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Author Topic: Your favorite DXing technique/tip?  (Read 4200 times)
NU1O
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Posts: 2692




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« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2013, 07:58:43 AM »

Oh man, I feel terrible.. I did this by accident on top of the clipperton dxpedition last night along with transmitting my call! As a first time father with a less than three week old newborn I am finding out that sleep deprivation and radio don't mix too well. I received several emails.. Some friendly and some not so friendly late last night. My apologies to all! I definitely do know better not to ever do that.

It happens to all of us on occasion so don't let it worry you.  I don't think it requires an email.  Most people figure out on there own in a few calls.

73,

Chris/NU1O
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N3QVB
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Posts: 81




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« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2013, 09:29:43 AM »

As others have mentioned, listen first for patterns regardless of whether DX is working simplex or split. 

1.  Try tailing in just before you think the op will return (just once and with your full call).  Listen for that ebb and flow to the rhythm.
2.  If split, pick a frequency and stay there.  I know many try to find a pattern of where the DX listens and they jump around based on that.  It works but the time it takes to find that pattern (if there is one), you could have bagged him/her already.  For me, staying put works.  Your mileage may vary.
3.  If you're running barefoot without a beam, you'll have to be surgical and creative as you may not be able to muscle your way in.  See Tip #1.

Oh, and before I forget; as Steve WB2WIK recently pointed out, get yourself a rig that says "you're still working split, dummy!".  Nothing worse when you don't turn off that split button.   
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W6GX
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Posts: 2798




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« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2013, 09:47:39 AM »

One of the biggest issue I see nowadays is finding the DX's listening frequency.  With so many people calling all the time I simply don't use my VFO B anymore.  My panadaptor and VFO B are pretty much useless.  I don't know how you guys do it but I can't seem to find the RX frequency let alone the 'rhythm' of the pile Cheesy

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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K0YQ
Member

Posts: 458




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« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2013, 10:04:09 AM »


Oh man, I feel terrible.. I did this by accident on top of the clipperton dxpedition last night along with transmitting my call! As a first time father with a less than three week old newborn I am finding out that sleep deprivation and radio don't mix too well. I received several emails.. Some friendly and some not so friendly late last night. My apologies to all! I definitely do know better not to ever do that.

Congrats on the new arrival!  Those sleep deprived nights can sometimes be advantageous as the pileups really thin out at 3:00AM.  Tip - change the diaper BEFORE getting on the rig.  That usually cleared any fog completely out of my head.

Good luck.
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W6GX
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Posts: 2798




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« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2013, 10:08:12 AM »


Oh man, I feel terrible.. I did this by accident on top of the clipperton dxpedition last night along with transmitting my call! As a first time father with a less than three week old newborn I am finding out that sleep deprivation and radio don't mix too well. I received several emails.. Some friendly and some not so friendly late last night. My apologies to all! I definitely do know better not to ever do that.

Congrats on the new arrival!  Those sleep deprived nights can sometimes be advantageous as the pileups really thin out at 3:00AM.  Tip - change the diaper BEFORE getting on the rig.  That usually cleared any fog completely out of my head.

Good luck.

I had never thought that there would be a common thread between ham radio and dirty diapers.  I guess I'm wrong on that one Cheesy

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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NU4B
Member

Posts: 2287




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« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2013, 11:53:43 AM »

Quote
1.  Try tailing in just before you think the op will return (just once and with your full call).

Tailing has turned into never stop calling and calling on top of other's QSO's in order to be the first one tailing.
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NU1O
Member

Posts: 2692




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« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2013, 12:25:22 PM »

One of the biggest issue I see nowadays is finding the DX's listening frequency.  With so many people calling all the time I simply don't use my VFO B anymore.  My panadaptor and VFO B are pretty much useless.  I don't know how you guys do it but I can't seem to find the RX frequency let alone the 'rhythm' of the pile Cheesy

73,
Jonathan W6GX

I just called it quits on 15 for that exact reason.  The pileup is so large that it the panadapter is totally useless. I did hear two stations he went back to so I zero-beated them but there were either stronger stations on top of me, or he is moving after every QSO.  That is why I am on this site and looking for interesting stuff on other bands.  Like I wrote the other day, sometimes you need to know when to fold 'em if you're holding a crummy hand.

I just do not have the patience to transmit my call for an hour or more straight especially when I have worked an ATNO on one band.  I'm not looking for 3400 bandfills and all modes.

73,

Chris/NU1O



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W6GX
Member

Posts: 2798




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« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2013, 01:09:40 PM »

Quote
1.  Try tailing in just before you think the op will return (just once and with your full call).

Tailing has turned into never stop calling and calling on top of other's QSO's in order to be the first one tailing.

