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Author Topic: Is CW going to survive?  (Read 4691 times)
OLDFART13
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« Reply #45 on: July 25, 2009, 02:49:14 PM »

I would like to see more new hams get involved in code but I don't think it will happen.  I think code will slowly die off.  I hope I'm wrong.
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K5END
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Posts: 1309




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« Reply #46 on: July 26, 2009, 11:56:33 AM »

They need to be aware of it and see it before they become interested in it.

ALL generations, not just the younger ones, have way too many things competing for their attention.

Two weeks ago my two young nephews came over to help me move some heavy stuff around in the ham shack. Their interest bordered on, "obligatory."

But then after the heavy work I showed them my new Begali and a PicokeyerPlus I'd just built.

Both of these kids are serious musicians and their interest in code was piqued beyond my belief.

They both want to learn it, and I will see to it they have the opportunity.
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AD7WN
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« Reply #47 on: July 26, 2009, 06:21:11 PM »

Of course CW will survive.  The reduction in CW activity on 12 and 17 is not a reliable indicator of the decline in interest in CW.  A lot of those ops are simply working the lower frequency bands, until we get some decent sunspot activity.

For the last few months, I have been coaching at least one ham at a time to help him/her learn morse.  Most of these folks are new hams who are disgusted with the CB-type activities to be heard on the 75 and 20 meter SSB sub-bands.  As long as these practices persist, we will be getting more CW ops.

73 de John/AD7WN
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N7DM
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« Reply #48 on: July 26, 2009, 08:18:06 PM »

I rarely hope I am wrong, but I *do* hope you are right. To be sure, Higher WARC bands are no 'indicator', but coupled with holes in 20 CW you could hold a Field Day through, I think it is safe to say operations are 'off'. Listening to the PHONE SUB-BAND on 20 is as bleak.

Yes, 'main' CW Ops is on 30 / 40 / 80, but those are usually night-time bands, and [frankly] I'm too long in the tooth for Darkness, so I haunt the Sunny bands!

Hope you are right, OM....
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N2EY
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« Reply #49 on: July 27, 2009, 03:55:50 PM »

To N7DM,

Speaking of Field Day,

This year I went with a multiclub local group. (Done that the past several years). We ran 5A+VHF. The five HF rigs consisted of three phone-only stations, one CW-only station, and one CW/data station. All HF rigs 100 W modern transceivers, all HF antennas wire dipoles/windoms G5RVs up 50 feet or so.

We ended up with 1376 QSOs, which is 2042 QSO points because phone gets 1 per QSO while CW and data get 2 per QSO.

We made:

20 QSOs on VHF, all 'phone (1.4% of QSOs, 1% of points)
690 phone QSOs on HF (50.1% of QSOs, 33.8% of points)
86 data QSOs on HF (6.3% of QSOs, 8.4% of points)
580 CW QSOs on HF (42.2% of QSOs, 56.8% of points)

IOW, the lone CW station, and its three operators (of whom I was one) made almost as many QSOs as the other five rigs combined, and more points!

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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« Reply #50 on: July 27, 2009, 04:28:03 PM »

HI HI.. You BETCHA!   I remember outrunning all the Phone stations.. ALONE!  Trouble is..... the following week...............[sigh]]
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N2EY
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« Reply #51 on: July 28, 2009, 07:16:15 PM »

N7DM:

What about the following week? Didja mean it was so quiet after FD? Of course that happens; it's summer and folks are doing other things.

btw, those results I quoted were for this year, even with the low sunspot numbers.

IMHO there are times for the usual day-to-day stuff and times to go all-out. FD and other contests are all-out times.

One thing that's great about FD is that it's something that only comes once a year, Another is that it's not really like anything else in ham radio; you can do FD so many ways.

IMHO the key (pun intended) to CW's survival is for those of us who love it to keep it alive, promote it and make it visible to all. I have met too many hams who have never really seen full-bore CW operation by skilled operators. Heck, look at the Leno Morse-code-vs.-text skit - the audience was absolutely convinced the texter would win, even though the world's record text speed at the time was less than half the world's record Morse Code speed.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N7DM
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« Reply #52 on: July 29, 2009, 04:28:46 PM »

No argument, OM... Contests always bring out The Faithful. But, alas, The Regulars ARE few and far between... on the daylight bands. Were it not so...

