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Author Topic: So what is it about CW?  (Read 2193 times)
WB2ERJ
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« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2003, 02:11:08 PM »

It is tough to find a non-rubber stamp qso sometimes.  I suspect some people have to reduce speed a lot to actually converse, so they don't bother.  I always try to go a little further and seek out chirpy and unstable sigs; they are invariably running vintage or HB rigs and love to talk about it!
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WD0CPI
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« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2003, 09:54:38 PM »

I so love to see a topic like this... about hamming in general but about CW specifically. Fantastic.

CW is what attracted me to amateur radio back in '75. I was a CB'er before and during the big CB fad era. Radio always intrigued me, but i fell deeply in love from the very first didah i ever laid ears on. And that happened on my dad's Zenith TransOceanic SW receiver. Wow, what a world that radio opened up to me. It was on it that i first heard the faint didahdidahs... what is this?? Someone sending... code? Some guy "out there" is sending code and someone else knows how to read it! I can't begin to tell you what a fascinating air of mystery this held for me. The mystique involved with sending and receiving this "code" on radio compelled me, drove me, to find out everything i could about it.

Within a year of that fateful night i had my novice class license and was on my way. I was danged proud, i'll tell you. My dad was pretty proud, too... he took me to the city and bought me a brand spanking new Kenwood TS-520. What a total dream-world that day was. I was walking 10 feet off the ground for many months after that. I'll never forgot it. I've loved CW just as much over the years, despite a farily long hiatus from hamming (sometimes life gets in the way Smiley

So for me, even to this day, radio in general and CW in particular still holds that certain aura of mystery. Nothing quite does it for me like hearing that faint, distant CQ, that weak, chirpy squawk of an ancient rig, or the unmistakable rhythm of a bug... it's CODE... guys out there on the airwaves sending and receiving CODE!

What a thrill and endless source of joy. And yes, those who scorn CW and strive to see its end are missing something so very special, so very satisfying, and something for me that is the very heart and soul of amateur radio.

Scott
WD0CPI
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N9PI
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2003, 11:30:00 PM »

I would agree, Shin... such a long time since I have had a long CW ragchew... maybe because I have not heard JA1NUT for a while!  Wink  
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N9PI
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« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2003, 11:31:07 PM »

I would agree, Shin... such a long time since I have had a long CW ragchew... maybe because I have not heard JA1NUT for a while!  Wink  
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N9PI
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« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2003, 11:32:32 PM »

I would agree, Shin... such a long time since I have had a long CW ragchew... maybe because I have not heard JA1NUT for a while!  Wink  
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W3JGG
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« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2003, 08:10:29 PM »

I too was introduced to amateur radio by my great-grandfather's Zenith TransO.  However as a new licensee, I was sucked into the 2m FM trap.  I did make a brief attempt to learn code, but at an ARRL/VEC examining session was sent home for actually writing the dits and dahs (age 16.)  Six years later I relearned the code and passed the slow 5wpm exam.  I now work CW exclusively- I have found more pleasure and relaxation using this mode than phone, plus I love exchanging QSLs; CW ops are more apt to trade cards than phone ops.  
By the way, the active chapter of the International Morse Preservation Society, or FISTS is great club for CW lovers young and old alike.  My # is 9980, I always monitor 14.058 mHz.  73
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WA2OAX
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« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2008, 09:54:45 AM »

To JA1NUT;

Hello Shin,

I have been trying to contact you.  My wife and I will
be in Japan next week.  Perhaps we can have dinner
and discuss cw and medicine !

Ira  WA2OAX  (wa2oax@toast.net)
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W6YDE
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2009, 07:51:24 AM »

I just QSOed w/ JA1NUT at a healthly 30WPM on 40m... Yes he wants to ask ?s and hear abt yur station. We talked abt a QSO when I was QRP one day and then asked abt the antennas used at each location.  Very interresting person to QSO w/. His english is very good and the turn around time between transmissions is instantaneous... I like that! There is no time to be waiting for the other station to draw lines between words in his cpy.
de Mike/W6YDE
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N2EY
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Posts: 3879




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« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2009, 04:52:36 PM »

The thing about CW is that it's unique.

