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Author Topic: Yaesu FT101 Digital Freq Display  (Read 2741 times)
KG7AFA
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Posts: 4




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« on: February 19, 2013, 09:08:22 AM »

Hi All
I have a very nice FT 101EE that works flawlessly.  It has the vernier frequency dial and so reading frequency takes a moment.  The biggest problem I have is that when I do read the freq I find it in disagreement with my HAM contacts who are reading our contact freq on digital meters.  Not alot but enough to be annoying. Yaesu made a digital display, YC 601, that plugs into the back of the FT 101 series transceivers. Three questions; how stable is this digital meter, where does it get its signal for display and would I be better off with a digital Sangean 909 receiver that has SSB 40HZ resolution on top of a 1KHZ main dial resolution for determining my transmit frequency digitally?  The costs are about the same for either item.  Thanks in advance for any insight.

Ron 
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AD4U
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Posts: 2150




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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 10:17:35 AM »

Yaesu made two models of this digital display.  The earlier one had red LEDs and the later one had green LEDs.  Internally where was little if any difference. 

As I remember the display required 3 (?) signals provided by the FT-101 transceiver.  The signal jacks are already on the rear panel of most (if not all) of the transceivers.  I have a FT-101E in my boatanchor collection that has the required jacks on the rear panel.  I am not sure if the earlier transceivers in the FT-101 series had them or not.

In order to connect the digital display all you do is connect the three cables to the corresponding phono jacks on the rear of the transceiver.  Small coax with phono plugs on each end will do nicely.

My FT-101E and every one I have worked on for other hams, had a very accurate VFO readout.  When you change from USB to LSB you have to recalibrate the main dial via the internal crystal calibrator.  Ditto when you change bands.  Are you doing this?


Dick  AD4U
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KG7AFA
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 10:49:18 AM »

Hi

Yes I am but using the 100 and 25 khs signals seems a bit crude as I am not clear where exactly to pick in the audio signal.  Using the S meter does help some but not terribly accurate.  This is really more of a niceness issue than anything else.  Ia transmitting accurately on the receive freq according to contact reports.

Thanks
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AD4U
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Posts: 2150




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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 11:45:11 AM »

Maybe I confused my reply above with how to hook up a Heathkit SB-650 digital display to a SB-102 transceiver.  I posted from memory.  I am not in my shop and I do not have a FT-101E to look at.

I indicated that there were "phono jacks" on the rear of the FT-101E where one connects the FC-601 digital display.  There MAY indeed be phono jacks on SOME later FT-101E rigs, however in earlier rigs the signals appear at an 8 or 9 pin round jack on the rear panel.

Either way you will need a cable with the proper "ends" to connect the YC-601 to the FT-101 series of transceivers.  In all FT-101 rigs I have seen, the necessary outputs to drive the YC-601 appear at some place on the rear of the rig (phono jacks or 8-9 pin round jack). 

All you have to do is to make or find the proper cable to connect the two devices together.

Dick  AD4U
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AC5UP
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Posts: 3812




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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2013, 04:49:44 PM »

This is one of those judgement call questions... 

On one hand, the radio is old enough that putting any serious money into accessories is probably not a good idea. At any moment the radio could smoke an expensive part and then you have a fully optioned doorstop. OTOH, there can be the occasional opportunity to snarf up a cheap parts rig so it might not take much cash to keep it going - if - you're willing to learn the art and science of preserving the UJHAT... Universal Japanese Hybrid Amateur Transceiver.

In this case, a factory digidial for an FT-101E is probably a rare bird considering how few sold back in the day. Lots of people wanted them, but they were expensive and when it came to spending the coin... Not so much. There's also the Charlie Brown effect to consider. FT-101's fetch more than what I think they're worth on zBay and I've seen the same at local Hamfests 'cuz the skip shootin' big signal Freeband operators will pay a premium for them.

Woo-Hoo.  That means the rest of us do too.

Note To KG7AFA:  Back in the day Ham folks learned how to use the crystal calibrator to stay within the band edges and didn't worry too much about being exactly on 14.280.0000000000000 MC's. But somehow they managed to work the world. Collected thousands of QSL cards. Make the DXCC Honor Roll.

No kidding... They really did, and you can too, even with an analogue dial.........!

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G3RZP
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Posts: 4301




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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 03:35:38 AM »

When using the 100 or 25 KHz signals from the calibrator, you should tune to zero beat on whichever sideband you want to use, and then adjust the dial accordingly.
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AL7MM
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Posts: 42




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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2013, 11:31:04 AM »

My YC-601 connects to my FT-101E with a single cable at the accessory outlet - probably a custom wiring job. Anyway, I zero beat the VFO against the calibrator every time I change bands, and then adjust the YC-601 to reflect the same value as the dial. It may not be digital perfect, but it works for CW and SSB!
73,
Mike, KL7MJ
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