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Author Topic: Intimidated  (Read 6136 times)
N4JTE
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Posts: 1158




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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2013, 05:05:32 PM »

Where are you hearing this stuff ? When home, I spend hours upon hours on the air from stateside to europe, austrailia etc.
When on the OMISS net we go out of our way to welcome new people.
Stay away from the negative and enjoy the other 99% of us.
Bob
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VE3FMC
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Posts: 987


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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2013, 05:13:49 PM »

I'm a relative new Ham having just operated a year under my tech license working ARES/RACES and public service events. Recently I passed my General ticket and am getting ready to put my HF shack together. I purchased a Kenwood TS-140S in excellent shape from an estate and will be running an OCF Windom dipole. My club members have been extremely helpful checking out my rig and advising me.

My concern is this...I've monitored many bands on a receiver and hear many negative comments regarding new Hams not knowing what they are doing. There seems to be a disdain for new Hams among those who have many years of experience. My fear is I will offend someone out there while I get into the HF learning curve. How do I get going without upsetting folks on the air?

Thanks
Tim
KB3WZX

Hello Tim

Welcome to HF. I am sure you will enjoy it once you get used to operating there.

If you want to set up a sked in the future just look me up and send me an email. Iwill be happy to sit and have a rag chew with you. I am going to be away for a few days but when I get back we can set something up for 40 meters. That would be the band for us to work each other on.

Ignore the idiots, there are a few on the air. Just have fun, call CQ and enjoy the hobby.

73, Rick VE3FMC
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KX8N
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Posts: 542




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« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2013, 09:41:41 PM »

You've already got tons of good advice. I just wanted to add that you are always going to end up offending SOMEBODY, so try not to worry about it. Have fun!  Smiley

Dave
KX8N
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2238




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« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2013, 11:55:38 PM »

Trust me, there are JERKS and rude obnoxious people
in EVERY hobby, every club, every organization. There
are "Know It Alls" who look down on newcomers, forgetting
that THEY TOO once were new.

There are even "Better Than Thou" folks in my Gardening club!
Sheesh! Gardening is supposed to be a relaxing hobby!

My wife and I like to go to Cat Shows. My wife made the mistake
of putting her fingers up to one cage and petting the docile
cat through the bars. This guy runs over and YELLS
at the top of his voice:

"Get your FILTHY HANDS away from my animal!"
Uh, I though Cat People were supposed to be mellow.
We stopped going to Cat Shows......we were out of place.
%90 of the folks there were rich old ladies and young Gay men!  Grin

Anyway, back to radio.....
Just ignore any idiots and move on. If you DO
make a mistake, learn from it.

In my very first phone contest I made a boo-boo.
I could only use 10m at the time.
Anyway, I scanned the rules online and
learned the exchange was Report and CQ Zone.
Well,  I had a "6 Call" so my CQ Zone is 6, right?  Roll Eyes
Uh, um....California is actually CQ Zone 3. DOH!

The very first guy I called and gave "five nine zero three"
to asked me for my QTH. After I told him he called me
an idiot and a lid and said I "Should get off the air and
not play in contests until you upgrade...or grow a brain!"

I mean this guy was SCREAMING! Too much caffeine?
I wonder how many QSO's he coulda made in the
time it took to chew me out?  Grin

I was SO rattled by that that I immediately shut off
my rig, put the mic in the drawer, and gave up on the
contest all together.

Luckily I grew a thicker skin.

Just sayin there are a**holes in any endeavor,
don't let them bring you down.
Welcome to ham radio.
Yeah, send me an email and we can try a sched.
I am good at QRZ.com
73, Ken  AD6KA
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PD2R
Member

Posts: 131




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« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2013, 12:01:34 AM »

Hi Tim,

As one of the relative newcomers myself (licensed since '07), I have found the following article very useful: http://www.on4ww.be/OperatingPracticeEnglish.html

I was accompanied by one of my Elmers for my first HF QSO's, that too helped a lot.
Furthermore, if you have done your homework then just get on air. If you make a mistake, and you probably will at some point, apologize, learn from it and move on.
What's really the worst thing that can happen?