Think about all the modes of electronic communication we have for exchanging verbal information.

Almost all of them fall into two classes:

The first class is voice modes. Somebody talks, somebody else listens. Might be real-time, might be recorded, might be hi-fi, might be "communications quality", might even be singing. But it's a human voice, and it's aural.

The second class is text modes. Could be written, printed, typed, etc. RTTY, packet, IM, the screen you're looking at to read this, etc. Whatever it is, it's text-based, and it's visual.

Then there's Morse Code. It's text-based, but it's aural, not visual (at least not usually). It's not like anything else. Almost everyone can learn how to do it, but it does require learning that's not taught in most homes or schools.

IOW, it's completely different, unique, and skill-based. That's its appeal. That's what sells it.

----

The thing about closing your eyes or turning off the lights when having a CW QSO is that it helps shut out distraction. It's the same principle that causes a driver to turn off the radio and shush passengers when driving gets tricky or they're lost. Less distracting sensory input helps concentration on the important stuff.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2009, 02:41:48 PM »

This may well be the best thread I've ever seen on a Ham Radio message board.  There is an emotional connection to CW for me, like music.  I've played guitar for 40 years, and many I've talked to say that musical ability is a blessing for a CW op.  My Mom sang a bit in the Grand Ole Opry, and I've played music at high levels, and I got the ability from her.  I guess I ought to thank her for my CW abilities, also, hihi.  When I get on phone, I just want to flip the switch back to CW, can't help it.  Some of us are just lucky, I guess.  Any labor of love is truly sweet work, and not like real work at all.  Cheers to all.    n5
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K8DJW
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2009, 09:16:54 AM »

Another musician/CW operator here... I totally agree. I am a banjo player, and I work banjo rolls in my head almost exactly the way I "practice" CW in my head.
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VK5DO
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Posts: 90




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« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2009, 02:03:42 PM »

I'm only just getting into amateur radio and CW is the ONLY reason I'm pursueing the hobby.  I will obviously have phone mode cababilities but I don't see myself using them too much with CW being the main reason for my interest in this new (to me) hobby.

What appeals to me is that there's a degree of skill and brain power utilised when ising the code properly.

The other thing is, even when I was into CB as a kid, I didn't like anyone in the house overhearing my conversations and that really hasn't changed.  With CW I wont have to explain "what or why". It's all just beeps to someone else.

Friends have asked what's the relevance of a mode like this in a time when I've got a gadget in my pocket at all times with which I can call the other side of the world.  True, I can do that with my cell phone but there's no challenge in that and that's not the point of CW or amateur radio in general anyway.

As I said, I'm only starting out at this but I've been practicing receiving and sending for at least an hour a day (up to three) for the last 2 months.  I'm starting to get there now (12WPM) and I'm determined to be good (25WPM) at this.  

I cant remember being "driven" like this about a hobby since was a kid.

Cheers,

Dene
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KA3DNR
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Posts: 74




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« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2009, 10:32:05 PM »

Fantastic post Dene!

Welcome to the world of CW.

I love it too...

I enjoy working the CW ops so much...

Ah heck, you've made me now get all excited to have a CW QSO...I am going to run over to the rig and have a nice CW chat!

Regards,

Marc, KA3DNR
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VK4TJF
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Posts: 93




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« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2009, 04:08:49 AM »

currently I'm a top band man, I like 20 meters, in this low sunspot activity it is darn hard to get many DX contacts out there, especially since I'm going for WAS with only 10 to go. I used to overdrive my radio a bit with phone yelling into the MIC, trying in vein to get these loud European stations to hear me. then my dad K8UP and my good friend George VK4XY told me secret to many of their DX contacts... shhh CW, don't tell any one. I found it a real joy the other week to work a guy in Alabama who I could hardly hear, but after a few filters and a good ear I worked him, another QSL to have my dad K8UP send off so I can get the WAS award.
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N9GXA
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Posts: 119




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« Reply #29 on: September 10, 2009, 11:09:50 AM »

"...then my dad K8UP and my good friend George VK4XY told me secret to many of their DX contacts... shhh CW, don't tell any one."

  Oh great - ...and what did you go do?

;-)
73 - Paul - N9GXA
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