Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: First Station  (Read 1921 times)
KF7ZCH
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« on: March 25, 2013, 07:42:12 PM »

I am currently weighing options for my first station.  The one spot that has been designated for ham radio is an inside room on the second story of the house.  Can I run my coax, ground, and other connections through the walls?  Would i need to have any different precautions to take care of RFI. 
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1773




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2013, 06:33:47 AM »

  Answere to first question: YES, with the obvious precautions.
  Answere to second question: Found in in RFI/EMI forum.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12897




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2013, 06:47:40 AM »

The first thing to realize is that on the second story you are not likely to be able to have an effective RF ground - certainly not if you run 30-feet of wire down to a ground rod in the ground. That's okay because with a properly designed, balanced antenna like a center-fed dipole or yagi you won't need an RF ground in the shack.

The key is to keep common mode currents from flowing on the outside of the coax shield. That way all of the RF will be confined within the shield and the coax won't radiate any RF to couple into other wiring in the walls and create RFI. That's best accomplished by using balanced, center-fed antennas with a current balun at the feed point and running the coax away from the antenna element at a 90-deg angle for at least 1/2 wavelength (as best you can). The worst-case senario is an off-center fed or an end-fed antenna.

For lightning protection you need to connect the coax shields to a single-point ground just before they enter the house. That should be connected to a ground rod and the electrical system grounding system with at least a #6 guage conductor.
Logged
KF7ZCH
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2013, 02:17:53 PM »

What if I am planning to build a vertical, would that affect the amount of rf on the outside of the cable and would I need a ground for my station?  I really wanted to put a ground on my station to protect all my equipment.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!