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Author Topic: S01MZ active  (Read 2963 times)
NU1O
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Posts: 2749




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« on: February 20, 2013, 10:43:35 AM »

I think S01MZ is a resident amateur from Western Sahara but I have not heard him before. He is currently on 20 meters with a strong signal -14.297 - and with the huge pileup you'd expect for a S0 station.  I broke through a few minutes ago. He is primarily working ECUSA and Western Europe.

He is working simplex so be prepared for some fun.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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W6GX
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2013, 11:53:23 AM »

I heard him too but I decided not to jump into the fray with all those CB'ers.  Plus he's not that strong here in CO so my chances are pretty much nil.  Can you imagine S01 on SSB running simplex?  I did work him recently on 15m and only god knows how he came back to me Grin

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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NU1O
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 01:04:54 PM »

I heard him too but I decided not to jump into the fray with all those CB'ers.  Plus he's not that strong here in CO so my chances are pretty much nil.  Can you imagine S01 on SSB running simplex?  I did work him recently on 15m and only god knows how he came back to me Grin

73,
Jonathan W6GX

I think Martii Laine invented the phrase, "The ham running the pileup is responsible for the way the pileup behaves."  Or words which maybe similar. Although the S0 station had a decent signal here the boys from 4 and 5 land were 30 dB stronger and I know they had the same problem with signals from my area.  It was extremely hard to hear who S01MZ went back to. Also, he had signals coming at him from the US, Europe, and South Africa. I think most people talking over him simply couldn't hear him. I did not hear any jamming or tuning up while I was listening.

The $64K qustion is why he wasn't running split.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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AF3Y
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Posts: 3849




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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 01:54:11 PM »

I have not heard the pileup, and dont need W.Sahara, but I DO wonder why a number 109 ranking on the clublog want list would command such a pile up as you describe.

I know I continue to poo poo these African stations, but I guess its cause I worked most of them already. AND HEY.......... I am a much newer DXer than many of you.  Yep, I need E3 and a few of the French islands.  I do have Glorioso tho........

BTW....... I ALSO have Monk Apollo confirmed on SSB and CW.. heh heh heh Cool shamless brag.

GL To all needing W. Sahara...

73, Gene AF3Y
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HS0ZIB
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Posts: 434




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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2013, 04:48:24 PM »

Quote
The $64K qustion is why he wasn't running split.

Perhaps his rig doesn't offer split operation?  Perhaps he cannot afford a flashy, split-operation rig? Many people, (myself included), prefer to construct their own simple rigs.  If I ever get my XZ licence, then I too will be operating simplex!

Simon
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 04:53:42 PM »

Simon, PLEASE tell me you are not going to operate simplex.  That will be a zoo of unparalleled proportions, and it will frustrate you to the point of shutting down your rig.  What can we do to help?  Do you need a YASME or NCDXCC donation or a loaner rig for receive? 
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WD4ELG
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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2013, 04:55:14 PM »

Chris, nice job.  It was total chaos on the frequency, I wanted a bandfill but not bad enough to fight that pandemonium.  The op was doing a good job running the stations, but he cannot control poor operators who cannot hear him or refuse to behave in a reasonable fashion.
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WA2VUY
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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2013, 06:36:03 PM »

S01MZ was active at least back to 1993.

The other "locals" were (are) S01A and S01AB.
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AF5C
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« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2013, 07:22:05 PM »

Glad I have S0 confirmed on 20 SSB, as well as 20 PSK and 30m CW (shameless plug for myself).  There haven't been any recent DXpeditions to Western Sahara that I know of.  All the stuff I worked was 2003 or before.  Any ideas why the lack of recent DXpeditions?

John AF5CC
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NU1O
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« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2013, 09:07:01 PM »

Chris, nice job.  It was total chaos on the frequency, I wanted a bandfill but not bad enough to fight that pandemonium.  The op was doing a good job running the stations, but he cannot control poor operators who cannot hear him or refuse to behave in a reasonable fashion.

Mark,

I broke the pileup with only 3 or 4 calls and he went QRT right after I wrote the message in this forum so I can only report on what I heard during a 5 to 10 minute period. I was a CBer in my teens so although  I'm not 100% sure what Jonathan meant by "all those CBers", I do know what the CB bands sounded like back in the 1970's and early 80's. Generally, when one talks about CB-type behavior I assume they mean foul language, reverb effects, beeps at the end of a transmission, people throwing carriers, and all that colorful language you hear in a movie like "Smokey and the Bandit" that hams can't stand.

