personally think that the competitive nature of DXing and radiosport is what will effectively attract people who will stay a long time. Competition intrigues people, not colonoscopy nets.
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W6GX
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« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2013, 05:03:41 PM »

If I were in charge of trying to recruit new members into the hobby I would see what motivated somebody like Jonathan, W6GX, to enter the hobby.  I think he has been a ham for about 3 years now and is in his early 40's. He has been bitten by the DX bug and has built a very impressive station in a short time. Actually, I can't think of another ham that built a station as competitive as his in as short a period.

I'm flattered by your nice comments.  I do love DX'ing and I wish more new hams would discover the magic and thrill of DX'ing.

I did get bitten by the DX bug very early on.  In fact DX'ing is what got me interested in ham radio.  I even managed to put up a two-element beam in an HOA community Grin

My dream as a new ham has always been owning a tower and a yagi.  It took a lot of hard work but now I have realized my dream after putting up a tower in Jan. 2012.  The journey has only started and I can hardly wait to see what lies ahead.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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NU1O
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« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2013, 10:55:34 PM »

I'm flattered by your nice comments.  I do love DX'ing and I wish more new hams would discover the magic and thrill of DX'ing.

I did get bitten by the DX bug very early on.  In fact DX'ing is what got me interested in ham radio.  I even managed to put up a two-element beam in an HOA community Grin

My dream as a new ham has always been owning a tower and a yagi.  It took a lot of hard work but now I have realized my dream after putting up a tower in Jan. 2012.  The journey has only started and I can hardly wait to see what lies ahead.

73,
Jonathan W6GX

So, DXing got you interested in ham radio. Talking to far away places was what also motivated me to enter the hobby, but I was a SWL at age 11 or 12 and I spent sometime on 11 meters working DX as a teen. I eventually bought a SW receiver which had a BFO so I listened to plenty of ham QSOs. Ham radio was just a natural progression and I always knew one day I would get a license. As somebody wrote in another post there were a lot of magazines that had SW frequency charts and ham radio ads, and articles on ham radio when I was a kid but aside from CQ and QST they have all closed shop.

One does not just wake up one day in their late 30's and decide it's time to get an amateur radio license, or do they?  I'm curious as to what generated that spark that motivated you to start preparing for the exams.  Where you friends with somebody who had a station?  Were you exposed to ham radio in college?  

Anyway, you are doing a great job and it's been fun watching you work new one's.  Everybody in this forum knows exactly what it's like to break a pileup and work a new country.  Enjoy yourself and don't go build any death rays.  Wink

73,

Chris/NU1O
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 10:59:50 PM by NU1O » Logged
NU1O
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« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2013, 11:45:41 PM »

I personally think that the competitive nature of DXing and radiosport is what will effectively attract people who will stay a long time. Competition intrigues people, not colonoscopy nets.

I agree with almsot everything you wrote. It would be great if a widerange of people were attracted to the hobby from all ages but I believe most hams in the US have a technical background. I speak to a lot of egineers. Outside the US the demographics seem different. In the UK I speak to people from all sorts of jobs and professions.

A ham needs leisure time and it is not an inexpensive hobby. Yeah, somebody can start with a used radio and a dipole but when they find out they are not working the stations the guy with the tower, amp, and beam is working, I think it is a recipe for frustration. A long time an uncle told me I was entering a very expensive hobby and I told him my radio was usd and cost me $500 and my antenna was about $300. It turned out my uncle was right because I was happy with that station for about a year, probably less.  Next came the quad, then the small amp, then the tower and triband beam, finally the K3 and Alpha amp and the bigger beam. I don't have to tell you about costs, you have a tower and SteppIR. We also need to realize the current economic conditions are not very conducive to bringing new hams into the hobby and I'm not singling out any political Party. Real wage growth has been flat for decades.

How do you even make non-hams aware of things like DXCC and contests? The contests have been around forever and so has DXCC but I don't think the contests bring new hams into the hobby. I think those seriously into contests are a fringe group much like DXers. Also, you must be aware that many hams can't stand the contests and they either shut off the rig or QSY to a WARC band.. I usually try to give out a few points in many of the foreign contests but even I get tired of hearing a contest every weekend. I only make a big effort for the really big contests.

73,

Chris/NU1O
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 12:15:34 AM by NU1O » Logged
W6GX
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« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2013, 12:00:40 AM »

One does not just wake up one day in their late 30's and decide it's time to get an amateur radio license, or do they?  I'm curious as to what generated that spark that motivated you to start preparing for the exams.  Where you friends with somebody who had a station?  Were you exposed to ham radio in college?

Back in the 80's as a teen I purchased a novice exam study guide.  At that time my only exposure to ham radio was through Popular Communications (i.e. via pictures and articles).  I never had an Elmer nor did I ever played with a radio, although I did own a scanner and a hand-held CB.  After a few attempts at studying for the exam other interests (metal detecting, coin collecting, astronomy) took over and I never took the exam until 2009.  One of my 'fear' at the time was the radio itself.  I was intimidated by all those knobs on the radio.  I know this sounds very silly but I was only a teenager at the time.  I think an Elmer would have helped to ease my fears.  Fast forward to 2009 when I was 39 years old.  I was talking to a co-worker Jim KO7P and he mentioned to me that he's a ham.  I visited his shack and I was hooked.  I passed the general exam and Jim loaned me a Yaesu FT-840.  I took it home and hooked it up to the rain gutter and I made a contact to Jim AB2CD in GA.  I was thrilled.  Not too long after I purchased a G5RV.  That really opened up my 'reach' and soon I was working JAs and VKs.  I spent the next three months reading up and researching which HF rig. I should get.  Once I made my decision I called up HRO one day and ordered a Yaesu FT-950, a solid-state amplifier, and a high-power antenna tuner.  I knew exactly what I wanted and I didn't take the typical equipment upgrade path that most new hams took.  Back in 2009 the FT-950 was considered 'state-of-the-art' as most of my ham friends were using the FT-897's with no DSP.  Not too long after I was giving presentations on DX'ing and contesting at the local club meetings Grin  BUT to this date I still consider myself a newbie since there's so much to learn about the hobby.  So this is how I got started in ham radio.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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