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Author Topic: Really showing my ignorance here.  (Read 1644 times)
KJ4RQV
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Posts: 130




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« on: February 13, 2013, 10:59:25 AM »

I often see the term "full FB" when someone is talking about a rig and for the life of me I haven't figured out what that is supposed to mean. When I Google the term I get references to Facebook and that doesn't seem to fit.

So, this old dummy load is hoping that one of you will be kind enough to enlighten me on this subject.
Thanks, Don
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20574




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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2013, 11:09:22 AM »

"FB" means "fine business," and is equivalent to "very good" or "I like it," etc.

Never heard "full FB."
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W4HIJ
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Posts: 367




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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2013, 01:15:00 PM »

Yep, never heard the "full" but FB is CW jargon and just general ham jargon. FB OM UR 5NN HR IN GA " Fine business old man, you are five nine nine here in Georgia"
Michael, W4HIJ
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N4KZ
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Posts: 597




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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2013, 01:44:15 PM »

Some ham radio terms trace their origins back to the early 1900s -- when amateur radio was born. Hams used to always call each other "old man" -- on or off the air. It was fashionable among young American men at the time to call each other "old man." It found its way into ham radio and just stuck. Fine business, abbreviated as FB on CW, was much the same. Seventy-three, as in best regards, was an old railroad telegrapher's term that got transferred to ham radio CW operation and it too just stuck.

I don't hear old man used as much on the air as I used to. But nothing seems to have taken its place.

Long calls to answer a station's CQ also have begun to fade from common use. Now, more people just answer a CQ by giving their call one time in reply. I am not a fan of that practice. Invariably, there's noise, static, interference, or several stations calling at once and I have to ask the calling station to repeat his call. Giving it one than once -- like 2 or 3 times -- the first time is much preferred and cuts down on asking for repeats. Besides, if several stations answer a CQ at the same time, the one repeating his call 2 or 3 times will probably be the one who gets heard and thus gets the QSO.

The short one-call routine was born from contesting where minimizing time and maximizing QSOs is desired. But what works well in a contest situation isn't necessarily good operating practice at other times.

And this has happened to me on several occasions -- including just yesterday. I was working a station on SSB and when we signed clear, another station announced his call one time. If he doesn't say who he's calling, neither of us signing were sure which was being called. So one of us had to ask.

Ham radio isn't a telephone. It's one big party-line with lots of fading, static and interference. Giving one's call sign just one time to answer a CQ or call a station really isn't adequate.

Perhaps the old practice of using a so-called 3x3 call is a bit excessive, but giving just once isn't enough either.

For the newcomers, a 3x3 call meant that when I answered your CQ, I said your call sign 3 times and then said "this is" or "from" and repeated my call 3 times. It was used on phone and CW. This practice seems to have faded away and I for one miss it badly.

Thoughts?

73, Dave, N4KZ

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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2013, 02:08:13 PM »

Over in Europe, the term we use, OM, was DR, for Doctor.  You may still encounter that in CW usage from time to time.  I think its Fine Bidness.


73
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W9KDX
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Posts: 770




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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2013, 02:44:10 PM »

...Besides, if several stations answer a CQ at the same time, the one repeating his call 2 or 3 times will probably be the one who gets heard and thus gets the QSO....

Thoughts?

73, Dave, N4KZ



The only thing with this practice is that I would consider this if I was making a casual response to someone I had heard call CQ a few times.  But if I am in a huge pileup trying to get through to a high demand QTH or a DXpedition, I would probably get my rear end handed to me for being rude and thinking I was so Important that I should give my call more than once.  On the other end, I have seen the station ignore the rude callers, especially when two guys go back and forth and back and forth and back and forth making sure they called last.  That can get old real fast.
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Sam
W9KDX
W4HIJ
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Posts: 367




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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2013, 02:47:25 PM »

I surely picked up a lot of what I know and use from habits I have from my late Father.  I will still use the term OM on CW or digital and even say "Old man" on voice occasionally. Another CW term that I use is ES for "and". Anyone remember and use that one?
Michael
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KJ4RQV
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Posts: 130




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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2013, 06:04:26 PM »

Well FB OMs!
Thank you all so much for the help. I just kept drawing a blank on that stuff.
73
Don
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4492




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« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2013, 10:29:32 AM »

W4HIJ,

'es' for 'and'? Of course! Like 'xfmr' for ''transformer', 'Xtal', 'tx', 'trnscvr', 'OM',  etc.

One you rarely hear is 'CL' meaning 'I am closing down'. Using it doesn't stop people calling you though....
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2340




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« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2013, 11:27:23 AM »

I got a laugh recently when one contact replied "I'm not an old man, I'm 27".
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N4KZ
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Posts: 597




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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2013, 11:32:20 AM »

Certainly a long call is not helpful in a DX pile-up. In that scenario, three things will get you through to the DX station -- brute signal strength, timing -- calling when no one else is, or transmitting on a lightly occupied frequency that the DX station is listening to.

Obviously, my comments were directed toward someone answering a casual CQ and not a DX pile-up.

My point being that operating techniques that are well suited for some situations are not suited for others. But not everyone makes that distinction and they probably should.

73, N4KZ
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N4KZ
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Posts: 597




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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2013, 11:34:15 AM »

DR for doctor? Surely you jest. In the world of CW DXing it's short for dear as in Dear OM.

N4KZ
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2013, 12:19:02 PM »

DR for doctor? Surely you jest. In the world of CW DXing it's short for dear as in Dear OM.

N4KZ

I think you'll find that to be something that changed from what it meant originally, a long time ago. 


73
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