I did not hear any of the behavior I described above while I was listening to S01MZ.  I heard S01MZ at 10 dB over S9. He was stronger than the European stations on frequency because I had my beam slightly south of him at 100 degrees so it had a neglible effect on his signal but my beam was far enough off Western Europe to have attenuated those stations to signal strengths lower than his.

My biggest problem was from several stations down South who were at least 30 over S9 here but they were simply throwing their calls into the pileup and listening for a reply which was what I was doing. They were well mannered, just very strong.

The stations in the US that worked him - most of whom were up and down the East coast - before me had a strong enough copy on him to be able to copy him over the European stations and they made fast QSOs.  When he called me the guys in 4 and 5 land had stopped calling so he was in the clear. I talked over the Europeans and the QSO was done in a few seconds. Since I always give my complete call the S0 came back to my full call and I did not have to repeat anything.  It was a very easy QSO for me but I was running 1500 watts to the Skyhawk and that beam has a lot of side rejection. If I had heard the Europeans stronger than S01MZ I would not have entered the pileup.

HS0ZIB  wrote, "Perhaps he cannot afford a flashy, split-operation rig?"  My current rig is a K3 but my backup rigs are an Icom 735 and an Icom 720A. Those rigs date back to 1985 and 1980 and they both have split frequency capability.  I'm pretty sure both rigs can be bought for under $500, and I've seen the 720A priced at $350. Those are NOT splashy or expensive rigs!

Mark, I was in and out of the pileup real quick and I heard a station from your state work him very quickly. Did you actually hear CB behavior with the swearing and jamming, or did you hear many stations transmitting on the same frequency with the DX station often covered up? There is a world of difference.

73,

Chris/NU1O

« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 09:46:37 PM by NU1O » Logged
W6GX
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Posts: 3003




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« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2013, 09:18:35 PM »

Hi Chris,

What I meant by CB'ers are those people who don't follow the DX code of conduct.  This means calling over a QSO.  The pile up is larger than you realize because the strong signal from S01 masked the hoards of people calling right on top of your QSO.  From my end the pile up never abated even when S01 was transmitting.  If you were in my shoes you wouldn't jump into it either, no matter what antenna/amplifier you have.  One simply couldn't make a contact when the DX station is S5 and the callers are 20 over S9 on a simplex frequency; you would never hear your call even if he comes back to you.  When I made my 15m contact with him he was also S5.  The only difference was that I couldn't hear most of the pile up, either because there were only a few callers or I was on the back side of the callers' beam.  This allowed me with a opportunity to hear my call without much QRM.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 09:39:49 PM by KF7BBJ » Logged
NU1O
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Posts: 2749




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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2013, 09:25:48 PM »


Perhaps his rig doesn't offer split operation?  Perhaps he cannot afford a flashy, split-operation rig? Many people, (myself included), prefer to construct their own simple rigs.  If I ever get my XZ licence, then I too will be operating simplex!

Simon

If that is not a joke, I hope you never get a license to operate from Burma because everybody from my part of the country, and from many other parts of the globe, can forget about getting through. You may as well just state you are only going to work Chinese and Japanese stations 24/7 because  for the most part you will only be working Asian stations and some big guns from the West coast of the US.

Martii Laine has probably operated from more countries than anybody over the past 50 years and when he says the operator has to take responsibility for the pileup, I take him at his word.

Just about everyday I see guys who know how to work a pileup and those who don't. The operators who can't control a mob just cause chaos, aggravation and a lot of frustration.

Simon, if you get a license from Burma it will be a zoo if you operate split. If you ever operated simplex the QSO rate would drop to such low levels that on-air riots will break out. Why would you want to do that?

