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Author Topic: 10 gauge vs 14 gauge for 160 dipole for added bandwidth  (Read 1780 times)
KB3FFH
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Posts: 182




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« on: December 22, 2014, 10:25:57 AM »

Is there any difference between a 10 gauge and 14 gauge wire for added bandwidth at 160 meters. Thanks
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 14186




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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2014, 10:44:56 AM »

Not that you will notice.
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SWMAN
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Posts: 653




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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2014, 03:42:33 PM »

The biggest difference that you will see is the weight of the wires. Number 10 is about 3 times as heavy as 14. I would never use 10 just because of the weight and especially for the length need for 160.  73 Jim W5JJG.   MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU
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WX7G
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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2014, 05:31:23 PM »

An EZNEC simulation of a 160 meter dipole 70' above average ground, for bare wire, shows these 2:1 VSWR bandwidths:

#10, 67 kHz
#14, 63 kHz
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NV2A
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Posts: 174




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« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2014, 06:16:40 PM »

This is a considerable factor at UHF and VHF but not nearly as significant on HF.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2014, 06:49:07 PM »

Quote from: WX7G
An EZNEC simulation of a 160 meter dipole 70' above average ground, for bare wire, shows these 2:1 VSWR bandwidths:

#10, 67 kHz
#14, 63 kHz


And about a 3.5 kHz shift in resonant frequency due to the wire diameter.  (Higher frequency for
smaller wire.)

By the time you string a 160m dipole across a typical property, the variation due to other
factors will be more important.

At VHF/UHF the diameter in wavelengths is much larger, especially when using rods or tubing
rather than wire.  That's why you see more variation due to conductor diameter.
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N8XI
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2014, 06:52:18 AM »

For bandwidth on 80 and 160 Meters you need to use at least #6 or maybe even 2/0.
But, unless you have really sturdy, beefed-up supports it will sag  Grin

Seriously, check out folded-dipoles.
You could use 300 ohm or 450 ohm twin-lead.
The other method would be to build a cage antenna.

In any case you would need an antenna tuner.

GL and 73
Rick - N8XI
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WX7G
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Posts: 6458




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« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2014, 07:06:19 AM »

Let's make a 2-wire cage dipole. Each dipole has has two #14 wires spaced 12 inches. The 2:1 VSWR bandwidth is 89 kHz.

Now let's make a 4-wire cage dipole with the wires forming a square 12 inches on a side. The 2:1 VSWR bandwidth is 112 kHz.

« Last Edit: December 24, 2014, 07:12:07 AM by WX7G » Logged
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