Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Icom IC-PW1 Power Output Meter Modifications  (Read 2389 times)
W4VR
Member

Posts: 1190


WWW

Ignore
« on: April 08, 2013, 01:04:30 PM »

Does anyone know of a mod for converting the PW1 Output Power Meter to a Peak Reading Meter?  I don't know why Icom did not make the meter peak reading when then designed the amp.
Logged
KB1NXE
Member

Posts: 309




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2013, 06:43:14 PM »

I know of none, but would question the accuracy of the meter in the IC-PW1 to begin with (yes I have one).  It varies significantly from my Wavenodes WN-2s with NIST traceable sensors.
Logged
W4VR
Member

Posts: 1190


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2013, 07:57:51 AM »

I know of none, but would question the accuracy of the meter in the IC-PW1 to begin with (yes I have one).  It varies significantly from my Wavenodes WN-2s with NIST traceable sensors.

Yes indeed, the power meter is certainly not a Bird.  Compared to the Bird it's about 100 watts low on certain bands.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2782




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2013, 11:51:22 AM »

Ah, yes -- the "Bird".  Probably talking about the Model 43, which is a decent, rugged meter which is still only accurate within ±5% of FSV.  And if you add the "Peak" kit, making it a Model 43P, it's only ±8% FSV.  And like any other measurement device, it requires periodic calibration - along with any slugs used with it.

The Bird 43 is not a "lab standard"; however, many seem to think it's the touchstone for "accuracy".
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N4TTS
Member

Posts: 152




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2013, 01:20:33 PM »

<snip>The Bird 43 is not a "lab standard"; however, many seem to think it's the touchstone for "accuracy".

How dare you insinuate "Bird watts" aren't real watts. Haven't you heard man? The bird is the word!

"A-well-a, everybody's heard about the bird,
 Bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word"

Don N4TTS
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20561




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2013, 02:15:19 PM »

<snip>The Bird 43 is not a "lab standard"; however, many seem to think it's the touchstone for "accuracy".

How dare you insinuate "Bird watts" aren't real watts. Haven't you heard man? The bird is the word!

"A-well-a, everybody's heard about the bird,
 Bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word"

Don N4TTS


Bird named it,
Bird made it;
Bird heard it,
then played it:
Well stated
Birdland...It happened down in Birdland.

In the middle of that hub
I remember one jazz club;
Where we went to pat feet
Down on 52nd Street.
Everybody heard that word
That they named it after Bird... Wink
Logged
W4VR
Member

Posts: 1190


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2013, 03:14:16 PM »

Ah, yes -- the "Bird".  Probably talking about the Model 43, which is a decent, rugged meter which is still only accurate within ±5% of FSV.  And if you add the "Peak" kit, making it a Model 43P, it's only ±8% FSV.  And like any other measurement device, it requires periodic calibration - along with any slugs used with it.

The Bird 43 is not a "lab standard"; however, many seem to think it's the touchstone for "accuracy".

There are no user adjustments on the slug or pickup of the Bird 43 that I am
aware of.  The 43 may not be a lab standard for some but it is certainly more accurate than any wattmeter in any amplifier that I've ever seen or owned.  The only manufacturer that I am aware of who used a Bird wattmeter in its amplifier was the old Henry 3K Ultra.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2782




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2013, 05:16:02 PM »

Even though there might not be any "user" adjustments, that doesn't mean that a slug can't be defective.  The Navy used to require (and may still require; it's been a while) that slugs used for testing had to be identified to a specific Bird meter by serial number.  No mixing of slugs was allowed.

If a meter didn't meet the manufacturer's specifications and a new slug fixed the problem, the old slug was "retired" and the new one appropriately marked for use with THAT meter only.

"User adjustments" -- depends on the user:
http://www.repeater-builder.com/projects/bird-element-tour/bird-element-tour.html

« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 05:21:19 PM by K7KBN » Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W4VR
Member

Posts: 1190


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2013, 06:16:37 PM »

Even though there might not be any "user" adjustments, that doesn't mean that a slug can't be defective.  The Navy used to require (and may still require; it's been a while) that slugs used for testing had to be identified to a specific Bird meter by serial number.  No mixing of slugs was allowed.

If a meter didn't meet the manufacturer's specifications and a new slug fixed the problem, the old slug was "retired" and the new one appropriately marked for use with THAT meter only.

"User adjustments" -- depends on the user:
http://www.repeater-builder.com/projects/bird-element-tour/bird-element-tour.html



Thanks for the link.  Now I know how to calibrate my 15 year old Bird 43 elements if they ever go out of calibration.  I'm sure Bird calibrates every element before it leaves the factory, but you never know when someone may be sleeping on the job and missed one or two!   Ron, W4VR
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20561




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2013, 09:50:36 AM »

Even though there might not be any "user" adjustments, that doesn't mean that a slug can't be defective.  The Navy used to require (and may still require; it's been a while) that slugs used for testing had to be identified to a specific Bird meter by serial number.  No mixing of slugs was allowed.

If a meter didn't meet the manufacturer's specifications and a new slug fixed the problem, the old slug was "retired" and the new one appropriately marked for use with THAT meter only.

"User adjustments" -- depends on the user:
http://www.repeater-builder.com/projects/bird-element-tour/bird-element-tour.html



Thanks for the link.  Now I know how to calibrate my 15 year old Bird 43 elements if they ever go out of calibration.  I'm sure Bird calibrates every element before it leaves the factory, but you never know when someone may be sleeping on the job and missed one or two!   Ron, W4VR

They do drift out of calibration over time, and the Bird elements are calibrated at 25C; when used at much higher or lower temperatures, they're all off and that's to be expected since they're calibrated at 25C. Wink

Calibration isn't difficult; I use a heat gun (for just a few seconds) to warm up the adhesive to remove the label and an X-Acto knife to lift one edge, and it comes off pretty easily.  Clean off the remaining adhesive, and then "hot melt" works well to re-attach.  Done this dozens of times.
Logged
TANAKASAN
Member

Posts: 933




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2013, 01:12:29 PM »

Drifting back on topic, the following circuit may help but I am unaware of the details regarding the meters in the PW-1.

http://www.n9mw.com/Radio%20Topics/PRWM.html

Tanakasan
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!