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Author Topic: Power supply questions.  (Read 4340 times)
KK4MSE
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Posts: 7




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« on: March 14, 2013, 02:10:00 PM »

I'm a new ham and have been enjoying making contacts and participating in local nets with my HT. I'm now looking to set up a 2m base station with a Yaesu FT-1900 or 2900. I need to know
the power supply requirements for these radios. Can I use the 12 amp power supply I already
own?
Thanks, KK4MSE.
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KQ6EA
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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2013, 03:21:59 PM »

Look in the manual. It should state the maximum current draw.
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W8JX
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2013, 03:42:29 PM »

FT-1900 is fine, the FT-2900 will overdraw it on high power if 12 amps is it's peak rating.
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AD4U
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Posts: 2166




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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2013, 03:45:42 PM »

I have a FT-2900.  Mine runs a solid 80 watts on high power.  A 12A PS will be very marginal on high power.  Used as a "base" station, you can run it at the mid power setting which is 25 watts and your 12A PS will be more than adequate.  25 watts into a good antenna should be more than enough power to work most any repeater you can hear.

Dick  AD4U
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KA4POL
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Posts: 1995




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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2013, 11:22:06 PM »

According to the specs:
FT-1900  11A
FT-2900  15A

As you did not say what type power supply you got I am a bit cautious. There are usually two ratings for supplies, continuous and peak currents. To be on the safe side I recommend a safety margin so you don't run at the limit.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2013, 04:36:33 AM »

A good rule of thumb is to take the maximum draw you intend to pull from that power supply and divide that figure by .8 to get the power supply constant rating you should buy.  That insures that you going to pull only 80 percent of the supply rating, keeping the supply cool and still able to comfortably supply any peak current that may be pulled.  The power supply bought and used in that manner is likely to run cooler and may just outlast your station!

Of course, you could look to the future, to any other radios you may want to power off that supply and get a 35 amp--or even a 50 amp or larger shack power supply.  It's up to you and your expectations/advancement in this hobby.  73!
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ONAIR
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« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2013, 12:50:23 AM »

I ran a FT-2900 on a 15 amp power supply.  One night on 75 Watts high power, the supply went pufft and caused a surge which took out the radio's overload circuit.  Fortunately the radio was only a few months old, so Yaesu fixed it for free.  I tossed the supply and got a new Jetstream 30 amp switcher, and all is now well.
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KM3F
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Posts: 506




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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 07:41:59 PM »

If your going to be long winded with radios like the 2900 on high power, consider mounting a fan on the top of the radio.
There not designed with enough heat sink area for long use at max power.
The Rockfish 4"square is a good one to use for low noise. They run slow for low noise but move more than enough air for better than 100 watts on finned amplifiers.
I run one on a 2800 and on two 100 watt class amplifiers.
Find them at Best Buy.
For power supply, consider a min of 20 amp constant load capacity unit.
The Diamond GZV4000 is really a nice supply with 5 to 15 volt panel control and a meter for either voltage or current with fan cooling if needed.
It can supply 40 amps and is not all that expensive and will handle any 100 + watt class radio for the future.
Good luck.
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KK4MSE
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2013, 02:09:36 PM »

Thanks guys, I'm looking at power supply's from MFJ and pyrimid.
I can get the Pyrimid locally at a place called Copper Electronics.
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AF8JC
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Posts: 17




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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2013, 02:21:40 PM »

Research Pyramid supplies in the "Reviews" section. After doing my research, I settled on an Astron conventional "heavy transformer" 35 amp supply with meters (way overkill for your application). The purists will tell you how even the Astron is a "starter kit" that needs to be modified to be a "good" power supply.

The cheap switching power supplies seem to be pretty popular, but high frequency might escape and get into the radio.

You pay your money, and you take your chances...
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K1CJS
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2013, 03:53:00 AM »

...I settled on an Astron conventional "heavy transformer" 35 amp supply with meters (way overkill for your application)....

Sure, but if you plan to add another radio later...  In any case I wouldn't call it overkill--not at all.
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