73,

Chris/NU1O

« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 09:50:20 PM by NU1O » Logged
NU1O
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Posts: 2749




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« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2013, 09:35:03 PM »

Hi Chris,

What I meant by CB'ers are those people who don't follow the DX code of conduct.  This means calling over a QSO.  The pile up is larger than you realize because the strong signal from S01 masked the hoards of people calling right on top of your QSO.  From my end the pile up never abated even when S01 was transmitting.  If you were in my shoes you wouldn't jump into it either, no matter what antenna/amplifier you have.  One simply couldn't make a contact when the DX station is S5 and the callers are 20 over S9 on a simplex frequency; you would never hear your call even if he comes back to you.  When I made my 15m contact with him his was also S5.  The only difference was that I couldn't hear most of the pile up, either because there were only a few callers or I was on the back side of the beam.  This allowed me with a opportunity to hear my call without much QRM.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
Hi Jonathan,

I am glad you chimed in.

Who caused the problem?  Why shouldn't the Europeans call a DX station when he is strong at their location.  Some of us on the East Coast could null out Europe and our only problem was each other but while I was on everbody I heard in the US was simply throwing their call in once or twice and listening. From my vantage point it sounded like a pileup in the 80 meter DX window where they often work simplex.

You are not descrbing CB behavior. You are describing what always happens when a rare DX station works simplex.

73,

Chris/NU1O

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W6GX
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Posts: 3003




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« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2013, 09:47:45 PM »

Hi Chris,

What I meant by CB'ers are those people who don't follow the DX code of conduct.  This means calling over a QSO.  The pile up is larger than you realize because the strong signal from S01 masked the hoards of people calling right on top of your QSO.  From my end the pile up never abated even when S01 was transmitting.  If you were in my shoes you wouldn't jump into it either, no matter what antenna/amplifier you have.  One simply couldn't make a contact when the DX station is S5 and the callers are 20 over S9 on a simplex frequency; you would never hear your call even if he comes back to you.  When I made my 15m contact with him his was also S5.  The only difference was that I couldn't hear most of the pile up, either because there were only a few callers or I was on the back side of the beam.  This allowed me with a opportunity to hear my call without much QRM.

73,
Jonathan W6GX

Hi Chris,

I couldn't hear the EU pile up.  All I could hear was the East Coast wall with 20 over S9 signals.

When I work Africa I never hear the EU pile up.  Remember I'm in Colorado so we have vastly different propagation to different parts of the world.  I guess it's rare for me, the East Coast, and the EU all have propagation to Africa on the same frequency at the same time.  Perhaps this is more of an exception rather than the rule; it didn't matter anyway since I couldn't hear the EU pile up.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
Hi Jonathan,

I am glad you chimed in.

Who caused the problem?  Why shouldn't the Europeans call a DX station when he is strong at their location.  Some of us on the East Coast could null out Europe and our only problem was each other but while I was on everbody I heard in the US was simply throwing their call in once or twice and listening. From my vantage point it sounded like a pileup in the 80 meter DX window where they often work simplex.

You are not descrbing CB behavior. You are describing what always happens when a rare DX station works simplex.

73,

Chris/NU1O


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NU1O
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Posts: 2749




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« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2013, 10:36:53 PM »

Hi Chris,

I couldn't hear the EU pile up.  All I could hear was the East Coast wall with 20 over S9 signals.

When I work Africa I never hear the EU pile up.  Remember I'm in Colorado so we have vastly different propagation to different parts of the world.  I guess it's rare for me, the East Coast, and the EU all have propagation to Africa on the same frequency at the same time.  Perhaps this is more of an exception rather than the rule; it didn't matter anyway since I couldn't hear the EU pile up.

73,
Jonathan W6GX

Jonathan,

As I previously wrote, if the Europeans were stronger than the DX station I would not have entered the pileup. I knew I could work him based on his signal strength and hearing other 1 area stations work him easily. Like The Gambler says, "You have to know when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em."  I had a playable hand from my location.

Assuming S01MZ couldn't operate split which I am not prepared to assume since even rigs built within the past 40 years have the ability, I don't understand why he didn't narrow the pileup down. He could've asked for Europeans only or US only. You may not want to say it but I will: the mess was created by the guy running the pileup.

What do you think will happen if Simon really operates simplex from Burma?  Nevermind us stations on the East Coast who wouldn't have a snowball's chance in hell to work him, do you think you could work Burma simplex from Colorado when the Japanese, Chinese and Indonesian stations are just a sand wedge away?

The DX code of Conduct also includes the following:

I will respect my fellow hams and conduct myself so as to earn their respect.

Does a ham who refuses to operate split from a rare DX entity earn his colleagues respect if the result is chaos, frustration, and a lot of agita?

73,

Chris/NU1O



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