But, we will keep The Music going...OK ?

HI HI

dm
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N2EY
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« Reply #53 on: July 29, 2009, 05:06:14 PM »

N7DM,

Yes, things can get awful quiet between contests.

One big reason is that a lot of hams are busy working, commuting, caring for the kids and the elders, etc., much of the time.

I like 40 meters because it's usually open to someplace 24/7.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N5XM
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Posts: 242




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« Reply #54 on: July 29, 2009, 05:45:09 PM »

Yes, I think it can survive for a long time.  In my 13 years as a Ham, 12 years 99.9% CW, I've worked people of every age, from age 10 to age 100. I think there must be CW ops out there who are younger than we might think.  At 56, I hope to be good for at least 20 more years, so for the 30 year old ops, that's 40 more years of CW.  I'm looking at 60 more years at least.  All this is based on whether we can keep from blowing our little Earth into smithereens.
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K5END
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« Reply #55 on: July 30, 2009, 08:52:12 PM »

Well, NAQP-CW day is this Saturday.

Time to warm up.

See you there.
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K9TCG
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #56 on: August 08, 2009, 05:05:50 PM »

You must not listen to the cw band very much. Go down there and you will realize that cw is in very good shape, despite all the efforts to say otherwise. Code is a personal challenge, it makes you improve yourself the longer you use it. Anyone can talk on a microphone. CW is a skill. It is not going away.
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N7FE
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« Reply #57 on: August 08, 2009, 07:12:42 PM »

I am a no code extra and as long as you guys don't harass me about that and look to help me on the air when I get my antennas up I plan to learn code.

The no code extra will give me the opportunity to play hard and learn code at the same time. I know lots of you think this is not good, but it works for me.
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N2EY
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« Reply #58 on: August 09, 2009, 09:42:42 AM »

N7FE writes: "I am a no code extra"

There is no such thing AFAIK. At least, not to FCC.

The FCC has issued the modern Amateur Extra license since 1951. Since then the requirements for the license have changed, but all Extra licenses of all vintages have granted the same (full) operating privileges. The license documents all say the same thing; there's no indication of what exact tests the licensee passed, whether they were passed in front of an FCC examiner or VE team, how long the person was a ham before they got Extra, etc.

If we're going to start drawing lines over who passed what test, we'd have Extras who took the old 100 question non-multiple-choice written test, Extras who took the 50 question pre-Bash written test, Extras who took the VE written tests, Extras who passed 20 wpm, 13 wpm, 5 wpm, 0 wpm, Extras who passed sending tests and Extras who didn't, Extras who had to wait 2 years, 1 year, 0 years, Extras who used CSCEs and those who didn't, FCC-examiner Extras, VEC Extras, grandfathered-from-General Extras,....

The variations and permutations are incredible! I'm getting dizzy just trying to remember them all.

"The no code extra will give me the opportunity to play hard and learn code at the same time."

I don't know what you mean by "play hard and learn code at the same time". Please explain?

73 es GL de Jim, N2EY
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W5ESE
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« Reply #59 on: August 10, 2009, 08:38:49 AM »

I agree with N2EY.

The variety of permutations is dizzying.

I took the General in 1976, Advanced in 1977,
and Extra in 1978.

They were all pre-Bash (at least I think; I
never remember seeing the Bash books in the
radio stores). I used books from AMECO and
the ARRL.

I took the 13 wpm sending and receiving tests
with the General license, but by 1978, the
sending tests had been dropped. I am kind of
sorry about that, and sometimes wish that I
had the opportunity to take the 20 wpm sending
test with the Extra.

The ARRL has a Code Proficiency program that a
lot of amateurs seem not to know about.

They offer a certificate to hang on the wall
of the shack that looks much nicer than anything
I ever received from the FCC. Speeds can be
certified to levels faster than any code test
ever given by the FCC; commercial or amateur.

Details at:

http://www.arrl.org/awards/#cp

73
Scott
W5ESE
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