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Author Topic: new al 80b not working  (Read 4490 times)
KK3AN
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Posts: 40




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« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2013, 09:29:03 PM »


Quote
While a 10 volt swing or sag is a big deal on 115/120 it as not a big deal on 230/240 as it is merely a 4% change and is not the cause of his problem.

Didn't say it was. I'm backing up KM3F's suggestion that line voltages can have more than 10% variance.

Obviously this isn't immediately noticeable until after a period of time. I have seen nearly a 20% variation within as little as a week's time.

Dan
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W8JX
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Posts: 5336




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« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2013, 10:19:08 PM »


Quote
While a 10 volt swing or sag is a big deal on 115/120 it as not a big deal on 230/240 as it is merely a 4% change and is not the cause of his problem.

Didn't say it was. I'm backing up KM3F's suggestion that line voltages can have more than 10% variance.

Obviously this isn't immediately noticeable until after a period of time. I have seen nearly a 20% variation within as little as a week's time.

Dan

I see a swing of about 6 volts on 240 side (234 to 240) but it is not daily and is slow to change and varies with grid load. It tends to be higher in winter and lower in summer.
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KK3AN
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Posts: 40




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« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2013, 10:30:19 PM »

Grid load does effect it at this QTH. A coal mine is nearby, and the utility co-op has told me this is the culprit. Evidently the coal mine creates the voltage swings and sag.

I've witnessed 40 volts swings - measured on the same meter. It's pretty incredible to see it.

Dan
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N4JTE
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Posts: 1147




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« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2013, 04:46:53 PM »

Update; first of all tnx for all the help.
After phone call with ameritron, rick suggested the relay and sent me a couple of 10 ohm 10 watt resistors.
When I strapped 230 line I neglected to cut the two 120 straps, dumb I know but my screwups might help someone I hope.
Sooo installed radio shack resistor due to ameritron not arriving yet, corrected PS hookup and powered up with cover off.
Lit up and a puff of blue smoke around relay and new resistor, was using a drumstick to defeat the interlock so I jumped and power was cut immediately.
Reset the relay and all is well and performing as specified.
Moral of the story, check your relays and RTFM, hi
Tnx
Bob
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W8JX
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Posts: 5336




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« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2013, 06:33:03 PM »

Lit up and a puff of blue smoke around relay and new resistor, was using a drumstick to defeat the interlock so I jumped and power was cut immediately.

Was it a 10watt or better 20ohm resistor?
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3594




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« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2013, 07:08:29 PM »

FWIW..... prior to building my amp I acquired manuals for several commercial amplifiers so I could perhaps use some of the circuitry in my build.

I wound up with a stack of manuals over 2" thick.

Every one, without exception, simply changes the primary wiring on the power transformer for either 120 or 240V.

Not one requires changing ANY components anywhere in the amp.

JTE:  Glad you got the amp going. 

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RFDOG
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2013, 07:44:42 PM »

Of course its not working.  It's an Ameritron.  Built to a cheap standard by the chief apologist for MFJ.
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W8JX
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2013, 08:12:19 PM »

FWIW..... prior to building my amp I acquired manuals for several commercial amplifiers so I could perhaps use some of the circuitry in my build.

I wound up with a stack of manuals over 2" thick.

Every one, without exception, simply changes the primary wiring on the power transformer for either 120 or 240V.

Not one requires changing ANY components anywhere in the amp.

JTE:  Glad you got the amp going. 



When you throw soft start into it, depending on its design, it can require a resistor change.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2013, 11:00:34 AM »

JX:  Once again, I've never seen this.  Every step-start circuit I've seen uses 120V which available rather the primary is wired for 120 or 240V. 

I simply can't imagine a company requiring their customers to change a resistor in order to operate their equipment.  It's bad enough getting customers to properly change jumpers.

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W8JX
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« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2013, 11:09:08 AM »

JX:  Once again, I've never seen this.  Every step-start circuit I've seen uses 120V which available rather the primary is wired for 120 or 240V.  

I simply can't imagine a company requiring their customers to change a resistor in order to operate their equipment.  It's bad enough getting customers to properly change jumpers.



I agree if it is in parallel with one of the 120v primary windings but results here suggests otherwise.  
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QRP4U2
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Posts: 106




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« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2013, 07:44:05 AM »

JX:  Once again, I've never seen this.  Every step-start circuit I've seen uses 120V which available rather the primary is wired for 120 or 240V. 

I simply can't imagine a company requiring their customers to change a resistor in order to operate their equipment.  It's bad enough getting customers to properly change jumpers.



Take a look at the inrush protection/limiters here.

For 240V, the relay is a 240VAC coil across the 240V line with a single 20ohm 10W resistor.


http://www.ameritron.com/pdffiles/ICP-240.pdf

Phil - AC0OB
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KI5FJ
Member

Posts: 37




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« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2013, 08:15:59 AM »

Glad to know your error in re-configuring the power jumpers did not injure you.
I have been using the AL80-BQ on 240VAC for over 2 years.
Hopefully your experience will be a teachable moment for many !
73
Joe O
NNNN
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