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AA4N
Member

Posts: 110




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« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2013, 12:30:06 AM »

You might consider giving CW a try sometime.  In my experience, the jerk ratio is significantly lower on the CW sub bands.

Welcome to HF!

73 mike
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KD8IIC
Member

Posts: 159




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« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2013, 01:45:40 AM »

 Most any open Net would be a fine place to start and there are many to choose from.Bad neighborhoods are easy to find.Best advice is to just listen a day or two and you'll figure this one out for yourself OM...73
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6045




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« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2013, 04:37:38 AM »

Quote
Where are you hearing this stuff ? When home, I spend hours upon hours on the air from stateside to europe, austrailia etc.
When on the OMISS net we go out of our way to welcome new people.
Stay away from the negative and enjoy the other 99% of us.

It's sad to say, but all too much of what is being heard is actually being seen.  RIGHT HERE.  On this ham radio site.  It seems like the internet and these sites draw the complainers, and those same people wouldn't dream of saying what they say here on the air.

Go ahead and have fun.  Don't worry about ruffling someone's feathers--on the bands a quick apology fixes almost anything minor, and if you do chance to commit a major error--it's unlikely--as long as you do NOT repeat the error, it'll be quickly forgotten about.  73!
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G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4715




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« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2013, 07:03:44 AM »

Tim,

Get a copy of the ARRL Operating Manual, 10th Edition, and read it. This will give you a good guide to operating.

If you want to start DX chasing, a copy of Bob Locher's book 'The Compleat DX'er' is worth getting - and it's a good read, too.

Don't forget that we all make mistakes every so often - like transmitting on the wrong VFO in the heat of the chase - even after 49 years (50 on April 29!) so don't worry too much.

GL es vy 73

Peter G3RZP
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K5LXP
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Posts: 4507


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« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2013, 07:11:17 AM »

I think it's inevitable at some point on the air you'll rub someone the wrong way, your fault or not.  Just like the internet, have your flame suit on.  Use the ON-OFF filter on your radio or just QSY - there are *way* more good QSO's out there than bad.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3900




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« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2013, 10:09:43 AM »

Tim: 
Quote
Where are you hearing this stuff ?

You've been given a lot of advice here and most of it valid and informational.

Just get on the air.  I can tell you in 57 years of hamming I've only be insulted maybe once or twice.  I got over it. 

So this means that out of thousands of contacts I've been flamed once or twice.  That's a pretty good ratio!

Forget this "intimidation" stuff and just go for it.  Daymn man....... join the fun!
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NK7Z
Member

Posts: 822


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« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2013, 10:27:57 AM »

I'm a relative new Ham having just operated a year under my tech license working ARES/RACES and public service events. Recently I passed my General ticket and am getting ready to put my HF shack together. I purchased a Kenwood TS-140S in excellent shape from an estate and will be running an OCF Windom dipole. My club members have been extremely helpful checking out my rig and advising me.

My concern is this...I've monitored many bands on a receiver and hear many negative comments regarding new Hams not knowing what they are doing. There seems to be a disdain for new Hams among those who have many years of experience. My fear is I will offend someone out there while I get into the HF learning curve. How do I get going without upsetting folks on the air?

Thanks
Tim
KB3WZX

Welcome to the hobby!  Don't let a few folks spoil it for you! 

There are bullies everywhere...  Engage them if you feel you want too, or ignore them if you want...  Just look here on eHam, or on QRZ, there are a few folks that drop on any one that posts...  Just forget they exist, do your thing, and when a decent person suggests something in a polite way, take it into consideration...  If you run across one of the bullies...  don't even respond...  From a standpoint of doing it right, good for you for caring!  Listen to the bands, see how folks are doing it now...  You will get the hang of it...

If someone gets upset, oh well...  Relax, enjoy the hobby!
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
N4CR
Member

Posts: 1672




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« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2013, 11:15:42 AM »

There seems to be an MO on different bands and also for different continents.

First, you will find net's on every band. Net's often form around a topic so you need to understand what that is before you join in, For example, the MMSN on 14.300 primarily handles boat traffic for offshore travelers on the water, but between these contacts they welcome any ham to stop by and say hi. And they want you to participate in the listening process so if you hear something they don't, you can tell them. If you just have your radio on for some noise in the room, this is a good place to park.