LOL.  That was a good one.  This is especially true when the DX is working via simplex.  Sometimes you have to use reverse psychology- make your call right after the QRZ as EVERYONE is trying to tail end everybody else Cheesy  I have seen a moment of silence right after the QRZ.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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N8FNR
Member

Posts: 149




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« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2013, 02:08:32 PM »

Don't get wrong on this. I bet everyone with an amp has done this by accident. However I am referring to those who tune up for a LONG time and then call CQ right on top of the DX when he is working split. Just watched a guy tune up for several minutes on top of TX5K on 15M.


And guess what, my favorite tip is NOT to tune up on the DX when he is working split!



Zack
N8FNR

Oh man, I feel terrible.. I did this by accident on top of the clipperton dxpedition last night along with transmitting my call! As a first time father with a less than three week old newborn I am finding out that sleep deprivation and radio don't mix too well. I received several emails.. Some friendly and some not so friendly late last night. My apologies to all! I definitely do know better not to ever do that.
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KD4GIE
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #24 on: March 03, 2013, 04:28:17 PM »

Another great tip...if the DX is operating CW, RTTY, or PSK...don't become a neighbor and start calling CQ CQ within a few Hz of the call frequency.  Give them plenty of room.  Same goes for tuning or using a pecker a few Hz away...even with tightening the notch filtering, a S9+ tone a few hertz away can leave the considerate operator wondering if the DX confirmed his or her callsign. 
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WD4ELG
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2013, 06:23:36 PM »

Agree Chris.  If it is ATNO, that is one thing.  But an hour of guessing where the op will listen, for just a bandfill...pass on that.  Now if the op has a pattern I can detect, or he is moving in a certain direction, then I will give it a shot.  But a random roll of the dice is just not in the cards for me.  XYL has too many "honey do" items as the weather gets nicer, that I can't afford to put off.
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WD4ELG
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #26 on: March 03, 2013, 06:33:39 PM »

These tips are from my elmers (W4RZ, SK), (N1LN, Bruce) and (KZ1X, Steve).  Too many to share just one.  I will limit it to five that hopefully are relevant but less common.

TIP #1: On SSB, tune/optimize your audio for cleanliness and punch without overdriving it.  I learned this with the Flex.  Mixers after the microphone can be done for older style rigs.  It really makes a difference.

TIP #2: On CW, get a memory keyer (I have a K5).  WAY more efficient to hit a button 100 times in a big pileup than to send your callsign x 100.  And it sounds cleaner, it will get the DX op attention.

TIP #3: Find a way to get on all bands on all modes.  Several of my ATNO came on 30 meter PSK and 12 M RTTY, and I never got them on another band or mode.  Other DX came on WARC bands only (17 meters only for A5A).  If I did not have that capability of all bands, I never would have snagged the DX.

TIP #4: When everyone is chasing the really rare DX in the pileup, tune around and see what everyone else is missing (got VK0IR this way during Malpelo).

TIP #5, CONTESTS: get active during every DX contest (ARRL, CQ DX, CQ WPX, IARU) and every mode (CW, SSB, RTTY).  And get on when foreign DX contests are on (All Asia, Russian DX, etc.)  Also, during SSB contests be sure to check out the CW DX that is on which nobody is chasing at that time.  And during all contests, head over to the WARC bands to work DX that does NOT want to be in the contest.
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4801




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« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2013, 07:38:18 PM »

My technique is to come here and get tips from experts. LOL
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AF5CC
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Posts: 941




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« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2013, 08:26:32 PM »

Congrats on the new arrival!  Those sleep deprived nights can sometimes be advantageous as the pileups really thin out at 3:00AM. 

How do you think I bagged Johnston Is. on 80m back in 2003?  My several month old daughter (at that time) woke up crying and it was my turn to get her back to sleep.  Well, heck, now that I am up, might as well check the bands, and there they were. 

Worked Wake Is. back in 2002 when I had to get up to answer nature's call in the middle of the night. 

John AF5CC
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AA6YQ
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Posts: 1751


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« Reply #29 on: March 04, 2013, 02:56:52 AM »

My favorite DXing tip is to use DXLab:
  • - you'll know when and where to look for the DX stations you need before they're spotted, based on propagation and operating habits
  • - when a needed DX station is highlighted and audibly announced, you'll be QRV before most of the competition
  • - you'll minimize time spent finding QSL routes, generating QSL requests, making award submissions, and updating your log to reflect award credit - freeing more time for hunting needed DX
  • - you can use a second transceiver for diversity reception or use an SDR as a tracking panadaptor; both enable you to more effectively work needed DX
  • - you'll be able to communicate with DX stations in their native language, increasing your chances of getting the QSO (DXLab knows ~50 phrases in ~70 languages, and shows you the right translations based on the DX station's callsign)
.
I'm often asked how I got to the top of the Honor Roll and to a Challenge total exceeding 2900 within 2 solar cycles after receiving my Novice ticket. The answer is "good antennas, a good receiver, and DXLab". Unlike the first two, DXLab is entirely free.

     73,

           Dave, AA6YQ
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