There's the OMISS ( Old Mans International Sideband Society) net that meets on a schedule. Hit up their web page to find times and frequencies, but they are absolutely going to welcome you with open arms.

Also, there's the early bird net that meets every morning on 3.940 WAAAAAY early in the morning. This net starts checkins about 3 am and is finished up by 6:30 most of the time. But if you're an early bird, this might be perfect for your life schedule. And they are among the friendliest bunch of guys I've ever met. You'll be not only welcome, but invited back to become regular. This might be the longest continuously operating net in amateur radio history. (operating once each day)

There's some nets that are all about getting a WAS, or Worked All States in your log. They thrive on new members. Literally, they need you to join in or it gets old. Geritol is one, but you have to be an extra class to go there (a goal for you) The 3905 Century Club and the Triple H are two good choices there and you'll be more than welcomed.

So finding and joining in on a net might be a very good way to get your comfort level up.

A lot of DX contacts are kept short by them because they just don't know conversational english, so they keep it to a few phrases that get them a contact and move on.

On the other hand, 160 and 75 meters is likely to find a bunch of guys that have known each other for a long time just doing regional rag chewing like would happen around the stove in an 1800's general store. Some of them don't want to meet new people some of them thrive on it. But if you want a long conversation that's more like real life among old friends, 75 meters is the place to find that. That doesn't mean there's no bad apples there, listen first and decide if the group is discussing something you like or not.

Next up would be 40 meters. Lot's of rag chews there and also lots of short contacts answering or calling CQ going for DX in your log. And it is often said that 40 meters is always open to somewhere. Some guys settle on this band as their only band because of it's qualities.

30 meters is digital or CW only, no voice in the US. I don't spend a lot of time there, so I can't comment on it's use, but probably mostly DX.

20 meters is a great daytime DX band and you'll find a mix of fast contacts and ragchewing, but mostly DX. You may have a hard time finding an empty frequency to call CQ, but if you do it can be a lot of fun.

17 meters guys will talk your ear off, so it's another ragchewing hot spot. Also it's a surprisingly good DX band when 20 meters is crowded.

When it's open, one of my favorite bands is 15 meters. It's a relatively big band so you can usually find a place to drive a stake in and start calling CQ, it's also an excellent DX band. Probably my favorite overall band for fun to operate, it just hasn't been open as much as I'd like during this solar cycle. But when it's hot, it's hot. When I'm at a field day setup, I always prefer 15 meters. Oh yeah, Field Day. Find a local one and attend. You won't find a friendlier bunch to meet up locally than a Field Day site. And it's just a couple of months from now so you have time to find it. And you get face time with the local hams, always a good thing. One thing you'll notice is that the curmudgeons and hermits don't show up for field day so the ones who are there will likely want you to join in with the activities. Go early and offer to help set up antennas for bonus points.

12 meters is kind of a strange band that has little but DX contacts on it. It's not open a lot due to lower solar activity, but when it is open, you often find yourself talking around the world. Which is cool all by itself.

10 meters is available to Tech class operators between 28.300 and 28.500, so you'll often find a lot of activity in that segment. It's another band that when it's open, you might find someone from the other side of the planet calling CQ. Due to low solar activity this cycle, 10 hasn't been open a lot, but it's certainly open enough to say it's not dead.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
KK5J
Member

Posts: 81




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« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2013, 12:38:54 PM »

The best way to overcome the awkwardness of beginning your HF experience is to get on the air. SO... let me know when your going to get on and we can set a SKED. I will be happy to visit with you on the air. Just let me know.
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KB3WZX
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2013, 01:54:52 PM »

Thank you to all who have responded. Just from reading every post my confidence is up. With luck and the help of my son, the antenna will be going up tomorrow and I may even answer a CQ or two. I took the mic off my rig last nite so I wouldn't be tempted to blow the finals out of it, hooked up an old CB antenna a guy gave me and " shadowed" quite a few QSO's.  Now I'm really excited.

Looking forward to possibly chatting with all of you on the air.

73
Tim
KB3WZX
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